Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ EphesusView Options:  |  |  | 

Ephesos, Ionia (Turkey)

Ephesos, a city of great numismatic tradition, continued to strike cistophoric tetradrachms from Augustus to Claudius. During his bid for the throne, Vespasian opened the mint for denarii (rare) and aurei (extremely rare) production from 70 to 74 A.D. Mintmarks: EPHE.


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The cistophorus was first struck by the Pergamene Kingdom was a tetradrachm (four-drachms coin) struck on a reduced Asian standard of about 3 grams per drachm. Its name was derived from the cista, a Dionysian cult snake basket that frequently appeared on the obverse. After the Pergamene Kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 B.C., the Romans continued to strike cistophori for the Asia province, with a value equal to three denarii. The portrait of Augustus and later emperors replaced the cista on the obverse.
SH85434. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Sutherland Group VI, RPC I 2215, RIC I 479, RSC I 33, BnF I 922, BMCRE I 694, BMCRR East 262, SRCV I 1587, VF, full circles strike on a broad flan, light uneven toning, light encrustations, small closed edge crack, weight 11.660 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesus mint, c. 24 - 20 B.C.; obverse IMP CAE-SAR (counterclockwise below), bare head right, linear border; reverse garlanded and filleted altar of Diana (artemis, ornamented on the front with two hinds standing confronted, AVGVSTVS above; $1200.00 (Ä1020.00)


Roman Republic, Second Triumvirate, Mark Antony and Octavian, Spring - Early Summer 41 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
AVG in the obverse legend, abbreviates Antony's official position as Augur (not Augustus, a title which did not yet exist). The augur was an official and priest, whose main role was to interpret the will of the gods by studying the flight of birds: whether they are flying in groups or alone, what noises they make as they fly, direction of flight and what kind of birds they are. This was known as "taking the auspices." The ceremony and function of the augur was central to any major undertaking in Roman society, public or private, including matters of war, commerce, and religion. The Roman historian Livy stresses the importance of the augurs: "Who does not know that this city was founded only after taking the auspices; that everything in war and in peace, at home and abroad, was done only after taking the auspices?"

Octavian's "equivalent" position as Pontifex, a priest, is abbreviated PONT in the reverse legend.

The moneyer M. Barbatius was a friend of Julius Caesar. In 41 B.C. he was a quaestor pro praetore to Antony in the East.
SH86164. Silver denarius, RSC I Mark Antony and Augustus 8, BMCRR 103, Sydenham 1181, Crawford 517/2, SRCV I 1504, VF, toned, banker's marks, tight flan, reverse off center, light corrosion, weight 3.639 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 90o, military mint moving with Antony, Ephesus(?) mint, spring - early summer 41 B.C.; obverse M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P (MP and AV ligate), bare head of Antony right; reverse CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C, bare head of Octavian right; from the Lucas Harsh Collection, ex Incitatus Coins (Mar 2012); scarce; $580.00 (Ä493.00) ON RESERVE


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 305 - 288 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Ephesus was on the coast of Ionia, three kilometers southwest of present-day Selcuk in Izmir Province, Turkey. It was built in the 10th century B.C. on the site of the former Arzawan capital by Attic and Ionian Greek colonists and was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League. The city was famed for the Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C. and one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia that are cited in the Book of Revelation. The Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB86113. Bronze AE 11, BMC Ionia p. 55, 68; SNGvA 1839; SNG Cop 256; SNG Kayhan -, aVF, a little off center but most detail on flan, weight 1.306 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, Ephesos mint, c. 305 - 288 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Tyche left, wearing mural crown and drop earring; reverse bee with straight wings, seen from above, E − Φ flanking across field; SOLD







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Sunday, November 19, 2017.
Page created in 1.264 seconds.
Ephesos