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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins||View Options:  |  |  |   

Judean and Biblical Coins

Syracuse, Sicily, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.

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Following Heron's death, democracy was restored in 466 B.C. Similar to at Athens, the polis was governed by a council and popular assembly with an executive consisting of elected generals or strategoi. Syracuse fought against Athens 427 - 424 B.C. and again 415 - 413 B.C.; ultimately Syracuse was victorious. With further reforms by Diocles, the democratic nature of Syracuse's political structure was further strengthened.
SH89722. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series XX, 698 (V344/R476); SNG ANS 233 (same dies); BMC Sicily p. 161, 115 (same); Weber 1592 (same); HGC 2 1322 (S), VF, elegant nymph well centered on a tight flan, obverse strike weak and crowded by tight flan, weight 16.854 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 425 - 420 B.C.; obverse male charioteer driving a walking quadriga to right, wearing a long chiton, goad in his right hand, reins in both hands, Nike above flying left to crown the charioteer; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION upward on right, Head of Arethusa right, her hair in a sakkos and an ampyx, bound with olive-wreath and a double decorated fillet, wearing earring and a necklace with a lion's head, four dolphins swimming around; scarce; $1260.00 (€1108.80)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Alexandria Troas, Troas

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The representation of the decurions of Alexandria depicted on the reverse of this type is unique within the Roman provincial series. The decurions were members of municipal senates responsible for procuring funds for new public works, festivities and games, as well as for welfare networks. Their fiscal responsibilities also extended to the collecting of imperial taxes, for which they were expected to cover any shortfalls.
RP87204. Bronze AE 22, RPC IX 432 (12 spec.); Bellinger A409; SNG Çanakkale 376; BMC Troas p. 27, 145; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, aVF, dark green patina, reverse slightly off center, tiny encrustations, some legend weak, edge cracks, weight 4.586 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, Jun/Jul 251 - Jul/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse IMP C VIBI TRIBO GALLVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse The curia decurionum of Alexandria in session: nine men wearing togas seated in a semicircle, two outer men seated on curule chairs, two in center holding short staffs, AVG above, two steps below, ALEXAND on upper step, decorative pattern on lower step, TROADA in exergue; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 40 (28 Oct 2017), lot 429; very rare; $1170.00 (€1029.60)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Sprinkler Flask, 3rd - 4th Century A.D.

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Dropper bottles, such as this one, were filled with scented oil or perfume. The constriction in the neck made it easy to dispense the expensive contents one drop at a time. The swirled design was created by blowing the body into a ribbed mold, removing the glass from the mold, then blowing it again while twisting the bubble. The most unusual feature on this flask is the recessed neck, pushed into the body, a very rare feature.
AG20821. cf. Corning II 621, ROM Glass 282, Newark Museum 152, Wolf Collection 154, Carnegie Museum 213, Choice, complete and intact, attractive iridescence, globular body sprinkler flask, transparent blue glass, 11.3 cm (4 3/8") tall, 4.4 cm (1 3/4") widest diameter, beautifully made, mold-blown swirled ribs, recessed cylindrical neck, everted funnel mouth, rolled and folded in rim, kicked bottom, no pontil mark; from a Florida dealer; $1000.00 (€880.00)


Judah, Macedonian or Ptolemaic Rule, Satrap Hezekiah, c. 333 - 301 B.C.

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Josephus identifies Hezekiah as the High Priest of the Jews who offered friendship to Ptolemy I after his conquest of Palestine. Josephus mentions Hezekiah was sixty years old at the time of Ptolemy. Mildenberg identifies the head right on the obverse of this type as Ptolemy I.
SL89836. Silver half ma'ah, Hendin 1066; Meshorer TJC 25; Meshore AJC I 12; Mildenberg Yehud p. 189 & pl. 22, 23; HGC 10 452 (R1 - R2), NGC NGC XF, strike 2/5, surface 3/5 (4283488-002), weight 0.189 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse male head (Ptolemy I?) right; reverse forepart of winged and horned lynx left; Aramaic inscription lower right: YHZQYH (Hezekiah); NGC certified with photo certificate of authenticity, not in a plastic holder; rare; $800.00 (€704.00)


Byzantine Empire, Philippicus Bardanes, 4 November 711 - June 713 A.D.

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Philippicus Bardanes was from a prominent Armenian family in Pergamum and a general of the Opsikion Theme army under Justinian II. While Justinian II ruled in a bloodthirsty frenzy of revenge, the Bulgars ravaged the empire right up to the city walls. Bardanes arrived at Constantinople with the army. But, instead of fighting the Bulgars he seized the throne. An ineffective ruler, Philippicus engaged in destructive internal religious disputes while the external threats grew and Bulgars and Arabs continued to raid Byzantine territory. In less than two years, he was deposed in a coup, blinded and exiled to a monastery.
BZ82676. Bronze follis, Anastasi 374, SBCV 1460A, Hahn MIB 24, DOC II part 2,, -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, Morrisson BnF -, F, ragged flan, weight 3.824 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 4 Nov 711 - Jun 713 A.D.; obverse Philippicus standing facing, wearing helmet and military attire, eagle-tipped scepter in left hand, globus cruciger in right hand; reverse large M flanked by two stars, monogram above, SCL in exergue; very rare; $765.00 (€673.20)


Vetranio, 1 March - 25 December 350 A.D.

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In 312 A.D., Constantine the Great dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin, "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL92012. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 287 (S), LRBC II 1174, Voetter 9, SRCV V 18905, Cohen VIII 4 (25 Fr.), EF, one of the finest Vetranio bronzes we have ever seen, weight 4.857 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N VETRANIO P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Vetranio standing left in military dress, labarum (Christogram standard) in right hand, scepter in left hand, crowned by Victory behind, A left, •ASIS• (A resembling H) in exergue; ex FORVM (2009); ex Scott Collection; ex H.D. Rauch auction 75 (6 May 2005), lot 923; scarce; $750.00 (€660.00)


Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Small Glass Bowl, c. Mid 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

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In his Satyricon, the satirist Petronius’ tells the story of a Roman glass-maker who invented flexible glass and was granted an audience with the Roman emperor Tiberius. After Tiberius examined a glass cup, he handed it back to the glass-maker, who threw it to the floor. The emperor was shocked, but the cup did not shatter and was only dented. The glass-maker beat the glass with a little hammer, and in no time, the cup regained its original shape. Tiberius asked if anybody else knew how to make this flexible glass, to which the glass-maker replied, no. The glass maker was expecting a reward for his invention, but instead, Tiberius had him executed, thus taking the secret of making flexible glass with him to his grave. Tiberius executed the glass-maker because he was afraid flexible glass would cause gold to be devalued. Believe it or not, Pliny tells this same story in his, Natural History!
AG20812. cf. Harter A17, Isings 18, Newark Museum 101, Bomford 98, Choice, intact, areas of weathering and iridescence, very tiny chips in the edge, small glass bowl, mold pressed thin pale green transparent glass; 13.8 cm (4 3/8") diameter, 3.9 cm (1 1/2") high; spherical shell, curving outward toward edge, rolled up and in lip with ground edge, bottom slightly concave, ornamented with light wheel-incised horizontal bands on exterior; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; $900.00 SALE |PRICE| $720.00


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21

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Jesus, referring to a "penny" asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
SH91408. Silver denarius, Giard Lyon, group 4, 150; RIC I 30 (C); BMCRE I 48; RSC II 16a; SRCV I 1763, VF, attractive old collection toning, bumps and scratches, reverse a little off center, weight 3.641 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 150o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 18 - 35 A.D.; obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with decorated legs, a single line below, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, feet on footstool; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $700.00 (€616.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Jar with a Flaring Mouth and Double Rim, Late 3rd - 5th Century A.D.

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This is a rather plain, but finely made jar - except for the unusual "double rim." The double rim was made by folding to create a flange immediately below the rim.
AG20811. cf. Corning I 284, Isings 133, Choice, complete and intact, attractive iridescence, spots of tan weathering, glass jar with flaring mouth and double rim, well made, thin transparent blue-green glass, 6.7 cm 2 (2 5/8") high, 7.2 mm (2 3/4') maximum diameter, short concave neck, flaring mouth, horizontal flange around the underside of the rim immediately below the rolled and folded in lip, kicked bottom with pontil mark; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; $650.00 (€572.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Sprinkler Flask, c. Late 3rd - 4th Century A.D.

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Dropper bottles, such as this one, were filled with scented oil or perfume. The constriction in the neck made it easy to dispense the expensive contents one drop at a time. The swirled design was created by blowing the body into a ribbed mold, removing the glass from the mold, then blowing it again while twisting the bubble.
AG21021. cf. ROM Glass 282, Isings 104b, Newark Museum 80-82, Oppenländer 493, Choice, complete and intact, areas of light weathering, sprinkler flask, well made free-blown, pale blue-green transparent glass, 8.5 cm (3 3/8") high, 6.3 cm (2 1/2") diameter, globular body with mold blown ribbing twisted spirally, short tubular neck with tooled slight constriction at base, internal washer-like sprinkler diaphragm at base of neck, flaring funnel mouth, rolled tubular and folded in rim, kicked bottom with pontil mark; from the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years; $800.00 SALE |PRICE| $640.00




  







Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
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Judaean & Biblical Coins