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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Animals ▸ Stag or DoeView Options:  |  |  | 

Stags or Deer on Ancient Coins

Piakos, Sicily, c. 425 - 400 B.C.

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Struck with unsigned dies by the ?Maestro della Foglia.? Rizzo was the first to suggest that this famed artist who engraved magnificent masterpieces for Katane, was also the engraver for the dies of this Piakos coinage. Other experts have agreed. This particular type might have been his very first work. Calciati dates the type to a possible period of transitory independence, 425 - 424 B.C., during the time of the first Carthaginian invasion of Sicily to shortly after Gela's conference. Other authorities date it as late as 400 B.C.
SH71341. Bronze tetras, Calciati III p. 198, 2; Rizzo pl. LX, 14; HGC 2 1101 (R1); SNG Cop -; SNG ANS -; SNG Mnchen -; SNG Morcom -, VF, weight 2.357 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 45o, Piakos mint, c. 425 - 400 B.C.; obverse PIAK (pellets are mark of value), laureate and horned head of a young river-god left; reverse hound right attacking fallen stag right, seizing her by the throat, barley kernel on left and another on right; rare; $330.00 (293.70)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos, 42 - 36 B.C.

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Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos (Pious, brother-loving) was the king of Cappadocia from c. 42 - 36 B.C. He was of Persian and Greek ancestry. His father was King Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia and his mother was Queen Athenais. He became king after his brother Ariobarzanes III Philoromaios was killed. His rule did not last long as Mark Antony of Rome removed and executed him, replacing him with Sisines of Komana, who became Archelaus of Cappadocia.
GB83642. Bronze AE 17, HGC 856 (R2); Simonetta p. 48, 4 (uncertain attribution), VF, nice green patina, weight 3.16 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia-Mazaka mint, 42 - 36 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis left, wearing diadem, bow and quiver on shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY, stag standing left; scarce; $135.00 (120.15)


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos, 42 - 36 B.C.

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Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos (Pious, brother-loving) was the king of Cappadocia from c. 42 - 36 B.C. He was of Persian and Greek ancestry. His father was King Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia and his mother was Queen Athenais. He became king after his brother Ariobarzanes III Philoromaios was killed. His rule did not last long as Mark Antony of Rome removed and executed him, replacing him with Sisines of Komana, who became Archelaus of Cappadocia.
GB83633. Bronze AE 15, HGC 856 (R2); Simonetta p. 48, 4 (uncertain attribution), F, encrustations, small flan, weight 2.584 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia-Mazaka mint, 42 - 36 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis left, wearing diadem, bow and quiver on shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY, stag standing left; scarce; $90.00 (80.10)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

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The animal appears to have the beard of a goat but on some examples branched antlers are clear. It is an odd deer.
RA84359. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 725cc, Hunter IV S21, RSC IV 70, RIC V S16, SRCV III 10643, VF, well centered on a tight flan, porosity, weight 4.111 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Rome mint, 267 - 268 A.D.; obverse COR SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back and top of head, thin crescent behind shoulders; reverse IVNONI CONS AVG (to Juno protector of the Empress), hind walking left, ∆ in exergue; $90.00 (80.10)


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 280 - 258 B.C.

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Ephesos, on the west coast of Anatolia, was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League. It was famous for its Temple of Artemis, completed around 550 B.C., one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The cult image of the Ephesian goddess has a mummy-like body with the feet placed close together, is many-breasted, and from each of her hands hangs a long fillet with tassels at the ends. At her side stands a stag raising its head to the image of the goddess. The usual symbols of this nature-goddess are the torch, stag, and the bee. Coins of Ephesos most frequently depict a bee on the obverse. The high-priest of the temple of Artemis was called the King Bee, while the virgin priestesses were called honey-bees (Melissae). Ephesus was one of the seven churches of Asia cited in the Book of Revelation and the Gospel of John may have been written there.
GB76117. Bronze AE 15, cf. BMC Ionia p. 58, 83 ff.; SNG Cop 268 - 269 var. (same), gF, nice green patina, weight 3.346 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 280 - 258 B.C.; obverse bee from above, within laurel wreath, E−Φ flanking head; reverse stag feeding right, quiver above, magistrate's name (obscure) in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Bargylia, Caria, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to myth, Bargylia, on the coast of Caria between Iasos and Myndus, was founded by Bellerophon in honor of his companion Bargylos, who had been killed by a kick from Pegasus. Near Bargylia was the Temple of Artemis Kindyas. Strabo reports the local belief that rain would fall around the temple but never touch it.
GB90110. Bronze AE 20, BMC Caria p. 72, 11; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mnchen -, F, green patina, weight 4.614 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 315o, Bargylia (Bogazici, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right; reverse BAPΓYΛ/HTΩN (in two lines, starting downward on right, ending downward on left), stag standing right; ex Ancient Imports; very rare; $50.00 (44.50)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Anemurium, Cilicia

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Anemurion was in the Roman province of Isauria on Cape Anamur the southernmost point of Asia Minor, only 64 km from Cyprus. Coins from its mint survive from Antiochus IV of Commagene (38-72) to Valerian (253-259). In 260, the Sassanians captured Anemurion, which sent it into decline for decades. It recovered and prospered until the mid-7th century, when it was nearly completely abandoned, probably because the Arab occupation of Cyprus made the coast unsafe. The acropolis occupies the actual cape, protected on three sides by steep cliffs and on the landward side by a wall with towers and zigzag reentrants. The fortifications and buildings are medieval, constructed in part utilizing Hellenistic elements. The lower town extended north of the citadel for at least 1500 meters. Discovered remains include a large theater, a small covered odeon or bouleuterion, three large public baths and one small one, decorated with mosaic floors (some converted to industrial use in late antiquity), four early Christian churches, an exedra possibly of a civil basilica (law court). Outside, there is an extensive necropolis of some 350 sepulchral monuments dating from the 1st to the early 4th century. Some included several rooms, a second story, and even an inner courtyard.
RP78017. Bronze AE 26, SNG Pfalz VI 381 (same obv. die); SNG Levante 519; BMC Lycaonia p. 43, 12; SNG BnF -; SNGvA -; Lindgren III 798 -; SNG Hunterian -, aF, porous, tiny edge cracks, weight 11.706 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 180o, Anemurion (near Anamur, Turkey) mint, autumn 255 - autumn 256 A.D.; obverse AV K Π ΛI - OVAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ANE-MOYPIEWN - ET Γ (year 3), mummiform cult statue of Artemis standing facing, veiled, holding branch in each hand, stag left at feet on left, stag's head turned back right; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; very rare; $50.00 (44.50)







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, February 22, 2017.
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Deer