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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Mysia| ▸ |Other Mysia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Mysia (Other Cities and Uncertain Mints)

Mysia is the northwestern region of Anatolia (Asia Minor) located on the shore of the Propontis (Marmara Sea) between Troas and Bithynia. The chief physical features of Mysia are the two mountains, Mount Olympus at (7600 ft) in the north and Mount Temnus in the south. The most important cities were Pergamon in the valley of the Caïcus, and Cyzicus on the Propontis. The whole sea-coast was studded with Greek towns, several of which were places of considerable importance; thus the northern portion included Parium, Lampsacus and Abydos, and the southern Assos, Adramyttium. Further south, on the Eleatic Gulf, were Elaea, Myrina and Cyme.


Adramytion, Mysia, 2nd Century B.C.

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Adramytteion was a coastal town northwest of Pergamon in Mysia, said to be founded by Adramys, brother of King Kroisos. In classical times, Adramyttium received settlers from Athens and Delos. It later belonged to the Roman province of Asia, whose capital was Ephesus. The ancient city with its harbor has entirely disappeared. Paul, while being taken as prisoner from Caesarea to Rome, embarked upon a ship belonging to Adramyttium (Acts 27:2). It conveyed him only to Myra, in Lycia, from which he sailed on an Alexandrian ship for Italy.
GB89047. Bronze AE 22, von Fritze Mysiens 32, SNG BnF 14, SNG Cop 4, BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, VF, well centered, dark patina, earthen deposits, scratches, spots of light corrosion, weight 7.863 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, magistrate Nikolochos, 2nd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left, hair tied at the back with two locks falling down neck, two A∆PAMYTHNΩN below; reverse cornucopia between two pilei (caps of the Dioskouroi) with stars above, NIKO-LO/XOY (magistrate) in two lines above and below caps, monogram lower right; ex Gerhard Rohde Ancient Coins; rare; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Priapos, Mysia, 3rd - 1st Century B.C.

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Unpublished in the references examined and the only example of the type known to Forum.

Priapos (Karabiga, Turkey today) is located on the Mysian coast, on a small east-facing bay at the mouth of the Biga River, about a third of the distance from ancient Parium to Cyzicus. Strabo mentions that the area produced fine wine and that the god Priapus gave the town its ancient name. Thucydides mentions the town as a naval station. In 334 B.C., the town surrendered to Alexander the Great without contest, prior to the Battle of Granicus. Deities worshiped there included Demeter, Apollo, Artemis, and Dionysus. Under the Eastern Roman Empire, the town was known as Pegae and was the site of a Byzantine fortress.
GB83634. Bronze AE 13, cf. BMC Mysia p. 177, 14 (AE20, full ethnic 2 lines, bucranium); SNG Tüb 2500 (same); SNG BnF 2410 (similar); SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Lindgren -, VF, green patina, corrosion, weight 2.400 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 0o, Priapos (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Demeter right, veiled and wreathed with grain; reverse ΠPIA within grain wreath; extremely rare; $110.00 (€96.80)
 


Adramytion, Mysia, 4th Century B.C.

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According to the Acts of the Apostles, whilst en route to Rome, St. Paul departed Caesarea Maritima on a ship from the city of Adramyttium which took him to Myra in Lycia.
GB87701. Bronze AE 10, SNG BnF 1, SNGvA 7192; Klein 247, Waddington 607, Traité II 2, 2515, BMC Mysia -, VF, well centered on a tight flan, earthen deposits, weight 0.947 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 90o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse A∆PA, forepart of Pegasos right, with archaic style curved wings, grain ear right below; scarce; $105.00 (€92.40)
 


Gambrion, Mysia, c. 350 - 200 B.C.

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The name of Gambrion is seen first in the book of Anabasis of Xenophon which discusses the region in 399 B.C. At that time the ruler of the city was Gorgion and the earliest coins of the city bear his name. Gambrion was an important town during the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom in the third and second centuries B.C.
GB91992. Bronze AE 17, SNG BnF 908; SNG Cop 146; SNGvA 1086; BMC Mysia p. 62, 2; AMNG IV p. 143, 420; von Fritze Mysiens, p. 143, 20; SGCV II 3871, VF, dark green patina, scratches, scattered porosity, weight 4.164 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, Gambrion (Poyracik, Izmir, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse star with 12 rays, alternating smaller and larger, around central pellet, Γ−A−M between rays; $90.00 (€79.20)
 


Priapus, Mysia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Palinurus Elephas is a spiny lobster, which is commonly caught in the Mediterranean Sea. Its common names include European spiny lobster, crayfish or cray (in Ireland), common spiny lobster, Mediterranean lobster and red lobster. Claws are much smaller than those of the American lobsters.
GB76833. Bronze AE 19, cf. BMC Mysia p. 176, 3 - 5; SNG Cop 548; SNGvA 1435; SNG Tüb 2499; SNG BnF 2401 - 2402, F, centered on a tight flan, green patina, earthen encrustation, pin-prick pitting, weight 5.014 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 90o, Priapus (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠPIAΠHNΩN, lobster or crayfish right, control symbol below (off flan); rare; $85.00 (€74.80)
 


Priapus, Mysia, 3rd Century B.C.

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Palinurus Elephas is a spiny lobster, which is commonly caught in the Mediterranean Sea. Its common names include European spiny lobster, crayfish or cray (in Ireland), common spiny lobster, Mediterranean lobster and red lobster. Claws are much smaller than those of the American lobsters.
GB84157. Bronze AE 19, cf. BMC Mysia p. 176, 3 - 5; SNG Cop 548; SNGvA 1435; SNG Tüb 2499; SNG BnF 2401 - 2402, aF, well centered, rough, weight 4.392 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 90o, Priapus (Karabiga, Turkey) mint, 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΠPIAΠHNΩN, lobster or crayfish right, uncertain control symbol below; rare; $50.00 (€44.00)
 


Gambrion, Mysia, c. 350 - 250 B.C.

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Gambrium (or Gambrion, Gambreium or Gambreion) was a town of ancient Aeolis and of Mysia, quite close to Pergamum. It is on a hill named Hisarlik in the Bakirçay valley and very close to modern town of Poyracik in Izmir province, Turkey. The name of Gambrion is seen first in the book of Anabasis of Xenophon which discusses the region in 399 B.C. At that time the ruler of the city was Gorgion and the earliest coins of the city bear his name. Gambrion peaked during the rule of the Pergamon Kingdom in the third and second centuries B.C.
GB91993. Bronze AE 18, SNG BnF 906; SNG Cop 154; BMC Mysia p. 63, 12, VF, dark green patina, light scratches, porosity, weight 3.625 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Gambrion (Poyracik, Izmir, Turkey) mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse bull butting left, star above, ΓAM in exergue; $50.00 (€44.00)
 


Atarneus, Mysia, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

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Atarneus, also known as Atarna, was in the region of Aeolis but most numismatic references place the city in Mysia. It was on the mainland opposite the island of Lesbos, on the road from Adramyttium to the plain of the Caicus. Atarneus was founded by Cilicians during the 5th century B.C., it received many Chian colonists. The city is best known for its association with Aristotle. After the death of his father, Aristotle was cared for and educated by Proxenus of Atarneus, possibly his uncle. At the Academy, Aristotle made friends with Hermias, who became the ruler of Atarneus. After the death of Plato, Aristotle stayed with Hermias, and married Hermias' niece Pythia. Atarneus was probably deserted completely in the 1st century A.D. due to an epidemic.
GB89007. Bronze AE 10, cf. SNG BnF 130; SNG Cop 27; Fritze Mysiens 346; BMC Mysia p. 14, 6; SNGvA -, aF, tight irregular flan, corrosion, weight 0.918 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 90o, Aiolis, Atarneus (Kale Tepe, NE of Dikili, Turkey) mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ATA, horse forepart right; rare city; $40.00 (€35.20)
 







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REFERENCES|

ANS Collections Database - http://numismatics.org/search/
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow. (Oxford, 2004).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. (Istanbul, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 3: Canakkale Museum, Vol. 1, Roman Provincial Coins of Mysia, Troas, etc. (Istanbul, 2009).
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Catalog current as of Saturday, September 21, 2019.
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