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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Thrace & Moesia| ▸ |Other Thrace & Moesia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Greek Coins from Other Moesia, Thrace, and Black Sea Cities

Phasis, Colchis, c. 425 - 320 B.C.

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Phasis, Colchis (near modern Poti, Georgia) was on the eastern Black Sea coast at the mouth of the river Phasis. It was a Milesian Greek colony founded in the 7th or 6th century B.C., probably a mixed Hellenic–barbarian city in which Greek settlers coexisted peacefully with natives. In mythology, Jason went to Phasis to find the Golden Fleece. Phasis appears in numerous Classical sources. Strabo and Pliny identify it as important on the trade route from India to the Black Sea. Hippocrates calls it an emporion, "a trading place." Phasis came under Roman control during the Third Mithridatic War. In 65 B.C., Pompey met the admiral of his Euxine fleet at Phasis. The name "Phasis" is the origin of the word "pheasant."Kolchis_Map
GB91700. Billon half siglos, SNG Stancomb 633, BMC Black Sea 1014, SNG Cop 98, SNG Delepierre 2469, Hind 7, HGC 7 215 (C), gVF, attractive old cabinet toning, small edge splits, half of obv. and rev. borders off flan, weight 2.115 g, maximum diameter 11.8 mm, die axis 0o, Phasis (near Poti, Georgia) mint, c. 425 - 320 B.C.; obverse archaic female head right; reverse bull head and neck right; scarce; $270.00 (€237.60)
 


Ainos, Thrace, c. 440 - 412 B.C.

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Aenus, Enez, Turkey today, was on the southeastern coast of Thrace, near the mouth of the Hebrus River, not far from the Melas Gulf (modern Gulf of Saros), which is formed by the Thracian Chersonesus to the east. The city was said to be founded (or at least settled) by Aeolian migrants from Lesbos. Its mythical and eponymous founder was said to be Aeneus, a son of the god Apollo and father of Cyzicus. Another mythical ruler, named Poltys, son of Poseidon, entertained Heracles when he came to Aenus. In the Iliad, Homer mentions that the leaders of Troy's Thracian allies, Acamas and Peiros, came from Aenus.
GS87868. Silver diobol, May Ainos 176 ff., AMNG II 303, SNG Cop 405, SNG Lockett 1164, Pozzi 1033, McClean 3892, VF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, porous, weight 1.133 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 90o, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, c. 440 - 412 B.C.; obverse head of Hermes right, wearing petasos; reverse AIN, goat standing to right, coiled snake (control symbol) lower right, all withing incuse square; ex Pegasi Numismatics, ex Beast Coins; scarce; $230.00 (€202.40)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Sestos, Thracian Chersonesos

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Sestos was an ancient town of the Thracian Chersonesos, the modern Gallipoli peninsula in European Turkey. Situated on the Hellespont opposite Abydos, it was an Aeolian colony, founded by settlers from Lesbos, and the home of Hero in the legend of Hero and Leander.
CM89992. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1740 (2 spec.; RPC online 6 spec., 2 with c/m), Varbanov III 2967 (R7); c/m: Howqego 460 (1 spec., same coin type, same placement), VF, tight flan, reverse a bit flattened opposite countermark, weight 3.485 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Sestos mint, obverse CEBACTOY, bare head right, countermark: six pointed star in a 7mm round punch; reverse CHCTI, lyre; very rare; $180.00 (€158.40)
 


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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Most finds of this type are from Bulgaria, suggesting a mint in Thrace. This type is found both with and without central depressions, indicating it was struck both before and after the coinage reform of 265 B.C., after which central depressions (dimples) became a feature of Ptolemaic coinage. This example is pre-reform.
GP86417. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos 351, SNG Cop 100, Lorber CPE B310 var. (post reform), SNG Milan -, Weiser -, Noeske -, BMC Ptolemies -, Malter -, aVF, obv. die break from nose to edge, rev. well centered on a tight flan, bumps, marks, corrosion, without central cavities, weight 5.472 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 270o, uncertain (Thracian?) mint, pre-reform, 285 - 265 B.C.; obverse veiled and diademed bust of Arsinoe II right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on fulmen (thunderbolt), head left, wings open, ∆I over (AX monogram) left; see CNG e-auction 92 (23 Jun 2004), lot 64, for another specimen with the same obverse die break; rare; $160.00 (€140.80)
 


Bizya, Thrace, 2nd Century A.D.

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The head on the obverse and the figure on the reverse are variously identified in references and sales listings as Dionysos, Poseidon, Zeus, Silenos, or even Marsyas. Most of the references do not have plate coins and perhaps they are other types. The resemblance of the head to Pertinax or Septimius Severus indicate a Severan era date.
RP89907. Bronze AE 20, cf. BMC Thrace p. 88, 1; Mionnet Supp. II 163; Bernhart Dionysos 1386; Hunterian I p. 438, 1; Jurukova Bizye -; SNG Cop -; Lindgren I -, F, green patina, rough, porous, weight 6.330 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 180o, Bizya (Vize, Turkey) mint, c. 190 - 230 A.D.; obverse head of Dionysos right (resembling Pertinax or Septimius Severus), wreathed with ivy; reverse BIZYHNΩN, Dionysos standing facing, head left, pouring from a diota (two handled cup) in right hand, thyrsos in left hand; very rare; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Agathopolis, Thrace, c. 255 - 240 B.C.

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Agathopolis was an unimportant Greek colony in Thrace. Its site is uncertain, but it may have been modern Ahtopol the southernmost Black Sea port in Bulgaria. The city minted coins only for a short time in the mid third century and all coins of the city are very rare. In 279 B.C., Galatian Celts who overran Thrace and established a Celtic kingdom at Tylis. The Seleukid king, Antiochus II (r. 261 - 246) participated in an expedition into Thrace, including a siege a Cypsela (modern Ipsala). Large numbers of his coins struck at Sardis are found at Cabyle. Stancomb suggest the Thracian dynast Adaeus may have been an adherent of Antiochus II left behind when the Syrian garrisons withdrew. Stancomb notes, Jouroukova identified similarities between the coins of Agathopolis and the coins of Adaeus. Stancomb in "Agathopolis: a mint on the Black Sea coast" in Studies to Martin Price suggests the coins naming Adaeus may have been struck at Cypsela and the "regal" portrait on the similar coins of Agathopolis may be of Adaeus.
GB93057. Bronze AE 16, Stancomb Agathopolis p. 335 & pl. 69, 1; SNG Dreer 118; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; BMC Thrace -; SNG Tübingen -; Weber -; McClean -; Traité -, VF, some roughness, weight 2.946 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Agathopolis mint, c. 255 - 240 B.C.; obverse male head (Adaeus?) right, wearing taenia; reverse AΓA in olive wreath; very rare; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Handbook of Coins of Macedon and Its Neighbors, Volume 3, Part II

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Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.. Part II Thrace, Skythia, and Taurike, sixth to first centuries BC. With a series preface by D. Scott Van Horn and Bradley R. Nelson.
BK17140. Handbook of Coins of Macedon and Its Neighbors, Volume 3, Part II, by Oliver D. Hoover, hardcover, new in wrapper, lxxii and 338 pages, 2 maps, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $65.00 (€57.20)
 







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REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Corpus Nummorum Thracorum - http://www.corpus-nummorum.eu/
de Callataÿ, F. L'histoire des guerres Mithridatiques vue par les monnaies. (Louvain-La-Neuve, 1997).
Fischer-Bossert, W. "Die Lysimachaeier des Skostokos" in RBN CLI (2005).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. II. (London, 1924).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1935).
Hind, J. "The Types on the Phasian Silver Coins of the Fifth-Fourth Centuries BC (The 'Kolkhidki' of Western Georgia)" in NC 165 (2005), pp. 1 - 14, pl. 1.
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of the Islands: Adriatic, Ionian, Thracian, Aegean, & Carpathian Seas, 6th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 6. (Lancaster, PA, 2010).
Jurukova, J. Die Münzprägung von Bizye. (Berlin, 1981).
Klein, D. Sammlung von griechischen Kleinsilbermünzen und Bronzen. Nomismata 3. (Milano, 1999).
Komnick, H. Die Munzpragung von Nicopolis ad Mestum. (Akademie Verlag, 2003).
Liampi, K. "The mint of Phagres" in NK 10 (1991).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Austria, Klagenfurt, Landesmuseum für Kärnten, Sammlung Dreer, Part 3: Thracien-Macedonien-Päonien. (Klagenfurt, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 7: Taurische Chersonesos, Sarmatien, Dacia, Moesia Superior, Moesia Inferior. (Berlin, 1985).
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Waggoner, N.M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen. ACNAC 5. (New York, 1983).

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Moesia, Thrace and Black Sea