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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Hellenistic Monarchies ▸ Pontic KingdomView Options:  |  |  | 

Pontic Kingdom

Olba, Cilicia Tracheia, Marcus Antonius Polemo, King, c. 64 - 74 A.D.

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All three references listed, refer to the exact same coin, plus RPC identifies a second example. We were unable to find another, making this is only the the third specimen of this type known to Forum. In 63 A.D., the Pontic part of the Polemon lands was made part of Roman Galatia. Sometime afterward, Marcus Antonius Polemo (III?) ruled as king over part of Cilicia including Olbia and, from this coin, also Lalassis and Kennatis. In the late 60's, he struck coins as king with portraits of Nero and Galba. RPC I notes similarity between this coin type and a Domitian caesar type and dates this coin early in the Flavian period. Certainly it dates before 74 A.D. when Vespasian absorbed part of Cilicia Tracheia, likely including Lalassis and Kennatis, into Roman Cilicia.
GB85938. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 3742, SNG Levante 644, Staffieri Olba 36, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, BMC Lycaonia -, VF, green patina, very light marks, earthen deposits and corrosion, some legend weak, reverse off center, weight 2.873 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 0o, Cilicia, Olba mint, c. 70 A.D.; obverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ M ANT ΠOΛEMΩNOΣ, club; reverse KOINON ΛAΛAΣΣEΩN KAI KENNATΩN, harpa on globe; only the 3rd known to Forum; extremely rare; $400.00 (340.00)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Chabakta, Pontos

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Chabakta was an important town within the territory of Amisos. Quite a few towns first struck coins under Mithradates VI, including Amaseia, Abonutheichos, Chabakta, Comana, Laodiceia, and Taulara. The cities issued the same types indicating central control over the mints.
GB76955. Bronze AE 24, SNG Stancomb 714; SNG BM 1258; SNG Cop IV 204; Rec Gen p. 77, 1; BMC Pontus -; SNGvA -; Laffaille -, aVF, well centered, uneven green patina, weight 10.718 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Chabakta mint, c. 100 - 70 B.C.; obverse head of Perseus right, wearing Phrygian helmet with griffin's head crest and diadem; reverse Pegasos grazing left, monogram left, XABAKTΩN in exergue; very rare; $160.00 (136.00)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB79948. Bronze AE 24, BMC Pontus p. 18, 60 ff. var.; SNG BM 1212 ff. var.; SNG Stancomb 701 ff. var.; SNG Cop 158 f. var.; SNGvA 62 var.; HGC 7 239 (S) (all var. monogram), gVF, attractive, centered on a tight flan, weight 12.653 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse AMIΣOY, Pegasos grazing left, monogram below; $160.00 (136.00)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77161. Bronze AE 25, BMC Pontus p. 18, 61; SNG BM 1213 var.; SNG Stancomb 702 f. var.; SNG Cop 158 var.; Rec Gen p. 69, 32 var.; HGC 7 237 (S) (all var. right monogram), VF, attractive coin, coarse green patina, weight 13.134 g, maximum diameter 24.6 mm, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse Pegasos grazing left, AMIΣOY over two monograms in exergue; $120.00 (102.00)


Pontos, 130 - 100 B.C.

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An enigmatic and very rare coin with unusual curious types.
GB72869. Bronze AE 12, SNG BM 984; SNG Stancomb 653; Lindgren III 154; HGC 7 317, aVF, weakly struck, weight 1.264 g, maximum diameter 11.7 mm, Pontos, uncertain mint, 130 - 100 B.C.; obverse horse-head right, with star of eight points and central pellet on neck; reverse comet star of seven points, central pellet, and tail to right; very rare; $110.00 (93.50)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Amisos, Pontos

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77037. Bronze AE 23, SNG BM 1216; BMC Pontus p. 18, 60 ff. var. (no A); SNG Stancomb 701 ff. var. (controls); SNG Cop 158 f. var. (same); SNGvA 62 var. (same), VF, nice style, weight 12.6 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Mithradates VI as Perseus right, wearing diadem and Phrygian helmet; reverse AMIΣOY, Pegasos grazing left, monograms left, monogram and A below; $105.00 (89.25)


Pontic Kingdom, Mithradates VI Eupator the Great, c. 120 - 63 B.C., Anonymous Coinage

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Mithradates VI Megas (the Great) was king of Pontus in northern Anatolia from about 119 to 63 B.C. He was of both Greek and Persian origin, claiming descent from both Alexander the Great and King Darius I of Persia. Mithradates is remembered as one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the so-called Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. After Mithradates VI was at last defeated by Pompey and in danger of capture by Rome, he attempted suicide. The poison failed because he had taken daily doses to build immunity. He then made his bodyguard and friend, Bituitus, kill him by the sword.
GB84575. Bronze AE 26, cf. HGC 7 310 (S), SNG Stancomb 649, SNG BM 973, SNG Cop 232 (all SNG refs. with same countermarks, none with this monogram), gF, dark patina, thick heavy flan as usual for the type, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 19.920 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, uncertain (Amisos?) mint, c. 130 - 100 B.C.; obverse male head left in a satrapal leather bashlik cap; countermarks: helmet in round punch, gorgoneion in round punch, fulmen (thunderbolt) in a rectangular punch; reverse star of eight rays, bow facing inward, monogram between rays; scarce; $95.00 (80.75)


Pharnakeia, Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.

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Pharnakeia (Giresun, Turkey today) was founded on the Black Sea coast as Kerasous by residents of Kotyora. The city was renamed Pharnakeia, by Pharnaces I of Pontus after he captured the city in 183 B.C., and it was called by that name as late as the second century A.D. The inhabitants lived mostly on fishing but also mined ore and cut timber in the adjacent mountain areas. During his war against Sulla, Mithradates' sisters resided in the city.

According to Pliny, the cherry was first exported from Pharnakeia to Europe in Roman times. The English word cherry, French cerise, and Spanish cereza, and Latin cerasus, were all derived from original name of the city, Kerasous.
GB66854. Bronze AE 20, SNG Stancomb 724; SNG BM 1279; Rec Gen p. 138, 4; SNG Cop 224, gVF, weight 8.220 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 0o, Pharnakeia mint, under Mithradates VI of Pontos, 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Zeus right; reverse eagle standing left, head right, wings open, monogram left, ΦAPNAKEIAΣ below; rare city; $90.00 (76.50)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 100 B.C., Time of Mithradates VI Eupator

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB67881. Bronze AE 26, BMC Pontus p. 20, 80, SNG Ashmolean 65, SNG Stancomb 669, SNG BM 1135, SNG Cop 131, SNGvA 58, HGC 7 236 (S), aVF, weight 20.171 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 100 B.C.; obverse head right, wearing bashlyk; reverse AMI−ΣOY, quiver with strap; scarce; $45.00 (38.25)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 100 - 85 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB72621. Brass AE 19, SNG BM 1148; SNG Stancomb 676; SNG Cop 148; SNGvA 64; BMC Pontus p. 17, 40; SGCV II 3643; HGC 7 241, aVF, weight 7.414 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 85 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of young Ares right; reverse AMI−ΣOY, sword in sheath with strap; $36.00 (30.60)







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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 21, 2017.
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Pontic Kingdom