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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Money||View Options:  |  |  | 

Money (Moneta)

Coins about...money! One of our favorite collecting themes. Roman propaganda often recorded largesses (represented by Liberalitas) on coins. She is usually depicted holding what was traditionally described as an abacus, a counting board. The object is also described as a tessera, type of banner, showing a number of painted marks equal to the number of aurei or denarii offered. Curtis Clay suggested it is actually a money shovel, a wooden shovel with shallow round depressions which could extract the exact number of coins needed from a chest. Another popular type is that of Moneta holding scales. One quite interesting coin is the Republic denarius of T.Carisius depicting mint tools: an anvil, tongs, a hammer and a die.


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Julia Domna was born in Emesa (now Homs), Syria in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS92345. Silver denarius, RIC IV S627 (S); RSC III 103; BMCRE V p. 104, 418; SRCV II 6591, F, off center, minor encrustations, edge cracks, weight 3.225 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 195 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse LIBERAL ē AVG, Liberalitas standing slightly left, polos or kalathos on head, counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; only one sale in the last two decades recorded on Coin Archives (an ex Forum coin!); rare; $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Geta, 209 - c. 26 December 211 A.D.

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Between 209 and their father's death in February 211, both brothers were shown as equally mature young men with a short full beard. Both sons were presented as equally suitable heirs to the throne, showing thus more "depth" to the dynasty. Between the death of Septimius Severus and the assassination of Geta, Caracalla's portraits did not change, while Geta was depicted with a long beard with hanging hairs much like his father, a strong indication of Geta's efforts to be seen as the "true" successor of his father.
RS86671. Silver denarius, RIC IV 88, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 65, SRCV II -, Choice EF, nearly as struck except for light toning, fantastic portrait, luster in recesses, perfect centering on a broad flan, some legend just a little weak, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.250 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 210 - 212 A.D.; obverse P SEPT GETA PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG V (the 5th liberality [distribution of gifts to the people] by the Emperor), Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; $240.00 SALE |PRICE| $216.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RS91584. Silver denarius, RIC IV 224; RSC III 165; BMCRE V p. 372, 90; Hunter III 15; SRCV II 6821, Choice EF, light tone on mint luster, excellent portrait, well centered, weight 3.225 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, Rome mint, 210 - 213 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Regina, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Moneta, holding the scales symbolic of equity and a cornucopia indicating plenty. This surname was given to Juno because she counseled the Romans to undertake only just wars in which case she promised that they would never be in want of money. The first mint in Rome was within the temple of Juno Moneta.
RS88834. Silver denarius, RIC II 256(d), RSC II 966, BMCRE III 680, Hunter II 223, Strack II 251, SRCV II 3507 var. (bare head, slight drapery), VF, excellent portrait, light toning, flow lines, light marks and scratches, small edge cracks, weight 3.277 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse MONETA AVG, Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1045; $135.00 SALE |PRICE| $122.00


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The reverse depicts a Commodus' forth liberalitas, a gift distribution of money to the people of Rome. A citizen is using his drapery to catch coins thrown from above - the coins are depicted by four pellets. Liberalitas holds a counting board, a money shovel with shallow holes in it, used to quickly distribute a specific number of coins to each recipient.
RB92465. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 563, Cohen III 320, BMCRE IV 650, Hunter II 163, SRCV II -, VF/F, excellent portrait, highlighting green and brown patina, tight flan, edge flaw, weight 19.715 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 190 A.D.; obverse M COMMOD ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT P P, laureate bust right; reverse LIBERAL AVG VII TR P XV IMP VIII COS VI, Liberalitas standing slightly left, head left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00







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Catalog current as of Sunday, January 26, 2020.
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