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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Thrace & Moesia ▸ HadrianopolisView Options:  |  |  | 

Hadrianopolis, Thrace

Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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Hadrian refounded a Thracian tribal capital, changed its name to Hadrianopolis, developed it, adorned it with monuments, and made it the capital of the Roman province. The city is Edirne, Turkey today. From ancient times, the area around Edirne has been the site of no fewer than 16 major battles or sieges. Military historian John Keegan identifies it as "the most contested spot on the globe" and attributes this to its geographical location. Licinius was defeated there by Constantine I in 323, and Valens was killed by the Goths during the Battle of Adrianople in 378.
SH65237. Bronze AE 25, Jurukova p. 157 & pl. XXII, 244 (V137/R244); Mionnet, Suppl. II, 658; BMC Thrace -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, VF, green patina, weight 7.837 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse IOYΛIA ∆O CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, galley left with four oarsmen and steersman in stern; very rare; $400.00 (Ä356.00)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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The Romans, whose fondness for new gods increased with the influence of their foreign conquests, introduced the worship of Serapis within the walls of their city; not, however, without some opposition and resistance from the Senate. Through the influence of P. Victor an altar was erected to Serapis in the Circus Flaminii, and it quickly assumed the form of a superb temple which, after its Alexandrine prototype, was called the Serapeon. The principal Italian cities, never far behind Rome, soon imitated her example, and it was not long before the worship of Serapis was extended from Italy by the different colonies sent from that country into Asia Minor.
RP59690. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3842 - 3843 var. (obv. legend), BMC Thrace p. 120, 27 var. (same), SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 9.782 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Serapis standing half left, raising right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand; rare variety; $45.00 (Ä40.05)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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RP33641. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3408 var. (shorter ethnic), aVF, weight 8.411 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 225o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AV Λ CEΠT CEVHPOC Π or similar, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse HΓE T CTA BAPBAPOY A∆PIANOΠOΛ, distyle temple of Artemis, pyramidal roof, roof-line of three rows of decorated stone, Artemis advancing right within, bow in left hand, drawing arrow from quiver with right hand, hound leaping behind; attractive green patina, some cleaning scratches; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Brett, A.B. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Jurukova, Y. The Coinage of the Towns in Moesia Inferior and Thrace, 2nd-3rd centuries AD: Hadrianopolis. (Sophia. 1987).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins from the Lindgren Collection. (Quarryville, 1993).
Mionnet, T.E. Description de Mťdailles antiques grecques et romaines, Supplement 2: Thrace. (Paris, 1807-1837).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Poole, R.S. ed. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Thrace, etc. (London, 1877).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Italy, Milano, Civiche Raccolte Numismatiche, VI. Macedonia - Thracia, Part 3: Chersonesus Tauricus, Sarmatia, Thracia, Chersonesus Thraciae, Isole della Thracia. (Milan, 2000).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. II: Thrace (from Abdera to Pautalia). (Bourgas, Bulgaria, 2005).
Youroukova, Y. The Coinage of the Towns in Moesia Inferior and Thrace, 2nd-3rd centuries AD: Hadrianople. (Sophia. 1987).

Catalog current as of Saturday, September 23, 2017.
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Hadrianopolis