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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ CologneView Options:  |  |  |   

Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany)

Colonia Agrippinensis established a mint under Postumous and struck for the subsequent Romano-Gallic usurpers.


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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The Rhine and the Danube formed most of the northern inland frontier of the Roman Empire.
RA72656. Billon antoninianus, Cunetio 2371, RSC IV 355b, Schulzki AGK 88c, RIC V 87, SRCV III 10991, Elmer 123, Hunter IV - (p. lxxxviii), gVF, reverse scratches, weight 3.812 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 1st emission, 2nd phase, 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS PROVINCIARVM (health of the provinces), river-god Rhenus (Rhine) reclining left, horned, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, resting right forearm on prow of a boat, reed cradled in left hand and arm, left elbow resting on urn behind; $150.00 (127.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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This type has been attributed to "Mint II," which is believed to be Cologne, but it is quite crude and could also be imitative. See RIC V, Part II, p. 349, note 1, for comments on imitative of this and similar types.
RB90466. Bronze double sestertius, cf. CNG auction 109, lot 243 (same reverse die); Bastien Postume 313; Mricourt-l'Abb Hoard in TM XIII (1992) 95, VF, struck with damaged reverse die, corrosion, weight 9.446 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 90o, Mint II Cologne (or imitative) mint, c. 266 - spring 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse galley right, five oarsmen, AMV above, retrograde P left, Q(?) right, waves over palm frond left below; $130.00 (110.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Deusoniensis probably refers to modern Deutz, on the Rhine across from Cologne. Apparently, Hercules was worshiped there and it has been suggested that Postumus was born in the town. From these relatively obscure provincial origins, Postumus would have risen through the ranks of the army until he held command of the Roman forces "among the Celts." What his precise title was is not definitely known, though he may have been promoted by Valerian to imperial legate of Lower Germany. Postumus was evidently in favor at Valerian's court, and may even have been granted an honorary consulship.
RS64647. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 91a, RIC V 64, Mairat 13, Schulzki AGK 25, Elmer 124, Hunter IV 14, SRCV III 10944, aVF, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse HERC DEVSONIENSI (to Hercules of Deuson), Hercules standing slightly right, head right, nude, resting right hand on grounded club behind, bow in left hand, Nemean lion skin draped over his left arm; $80.00 (68.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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"This refers to the importance of naval power in the Gallic Empire and perhaps even to an imperial visit to Britain in the early years of Postumus' reign" -- Roman Coins and Their Values III by David Sear.
RS64687. Silver antoninianus, RIC V 73, RSC IV 167a, Mairat 18, Schulzki AGK 41, Elmer 186, SRCV III 10958, VF, weight 3.026 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITIA AVG (the joy of the Emperor), war galley left over waves, four rowers and steersman; $80.00 (68.00)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

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Venus (Aphrodite) started the Trojan War with a golden apple. When she failed to receive a wedding invitation, she maliciously deposited a golden apple inscribed "For the fairest" on the banquet table. The goddesses argued who deserved this prize. It was determined the most handsome mortal in the world, a noble Trojan youth named Paris, would decide. Each of the three finalists offered Paris a bribe. Hera promised he would rule the world. Athena said she would make him victorious in battle. Aphrodite guaranteed the love of the most beautiful woman in the world. This was Helen, who was married to the king of Sparta. Paris awarded the golden apple to Aphrodite. Aphrodite enabled Paris to elope with Helen, Helen of Troy. Helen's husband raised a Greek army to retrieve his wife, starting the Trojan War.
RS65792. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 904c, RSC IV 134 (Lyon), Hunter III S19 (Rome), Cunetio 735 (64 spec.), Elmer 98, SRCV III 10662, RIC V -, VF, toned, tight ragged flan, flan cracks, small encrustations, weight 3.028 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 45o, Cologne mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head, crescent behind shoulders; reverse VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing right, viewed from behind, nude but for drapery at hips, buttocks exposed, leaning with left elbow on column, apple (or helmet?) in extended right hand, transverse palm on far side in left; not in RIC; $75.00 (63.75)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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"This refers to the importance of naval power in the Gallic Empire and perhaps even to an imperial visit to Britain in the early years of Postumus' reign" -- Roman Coins and Their Values III by David Sear.
RS64651. Silver antoninianus, RIC V 73, RSC IV 167a, Mairat 18, Schulzki AGK 41, Elmer 186, SRCV III 10958, VF, well centered, struck with worn and slightly damaged obverse die, small edge cracks, weight 3.495 g, maximum diameter 22.2 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITIA AVG (the joy of the Emperor), war galley left over waves, four rowers and steersman; $70.00 (59.50)


Gallic Empire, Victorinus, Summer to November 268 - mid 271 A.D.

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In 270, the Empire suffered an economic crisis due to usurpations, partition of the empire, invasions, and sackings of the countryside and cities. Agricultural and industrial productions were significantly decreased, and mines went unused. A monetary crisis ensued. Inflation was up to 1,000% in some areas of the empire.q
RA84435. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 21b, Cunetio 2564, Elmer 703 (Trier), RIC V 65, SRCV III 11180 var. (same), Cohen VI 114 var. (same), VF, nice portrait, slightly ragged flan, weight 2.978 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 225o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 269 A.D.; obverse IMP C PIAV VICTORINVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus standing right, feeding snake in right hand from patera in left hand; $65.00 (55.25)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS64649. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 9, Elmer 586, RIC V 287, RSC IV 31a, Mairat 168 - 171, Hunter IV 42, SRCV III 10932, Cunetio -, gVF, much silvering, edge cracks, weight 2.859 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippina (Cologne) mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse COS IIII (consul for the 4th time), Victory standing right, raising wreath in right hand, long grounded palm frond in right hand before her; $60.00 (51.00)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Uberitas is the personification of fruitfulness, primarily agricultural fertility.
RS64676. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 366a, RIC V 330, Mairat 136, Schulzki AGK 94, Hunter IV 93, SRCV III 10995, VF, well centered, toned, small edge cracks, weight 3.982 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VBERTAS AVG (to the abundance of the Emperor), Uberitas standing facing, head left, right leg forward, purse in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $60.00 (51.00)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS64718. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 868h, RIC V 12, RSC IV 143a, Hunter IV 53, SRCV III 9952, VF, excellent portrait, toned, well centered on a tight, slightly oval flan, deposits, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.908 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ORIENS AVGG (the rising sun of the two emperors), Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, left arm and flying behind, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left hand; $60.00 (51.00)




  



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Colonia Agrippinensis