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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Recovery of the Empire ▸ Claudius IIView Options:  |  |  | 

Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemanni tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years.


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Diana is depicted here in the same pose as The Diana of Versailles, a slightly over life-size Roman marble statue from the 1st or 2nd century A.D., copying a lost Greek bronze original attributed to Leochares, c. 325 B.C. The sculpture may have come from a sanctuary at Nemi or possibly from Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli. In 1556, it was given by Pope Paul IV to Henry II of France, a subtle allusion to the king's mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It is now in the Musée du Louvre, Paris.
RA85169. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1031, RIC V 205, Huvelin 1990 16, Amasya 2311, Cohen VI 67, SRCV III 11327, Hunter VI - (p. lxxxii), Choice VF, coppery surfaces, traces of silvering, weight 3.598 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 1, c. September 268 – end 269; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse DIANAE VICTR, Diana standing slightly right, head right, drawing arrow with right hand from quiver on right shoulder, bow in left hand, small stag right at feet on right with head turned back looking at goddess, H in exergue; scarce; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
RA85170. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1020, RIC V 212, Hunter IV 76, Huvelin 1990 7, Amasya 2318, Colonne 481, Komin 1275, SRCV III 11343, Cohen VI 134, Choice VF, well centered and struck, attractive style, coppery surfaces with traces of silvering, weight 3.449 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, c. end 268 – end 269; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, peacock left at feet on left with head turned back looking at the goddess, B in exergue; $90.00 (€76.50)
 


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This coin, dedicated by the reverse legend to the health of the emperor, indicates Claudius was ill and vows had been made to Apollo, the god of medicine, for his recovery. Apollo and Diana were fraternal twins, and had a good sibling relationship. Perhaps she was also asked to help the emperor. Unfortunately, Apollo and Diane could not help Claudius. He died of the plague soon after this coin was struck.
RA77133. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1088 (7 spec.), Huvelin NAC XIX 62, RIC V 219, Cohen VI 260, SRCV III 11369 var., F, well centered, highlighting earthen fill, cleaning scratches, weight 3.915 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 4, c. mid 270; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Diana on left, standing right, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, bow in left hand, facing Apollo, on right, standing left, olive branch in right hand, lyre resting on rock behind in left hand; rare; $85.00 (€72.25)
 


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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RA85172. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1028, Hunter IV 75, Huvelin 1990 14, Amasya 2312, Komin 1274, Trésors de Syrie 1965 5, Bastien-Huvelin, 6, RIC V 207, SRCV III 11333, VF, excellent centering and strike, obverse a little rough, very nice reverse, coppery surfaces, traces of silvering, weight 3.421 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, 7th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 1, c. end 268 – end 269; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES AVG, Mercury standing slightly left, nude but for petasos, boots and cloak on arm, purse in right hand, caduceus in left hand, Z in exergue; $50.00 (€42.50)
 


Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.

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This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RA85621. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC temp 57 (277 spec.), RIC V 149, Hunter VI 54, Normanby 1025, Venèra 9251-9277, Cunetio 2259, Colonne 451, SRCV III 11335, Cohen VI 88, EF, well centered and struck, tight flan, light deposits, flan crack, weight 3.415 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 2nd-3rd issue, mid 269 – spring 270 A.D.; obverse IMP CLAVDIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse FIDES MILIT (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides standing slightly left, holding two flanking standards, one in each hand, S in exergue; $50.00 (€42.50)
 


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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA84409. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 1060, RIC V 225, Cohen VI 316, Huvelin 1990 23, Komin 1281, Bastien-Huvelin 77, aVF, gray metal, grainy surfaces, weight 3.259 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, issue 3, c. early - mid 270; obverse IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Minerva standing right, wearing crested helmet, vertical spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, no control or mintmark; $32.00 (€27.20)
 







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DIVOCLAVDIO
DIVOCLAVDIOGOTHICO
DIVOCLAVDIOOPTIMOIMP
DIVOCLAVDIOOPTIMP
IMPCCLAVDIVSAVG
IMPCLAVDIVSAVG
IMPCLAVDIVSPFAVG
IMPCMAVRCLAVDIVSAVG


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Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 21, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Claudius II