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Certified or Encapsulated Coins

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 320 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander III the Great

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Struck under Polyperchon, regent of the Macedonian empire, 319 - 317 B.C. Polyperchon was a general under Philip II and Alexander the Great. Following the First War of the Diadochi, he was governor in Macedonia while Antipater tried to assert his regency over the whole empire. In 319 B.C., Antipater made Polyperchon his successor as regent, passing over his own son, Kassander. A civil war soon broke out between Kassander, supported by Antigonus and Ptolemy and Polyperchon, allied with Eumenes. In 317 B.C., Kassander drove Polyperchon out of Macedonia and took control of the mentally disabled King Philip III Arrhidaeus and his wife Eurydice. Polyperchon fled to Epirus, where he joined Alexander's mother Olympias, his widow Roxana, and his infant son King Alexander IV. Together Olympias and Polyperchon invaded Macedonia. An army commanded by Philip III immediately defected and Philip and his wife Eurydice were murdered. Soon after, however, the tide turned, Kassander was victorious, Olympias was executed, and the boy King Alexander IV, and his mother Roxana were captured (both would be killed in 310 B.C. to secure Kassander's rule). Polyperchon surrendered the regency to Antigonus, but the empire was already forever divided. Polyperchon is last mentioned as being alive in 304 B.C. but may have lived into the early 3rd century B.C.
SL84531. Silver tetradrachm, Price 124, Mller Alexander 560, Troxell issue J6, Demanhur 1564 ff., Meydancikkale 93 ff. SNG Munchen 285, SNG Alpha Bank 510, SNG Cop -, NGC AU, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (4166072-003), weight 17.11 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 30o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, c. 318 - 317 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, laurel branch left, Πo under throne; NGC certified (slabbed), from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $900.00 (801.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III and Alexander IV, c. 323 - 317 B.C., In the Name of Alexander

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Struck after Alexander's death, under either Perdikkas or Antipater, regents during the joint reign of Alexander's mentally disabled half-brother, Philip III, and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule. Both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Olympias had Philip murdered to ensure the succession of her grandson. But Alexander IV would never rule. In 311 B.C., he and his mother Roxana were executed by the regent Kassander.
SL84530. Silver tetradrachm, Price 113, Mller Alexander 224, Troxell issue H3, SNG Cop 682, SNG Munchen 275, SNG Alpha Bank 503, SNG Delepierre 986, NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 2/5, scratches (4163183-004), weight 17.04 g, maximum diameter 25 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 322 - 320 A.D.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Macedonian helmet left; NGC certified (slabbed), from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $570.00 (507.30)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

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This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $450.00 (400.50)


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
SL84532. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 94(6)b, Price 3359, Mller Alexander 1511, HGC 9 10g, NGC Choice F, Strike 5/5, Surface 3/5 (4164845-004), weight 16.87 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 255o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus seated left on throne, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, anchor and A (control symbols) left, M (control symbol) under throne; NGC certified (slabbed), from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $350.00 (311.50)


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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This coin is in an unusual slab with a clear plastic dome over the reverse. The dome looks attractive but the coin is impossible to photograph. The coin is normally and evenly dark, much nicer than the photo with its strange banded light and dark reflections off the dome.

This type commemorates Antoninus Pius acclamation as imperator for the second time, recognizing the victory of Q. Lollius Urbicus over the Brigantes in Britain, and the construction of the Antonine Wall.
SL84529. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 717b, Banti 179, Hunter II 252, Cohen II 434, SRCV II 4182, BMCRE IV 1612 var. (No TR P), ANACS VF30 (4625583), Rome mint, 143 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse IMPERATOR II, Victory alighting right, wings spread, holding transverse trophy with both hands, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking at thighs; certified (slabbed) by ANACS, from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $300.00 (267.00)


Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.

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Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. The earliest certain cult to dea Roma was established at Smyrna in 195 B.C., probably to mark the successful alliance against Antiochus III. In 30/29 B.C., the Koinon of Asia and Bithynia requested permission to honor Augustus as a living god. "Republican" Rome despised the worship of a living man, but an outright refusal might offend their loyal allies. A cautious formula was drawn up, non-Romans could only establish a cult for divus Augustus jointly with dea Roma. In the city of Rome itself, the earliest known state cult to dea Roma was combined with Venus at the Hadrianic Temple of Venus and Roma. This was the largest temple in the city, probably dedicated to inaugurate the reformed festival of Parilia, which was known thereafter as the Romaea after the Eastern festival in Roma's honor. The temple contained the seated, Hellenised image of dea Roma with a Palladium in her right hand to symbolize Rome's eternity.
SL84528. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1037, BMCRE IV 1420, Hunter II 169, Cohen III 284, MIR 18 233, SRCV II 4977, ANACS VF30 (4625585), Rome mint, Dec 171 - Dec 172 A.D.; obverse M ANTONINVS - AVG TR P XXVI, laureate head right; reverse IMP VI COS III (imperator 6 times, consul 3 times), Roma seated left on cuirass, helmeted and draped, transverse spear on far side in right hand, resting her left forearm on round shield stacked upon an oval shield and a hexagonal shield, S C (senatus consulto) flanking across fields; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, certified (slabbed) by ANACS; $195.00 (173.55)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
SL84526. Silver denarius, RIC IV 224; RSC III 165; BMCRE V p. 372, 90; Hunter III 15; SRCV II 6821, NGC AU (4277059-009), Rome mint, 210 - 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $190.00 (169.10)


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

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The war with the Vandalic Kingdom of Carthage in 533 - 534 was the first of Justinian I's wars of reconquest of the lost Western Roman Empire. The Vandals had occupied Roman North Africa in the early 5th century and established an independent kingdom. The Byzantine expeditionary force landed on the African coast in early September 533. The Vandal king Gelimer met the Byzantine army at the Battle of Ad Decimum, near Carthage, on 13 September. His elaborate plan to encircle and destroy the Byzantines came close to success, but Belisarius forced a Vandal retreat and occupied Carthage. Gelimer withdrew, gathered his remaining strength, and in December advanced towards Carthage and met the Romans at the Battle of Tricamarum. Gelimer was defeated and fled to a remote mountain fortress, where he was blockaded until he surrendered in the spring. Belisarius returned to Constantinople with the Vandals' royal treasure and the captive Gelimer to enjoy a triumph. Africa was formally restored to imperial rule as the praetorian prefecture of Africa. The new province faced war with the Moors and military rebellions, and it was not until 548 that peace was restored and Roman government firmly established.The Vandalic War in 533-534

SL84527. Silver siliqua, SBCV 254, Sommer 4.119, Hahn MIB 53, Morrisson BnF 8, Tolsotoi 575, BMC p. 81, 4 (Ostrogothic), DOC I -, Ratto -, ANACS VF20 (4625611), Carthage (near Tunis, Tunisia) mint, 537 - 552 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AC, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse monogram , cross above, S below (unstruck), all within linear border surrounded by wreath; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection, certified (slabbed) by ANACS; scarce; $160.00 (142.40)


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D.

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In 162, Marcus Aurelius sent Lucius Verus to lead the war against Parthia. Lucius spent most of the campaign in Antioch, though he wintered at Laodicea and summered at Daphne, a resort just outside Antioch. Critics derided Lucius' luxurious lifestyle. He took up a mistress, enjoyed the company of actors and would "dice the whole night through." The Syrian army was said to spend more time in Antioch's open-air cafs than with their units. The war was, nevertheless, a success. Despite Lucius' minimal personal participation, he was awarded the titles Armeniacus, Medicus and Parthicus Maximus and a triumph upon his return to Rome in 166.
SL76246. Orichalcum sestertius, BMCRE IV p. 564, 1116; Cohen 249, RIC III M. Aurelius 1396 var. (drapery not mentioned), NGC certified VG, strike 4/5, surface 2/5, lt. scrapes (4094568-014), weight 22.91 g, maximum diameter 33.0 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, Dec 163 - Dec 164 A.D.; obverse L AVREL VERVS - AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse TR P IIII - IMP II COS II, Victory standing facing, head right, nude to the waist, both wings visible on left, palm frond in right, resting left on shield inscribed VIC / AVG in two lines set on palm tree, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking in lower fields; from the Sam Mansourati Collection; scarce; $130.00 (115.70)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

David Sear notes, "a previously unpublished variant of the series listed by Bastien (Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon) on pages 163 and 164, numbers 155-6 and 159-61 (cf. RIC vii, p. 134, 202-4)...good F, rare and interesting as an unpublished obverse variant."
RL70838. Billon centenionalis, unpublished obverse variant; cf. Bastien Lyon XIII, 155-6 and 159-61; RIC VII Lyons 202 - 204, gF, weight 3.451 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear pointed forward in right, shield in left; reverse BEAT TRAN-Q-LITAS, globe on altar inscribed VOT/IS / XX in three lines, three stars above, PLG in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; $125.00 (111.25)




  



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