Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Greek Imperial| ▸ |Greece||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Provincial Coins from Greece

The Perrhaiboi, Thessaly, Greece, c. Late 2nd - Early 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Perrhaiboi were a Pelasgian (indigenous non-Greek) tribal people who lived in Perrhaibia, north of Thessaly proper and bordering Macedonia. Their capital was Phalanna, and their most significant town was Olosson. In the Iliad, Homer wrote of "the valiant Perrhaiboi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona, and held the lands round the lovely river Titaresios, which sends its waters into the Peneus." The Perrhaiboi fought in the Battle of Thermopylae. Through most of their history they were overshadowed and controlled by Thessaly, although they had two votes at the Delphic Amphictyony. Philip II of Macedon took their kingdom and it remained under Macedonian control until the Roman conquest in 196 B.C.
GB76999. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly I 1247 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 561; Rogers 440, fig. 239; SNG Cop 197, HGC 4 157, aVF, well centered, some corrosion, weight 6.372 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Olosson or Phalanna mint, c. late 2nd - early 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right, wearing oak wreath; reverse ΠEPPAI/BΩN (in two lines, starting upward from lower left, ending downward on right), Hera seated right on backless throne, long scepter vertical behind in right hand, resting left hand on knee, no magistrate name or initials; $105.00 (€92.40)
 


Kierion, Thessaly, Greece, c. 400 - 344 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Kierion was originally named Arne for the Nymph on the reverse of this coin. Most references, including BCD, identify the male god on the obverse as Zeus. SNG Cop says Poseidon. Since, according to one myth, Arne became pregnant by Poseidon and bore the twins Aiolos and Boiotos, we think Poseidon is more likely.

This coin has potentially active corrosion. We have had the coin for over a year and it has remained stable and unchanged. It must, however, be stored in a humidity controlled environment.
GB79733. Bronze chalkous, cf. BCD Thessaly II 107.4; Rogers 173a; SNG Cop 35; BMC Thessaly p. 15, 1; SNG Evelpidis 1516; HGC 4 679 (S), VF, well centered, dark patina, corrosion, weight 2.494 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 315o, Kierion mint, c. 400 - 344 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Zeus right, fillet binding his hair; reverse KIEPIEIΩN, the nymph Arne kneeling right on right knee, looking left, her torso bare, leaning on right hand on the ground, tossing astragaloi with left; scarce; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Durrës, one of the oldest cities in Albania, was founded as Epidamnos in 627 B.C. by colonists from Corinth and Corcyra. Located around a rocky harbor, surrounded by inland swamps and high cliffs, the city was difficult to attack from land or sea. After its defeat to Rome in 229 B.C., the new rulers renamed the city Dyrrachium. Epidamnos is similar to the Latin damnum, meaning "loss." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," likely referring to the nearby cliffs. Dyrrachium prospered under Rome and was made a naval and military base. Pompey made a stand there in 48 B.C. before fleeing south to Greece. Augustus made the city a colony for veterans of his legions following the Battle of Actium, proclaiming it a civitas libera (free town).
GS91758. Silver drachm, Ceka 325; Maier 278; BMC Thessaly p. 71, 94; SNG Cop 478; Mionnet 122; HGC 3.1 40; SNG München -, gVF, toned, light marks, a little off center, weight 2.727 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 105o, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, magistrates Meniskos & Lykiskon, c. 229 - 80 B.C.; obverse cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, MENIΣKOΣ above, sculpture of female (Isis?) right; reverse ∆YP - ΛY-KIΣ-KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square; scarce; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Thessalian League, Greece, Mid - Late 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in N. Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C and it remained under Macedonia until the Roman victory in 197 B.C. The league was reestablished in 196 B.C. but had little autonomy after Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia in 146 B.C.
GB71024. Bronze dichalkon (or obol), BCD Thessaly II 907.2, SNG Cop 331, Rogers 59, Burrer p. 62, BMC Thessaly -, VF, weight 7.412 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa(?) mint, Philokrates, Italos, and Petraios, magistrates; obverse ΦIΛOKPA−TOYΣ (magistrate), head of Athena right, wearing crested helmet and aegis; reverse ΘEΣΣA−ΛΩN, Athena Itonia standing left, Nike standing left offering wreath in her extended right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield behind, spear standing behind, ITA−ΛOY (magistrate) across upper field, ΠETPAIOΣ exergue; $70.00 (€61.60)
 


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, 229 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Durrës, one of the oldest cities in Albania, was founded as Epidamnos in 627 B.C. by colonists from Corinth and Corcyra. Located around a rocky harbor, surrounded by inland swamps and high cliffs, the city was difficult to attack from land or sea. After its defeat to Rome in 229 B.C., the new rulers renamed the city Dyrrachium. Epidamnos is similar to the Latin damnum, meaning "loss." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," likely referring to the nearby cliffs. Dyrrachium prospered under Rome and was made a naval and military base. Pompey made a stand there in 48 B.C. before fleeing south to Greece. Augustus made the city a colony for veterans of his legions following the Battle of Actium, proclaiming it a civitas libera (free town).
GS91759. Silver drachm, Ceka 320; BMC Thessaly p. 69, 62; SNG München 365; SNG Tübingen 1396; SNG Cop 467; SNG Leipzig 677, gVF, attractive toning, uneven strike, reverse off center, small edge splits, weight 3.016 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 0o, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, 229 - 100 B.C.; obverse MENIΣKOΣ (magistrate), cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, raven flying right above, grain over cluster of grapes right; reverse ∆YP - ∆IO-NYΣ-IOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square; $70.00 (€61.60)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Koinon of Thessaly

Click for a larger photo
After the end of Second Macedonian War, at the ceremony of the Isthmian Games in 196 B.C., Flamininus, stated a decree: "The Senate of Rome and Titus Quinctius the pro-consul, having overcome King Philip and the Macedonians, leave the following peoples free, without garrisons and subject to no tribute and governed by their countries' laws - the Corinthians, Phocians, Locrians, Euboeans, Phthiotic Achaeans, Magnesians, Thessalians, and Perrhaibians." Rome established Thessaly as a koinon, a federal league. For 50 years, the Thessalian League restored stable local government in a region that had suffered more than 150 years of chaos and turmoil. After 146 B.C., the league lost much of its autonomy and authority when Thessaly became part of the province of Macedonia.
RP89867. Leaded bronze diassarion, Burrer E1a, 11 (A1/R11); BCD Thessaly II 914.1, RPC I 1425, SNG München 25b, SNG Evelpidis 1670, McClean 4994, F, right side of obverse legend unstruck or off flan, weight 8.303 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 0o, c. 23 - 22 B.C.; obverse ΘEΣΣAΛΩN ΣEBAΣTOΣ, bare head right; reverse ΣΩΣAN∆PO ΣΩΣAN∆POY (Sosandros, son of Sosandros [strategos]), Athena Itonia standing left, Nike presenting wreath in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield and spear at side behind on right, monograms left and right; scarce; $60.00 (€52.80)
 


Apollonia, Illyria, Greece, c. 229 - 80 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The cities of Apollonia and Dyrrhachium (Epidamnus) were established in the Archaic period by Corcyra and her mother city Corinth on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, in the Illyrian lands to the north of Epirus. When the Illyrian and Macedonian kingdoms threatened their prosperity in the last third of the 3rd century BC, they turned to the Romans for military support and subsequently assumed the privileged status of a Roman protectorate (Polybius 2.12.2, Appian, Ill. 7 – 8). As early as 228 BC, these two Adriatic cities concluded an alliance with the Roman Republic. They served as Adriatic naval bases for the Republic, and soon became centers of Roman operations in the interior of the Balkans. Essentially, the late drachms of Apollonia and Dyrrhachium were Roman controlled issues (Ujes-Morgan 2012). -- Illyrian Coinage From Thrace by Brendan Mac Gonagle.
GS92997. Silver drachm, Maier 31; BMC Thessaly p. 57, 11; SNG Cop 380; HGC 3.1 4 (S), VF, light marks, light toning, tight flan, obverse off center, tiny edge crack, weight 3.297 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 270o, Apollonia mint, magistrates Niken & Autoboulos, c. 229 - 80 B.C.; obverse NIKHN, cow left, head turned back toward suckling calf right; reverse AΠOΛ - AYTO-BOY-ΛOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; ex Quadriga Ancients; $60.00 (€52.80)
 


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, c. 229 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii. BMC calls the figure on the right side of the obverse a statue. Ceka identifies it as a female. The figure can be identified as Harpokrates by the a hem-hem crown and right index finger up to the lips.
MA93694. Silver drachm, Ceka 325 corr., BMC Thessaly p. 71, 94, weight 2.349 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, obverse MENIΣKOΣ, cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left; on right: Harpokrates standing facing wearing hemhem crown, finger to lips; reverse ∆YP − ΛY−KIΣ−KOY, double stellate pattern within double linear square with sides curved inward; $22.00 (€19.36)


Dyrrhachion, Illyria, Greece, Roman Protectorate, 229 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
After the decisive defeat of the Illyrians to Rome in 229 B.C., the new Roman rulers renamed the city. The original name, Epidamnos, was similar to the Latin word damnum, meaning "loss" or "harm." Dyrrhachion is Greek for "bad spine" or "difficult ridge," probably referring to imposing cliffs near the city. This type circulated alongside, and presumably at parity with, Roman Republican denarii.
MA93693. Silver drachm, cf. Ceka 320; BMC Thessaly p. 69, 62, weight 2.316 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, Dyrrhachium (Durrës, Albania) mint, 229 - 30 B.C.; obverse cow right, head turned back toward suckling calf left, MENIΣKOΣ above; reverse ∆YP − ∆IO−NY−ΣIOY, around, double stellate pattern within double linear square; $21.00 (€18.48)







CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES|

Amandry, M. Le Monnayage des Duovirs Corinthiens. (Paris, 1988).
American Numismatic Society Collections Database (ANSCD) - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Burrer, F. Münzprägung und geschichte des thessalischen Bundes in der römischen kaiserzeit bis auf Hadrian (31 v. Chr. - 138 n. Chr.). (Saarbrücken, 1993).
Classical Numismatic Group. The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Boiotia. Triton IX Auction, Session 1 (10 Jan 2006, New York).
Coleiro, E. "Maltese Coins of the Roman Period" in NC 1971.
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II: Macedon, Thrace...Southern Greece. (London, 1924).
Gardner, P. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thessaly to Aetolia. (London, 1883).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fitzwilliam Museum, Vol. II: The Greek mainland, the Aegaean islands, Crete. (Cambridge, 1926).
Grunauer-von Hoerschelmann, S. Die Münzprägung der Lakedaimonier. AMUGS VII. (Berlin, 1978).
Head, B. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Attica - Megaris - Aegina. (London, 1888).
Head, B. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Central Greece (Lorcris, Phocis, Boeotia, and Euboea). (London, 1884).
Head, B. Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Corinth, Colonies of Corinth, Etc. (London, 1889).
Head, B. On the chronological sequence of the coins of Boeotia. (London, 1881).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Greece:...Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 4. (Lancaster/London, 2014).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. & P. Gardner. Numismatic commentaries on Pausanias. (London, 1887).
Kroll, J. The Greek Coins. The Athenian Agora, vol. XXVI. (Princeton, 1993).
LHS Numismatics. Coins of Peloponnesos. The BCD Collection. Catalog of public auction 96, 8-9 May 2006. (Zurich).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Maier, A. "Die Silberprägung von Apollonia und Dyrrhachion" in NZ 41 (1908), pp. 1-33.
Nomos AG, Auction IV. Coins of Thessaly, The BCD Collection. (Zurich, 10 May 2011).
Numismatik Lanz. Münzen von Korinth: Sammlung BCD|. Auction 105. (Munich, 26 Nov 2001).
Rogers, E. The Copper Coinage of Thessaly. (London, 1932).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 12: Thessalien, Illyrien, Epirus, Korkyra. (Berlin, 2007).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 14: Attika, Megaris, Ägina. (Berlin, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 1, Collection Réna H. Evelpidis, Part 2: Macédoine-Thessalie-Illyrie-Epire-Corcyre. (Athens, 1975).
Svoronos, J. Les monnaies d'Athenes. (Munich, 1923-26).
Svoronos, J. Numismatique de la Crète ancienne. (Paris, 1890).
Wroth, W. Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Greek Coins of Crete and the Aegean Islands. (London, 1886).

Catalog current as of Saturday, September 21, 2019.
Page created in 2.672 seconds.
Roman Greece