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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial| ▸ |Roman Hispania||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins of Hispania

Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89567. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, nice VF, highlighting earthen fill patina, light scratches, weight 3.928 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; ex Lusitania Ancient Coins; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Late 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89050. Bronze quadrans, Villaronga-Benages 2152; Villaronga p. 337, 48; SNG BM Spain 1354; SNG Cop 217, Choice F, broad flan, attractive patina, scattered porosity, weight 3.827 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 210o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, late 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed male head right; reverse boar standing right on exergue line, star above, "Kastilo" in Iberian script in exergue, linear border; $160.00 SALE |PRICE| $144.00
 


Indigets, Untikesken, Emporion, Iberia, c. 130 - 90 B.C.

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Early in the 2nd century B.C., Emporion began striking bronze coinage with the Iberian inscription UTIKENSKEN, which refers to the Indigets tribe that inhabited the town and its surrounding area. The earliest coins were struck at a one ounce standard of 1/12 Roman pound. In the mid 2nd Century B.C., the standard changed to 1/15th of the Roman pound. Some of these coins were marked XV, most were marked with an Iberian EI mark, which means 15. The names of magistrates were added to some coins in the second half of the 2nd century B.C. Weights were gradually reduced until coinage with Iberian inscriptions ended in the 1st century B.C.
GB88304. Bronze as, reduced Roman ounce standard, Villaronga-Benages 1043 (same dies), Villaronga CNH 50, cf. SNG BM Spain 522, F, dark patina with attractive highlighting earthen deposits, soft strike, weak reverse, weight 14.462 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Emporion (Empúries, Catalonia, Spain) mint, c. 130 - 90 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena-Minerva right, Iberian mark before: EI (15); reverse Pegasos springing right, head modified, laurel wreath above rump, palm frond outer right, Iberian inscription above exergue line: UTIKESKEN; ex Jenceck Historical Enterprise; $120.00 SALE |PRICE| $108.00
 


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 206 B.C.

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In order to force Hannibal to retreat from Italy, Scipio Africanus attacked Carthaginian Spain and took Carthago Nova in 209 B.C. References most often identify this type as Punic, struck before 209 B.C., but they also note that the head is "Roman style." Some authorities believe, as we do, that this type may have been struck after 209, under Roman rule. Carthaginian coins sometimes depicted Barcid generals. This coin possibly depicts the Roman general Scipio Africanus.
GB88091. Bronze AE 23, Villaronga-Benages 609 (R2), Villaronga MCH 282, Villaronga CNH 69, Burgos 552, SNG BM Spain 127 - 128, F, green patina, earthen encrustation, weight 10.487 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, c. 237 - 206 B.C.; obverse bare male head (Scipio Africanus?) left; reverse horse standing right, palm tree in background center on far side of horse; $115.00 SALE |PRICE| $104.00
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, Mid 2nd Century B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB89045. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2126, Villaronga 23, SNG BM Spain 1298, Burgos 695, SNG Cop -, aVF, earthen encrustation, scratches, spots of light corrosion, reverse a little off center, weight 18.451 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 90o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, mid 2nd century B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse helmeted sphinx walking right, left foreleg raised, star before, KASTILO in Iberic script below exergue line; ex Rusty Romans; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00
 


Carthago Nova, Iberia, c. 237 - 206 B.C.

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In order to force Hannibal to retreat from Italy, Scipio Africanus attacked Carthaginian Spain and took Carthago Nova in 209 B.C. References most often identify this type as Punic, struck before 209 B.C., but they also note that the head is "Roman style." Some authorities believe, as we do, that this type may have been struck after 209, under Roman rule. Carthaginian coins sometimes depicted Barcid generals. This coin possibly depicts the Roman general Scipio Africanus.
GB84581. Bronze 1/5 unit, Villaronga-Benages 610, SNG BM Spain 129, Burgos 556, Villaronga MHC 283, Villaronga CNH 70, VF, nice green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, tight flan, reverse off center, weight 2.306 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 0o, Carthago Nova mint, c. 237 - 206 B.C.; obverse bare male head (Scipio Africanus?) left; reverse horse head right; rare; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Celt-Iberian, Bolskan, Iberia, c. 150 - 90 B.C.

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Bolskan (modern Huesca, Spain) was the capital of the Iberian Vescetani tribe, located in Hispania Tarraconensis, about 65 km north of the Ebro River, on the road from Tarraco (modern Tarragona) and Ilerda (modern Lleida) to Caesaraugusta (modern Zaragoza). For six years Bolskan was the capital of Quintus Sertorius, the renegade Roman general and Iberian hero who took control of Spain, defeating all the Roman armies sent to remove him, until he was assassinated in 72 B.C. In 37 B.C., the city was refounded as a Roman colony, Urbs Victrix Osca.
CE88967. Bronze AE 24, Villaronga-Benages 1415 (R3), Alvarez-Burgos 1918, SNG BM 734, SNG Lorichs 814, aVF, dark green patina with highlighting earthen deposits, reverse a little off center, weight 10.840 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, die axis 105o, Bolskan (Huesca, Spain) mint, c. 150 - 90 B.C.; obverse bearded male head right, curly hair, dolphin head down behind; reverse horseman galloping right, couched spear in right hand, reins in left hand, star if five rays around central pellet above, Iberian legend "BoLSCaN" above ground line below; ex Jencek Historical Enterprise; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Julia Traducta, Hispania Baetica; Hammered Edge - Protocontorniate

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A protocontorniate is a normal, large bronze coin, typically a sestertius, which was altered in antiquity by an individual hammering the edge to create raised rims. A common assumption is that protocontorniates were used as game counters. Andreas Alföldi argued that protocontorniates were New Year's gifts in the fourth century before proper contorniates were struck at the Rome mint. Augustus was among the favorite emperors for these.

Julia Traducta struck coins only during the reign of Augustus. It is not possible to precisely date this type but it may have been struck when Augustus visited the region in 15 - 14 B.C.
RP91039. Bronze Protocontorniate, cf. Villaronga-Benages 3357, RPC I 108, SNG Cop 459, Burgos 1760, F, edge hammered up in antiquity, weight 9.513 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 90o, Julia Traducta mint, 15 - 14 B.C.(?); obverse PERM CAES AVG, bare head left; reverse IVLIA TRAD, inscription in two lines within oak wreath; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00
 


Castulo, Hispania Ulterior, c. 165 - 80 B.C.

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After a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal, Castulo allied with Carthage. In 213 B.C., Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents and the city became a foederati (ally) of Rome.
GB88984. Bronze as, Villaronga-Benages 2133; Villaronga p. 334, 30; SNG BM Spain 1311; Burgos 699; SNG Cop -, VF, attractive style, green patina, strike a little weak, ragged irregularly shaped flan, a few flan flaws (pits), weight 13.380 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Castulo (near Linares, Spain) mint, c. 165 - 80 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, dolphin before swimming upward; reverse helmeted sphinx walking right, left foreleg raised, star before, KASTILO in Iberic script below exergue line; ex Sayles & Lavender; $70.00 SALE |PRICE| $63.00
 


Iberia, Bronze Bar Ingot, 1st Century B.C.

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CE88132. Bronze Bar Ingot, Alvarez-Burgos P35, 28.634g, 41.2mm, VF, $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $54.00
 




  



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REFERENCES|

Alvarez-Burgos, F. La Moneda Hispanica desde sus origines hasta el Siglo V. (Madrid, 2008).
American Numismatic Society Collections Database (ANSCD) - http://numismatics.org/search/search.
Burgos, A. La moneda hispanica desde sus origenes hasta el siglo V. (Madrid, 2008).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Delgado, A. Catalogeu des monnaies et des medailles antiques du moyen age et des temps modernes, composant le cabinet numismatique de feu Mr. Gustave Daniel de Lorichs. (Madrid, 1857). Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints from the Lindgren Collection. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Roman Provincial Coins (RPC) Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/.
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and The Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 8: Egypt, North Africa, Spain - Gaul. (1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 1: Hispania. Gallia Narbonensis. (Berlin, 1968).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 1: Hispania-Sikelia. (Berlin, 1981).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain, Volume IX, British Museum, Part 2: Spain. (London, 2002).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Hispania I, Madrid. Museo Arqueológico Nacional. Ciudades Feno-púnicas.. (1994 - 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Sweden, Vol. II: Stockholm, Part 6, National Museum of Monetary History, The G.D. Lorichs Collection. (Stockholm, 2003).
Villaronga, L. Corpus Nvmmvm Hispaniae Anti Avgvsti Aetatem. (Madrid, 1994).
Villaronga, L. La Monedas Hispano-Cartaginesas. (Barcelona, 1973).
Villaronga, L. & J. Benages. Ancient Coinage of the Iberian Peninsula: Greek / Punic / Iberian / Roman. (Barcelona, 2011).
Vives, A. La moneda Hispanica. (Madrid, 1926).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 24, 2019.
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Roman Hispania