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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Trebonianus GallusView Options:  |  |  | 

Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

Trebonianus Gallus was proclaimed emperor by the Roman army after the defeat and death of Trajan Decius. Gallus signed a humiliating treaty with the Goths, before spending the next couple of years repelling barbarian incursions in both the North and East of the empire. Gallus was murdered, along with his son, by his own forces after the usurper Aemilian defeated them in battle.


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This scarce type commemorates Trebonianus Gallus' decennalian vows, prayers and sacrifices he made to the gods that they might help him successfully achieve his tenth anniversary of rule. In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action, a vow, or promise. It may refer also to the fulfillment of this vow, that is, the thing promised. The votum is thus an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion and sacrifice, a bargaining expressed by "do ut des" (I give that you might give).
RB76162. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC 127a (R), Cohen V 137 (10 fr.), Hunter III 29, Banti 38, SRCV III 9683, VF, nice portrait, nice patina, well centered on a crowded flan, weight 17.910 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, special emission, August - October 251 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES C VIBIVS TREBONIANVS GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VOTIS / DECENNA / LIBVS / S C in four lines within laurel wreath tied at the bottom and closed with a jewel at the top; rarities; $600.00 (534.00)


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Juno was the patron deity of Trebonianus Gallus. The epithet Martialis literally means "of or belonging to Mars" or "warlike," but the depictions of Juno Martialis on the coins are not warlike. The epithet may refer to Juno as the mother of Mars. Or perhaps she is Juno of March - her festival was on 7 March. Perhaps the title refers to her temple in the Campus Martius, the old "Field of Mars" down by the Tiber. She is sometimes equated with Juno Perusina, as Perugia was where Trebonianus Gallus came from, and as such is sometimes called Juno Martialis Perusina by modern scholars.
SH66386. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 110a corr. (peacock), Banti 14 corr. (same), Cohen V 50, SRCV III 9670, Hunter - (p. cv), VF, nice patina, attractive style, weight 13.008 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES C VIBIVS TREBONIANVS GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IVNONI MARTIALIS, Shrine of Juno Martialis: domed, distyle rotunda with Corinthian columns, garlands hanging below dome; statue of Juno seated facing within holding two stalks of grain in extended right; ex Triskeles Auction, lot 164, auction 2 (25 Apr 2013); $120.00 (106.80)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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The last regular tetradrachms minted at Antioch were struck during Gallus' second consulate. Prieur notes, "It is highly likely that the debasement of these issues made them so unreliable in the eyes of the public that a new system had to be developed. Since a system based on the antoninianus already existed in the western part of the empire, it naturally replaced the tetradrachm in the East."
RY77717. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1172(c); Prieur 660 (24 spec.); Dura Coins 580; SNG Hunterian 3112; BMC Galatia p. 227, 638; cf. SNG Cop 288 (1st officina); SNG Munchen -, aVF, well centered on a tight flan, corrosion, porosity, edge crack, weight 12.910 g, maximum diameter 26.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 1st issue, Jul - Jan 251 A.D.; obverse AYTOK K Γ OYIB TPEB ΓAΛΛOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, (3rd officina) below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (tribune of the people), eagle standing facing on exergual line, head and tail left, wings spread, wreath in beak, Γ (3rd officina) between legs, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $50.00 (44.50)


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In Roman Coins and their Values III, David Sear notes, "Under Trebonianus Gallus the fineness of the antoninianus is generally around 35% whilst the average weight is about 3.4 grams."
RS79910. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 2e, RIC IV 79 (S), Hunter III 56, SRCV III 9622, gVF/F, excellent centering, scratches, light corrosion, small encrustations, weight 4.880 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 251 - 252 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, two pellets below; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), Emperor on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, transverse scepter in left hand, two pellets in exergue; scarce; $50.00 (44.50)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

GALLVSPIVSAVG
IMPCAESCVIBIVSTREBONIANVSGALLVSAVG
IMPCAECVIBTREBGALLVSAVG
IMPCCVIBTREBGALLVSAVG
IMPCCVIBTREBGALLVSPFAVG
IMPCGALLVSAVG


REFERENCES

Banti, A. and L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H.B., E.A. Sydenham & C.H.V. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H.A. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, April 25, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Trebonianus Gallus