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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Olympians ▸ Ares or MarsView Options:  |  |  |   

Ares or Mars

God of war and bloodshed. Symbols include the boar and the spear. Son of Zeus and Hera.


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.

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The "Lost Arch of Nero" was decreed by the Senate in 58 A.D. to commemorate the eastern victory of Cn. Domitius Corduba. It was located on Capitoline Hill. It was demolished shortly after Nero's downfall. No trace remains today.
SL85477. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 147, BMCRE I 187, BnF II 287, Cohen I 308, SRCV I 1962, NGC Ch VF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5, fine style, light smoothing (3762373-001), weight 27.57 g, maximum diameter c. 34 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate bust right, aegis on neck; reverse triumphal arch; surmounted by statue of Nero in a facing quadriga, led by Pax on left and Victory on right, and flanked below by two soldiers; front ornamented with statue of Mars in a niche and bas-reliefs of small figures; garland hanging in arch, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking; ex Stacks NYINC Auction (8 Jan 2016), lot 31152; ex Rockaway Collection; $1620.00 (1441.80)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The obverse and reverse legends and types are known from the London mint with III in the exergue (RIC V 88 (R2), Web Carausius 114). This variety, perhaps unofficial, is unpublished in the many references examined by Forum. We also could not find an example online. This is the only example known to Forum.
RA73474. Billon antoninianus, Apparently unpublished; RIC V -; Webb Carausius -; Casey -; SRCV IV -; Hunter IV -; Linchmere Hoard -; Bicester Hoard -; et al. -, VF, nice green patina, attractive style, parts of legends weak, reverse slightly off center, some marks, small encrustations, weight 2.547 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) or unofficial mint, c. 290 - summer 293 A.D.; obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse [MARS] VICTO[R?], Mars walking right, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms across left shoulder in left hand, [M?]CXX in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; possibly unique!; $300.00 (267.00)


Persian Empire, Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia & Cappadocia, c. 384 - 362 B.C., Tarsus, Cilicia

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Datames' enemies in Artaxerxes' court accused him, perhaps falsely, of intending to revolt against the Great King. Secretly warned, he then did, in fact, revolt, c. 370 B.C. The revolt appeared to be leading to a breakup of the entire western half of the empire into autonomous states. His own son's desertion to Artaxerxes was, however, the beginning of the end, which came when Datames was assassinated, c. 362 B.C.
GS84906. Silver obol, Gokturk 25; SNG BnF 278; SNG Levante 81; Casabonne series 1, pl. 3, 22, aEF, toned, tiny edge splits, weight 0.611 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 45o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 378 - 372 B.C.; obverse female head right (Aphrodite?), wearing earring, necklace, and diadem; reverse Aramaic legend right, helmeted male head (Ares?) right; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 28 (2 Jul 2016), lot 231; $210.00 (186.90)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The as is a rare denomination for Septimius Severus.
SH66874. Copper as, RIC IV 683, BMCRE V 527A, Cohen IV 313 (4 Fr), VF, weight 11.298 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 194 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP IIII, laureate head right; reverse MARS PATER, Mars walking right, nude but for helmet and cloak over shoulder flying behind, transverse spear in right hand, trophy of captured arms in left over shoulder; very rare; $200.00 (178.00)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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On 8 October 314, at the Battle of Cibalae, Constantine defeated Licinius near Colonia Aurelia Cibalae (modern Vinkovci, Croatia). Licinius was forced to flee to Sirmium and lost all of the Balkans except for Thrace. The two Augusti initiated peace negotiations, but they failed and they would not make peace until 1 March 317.
RL76327. Billon follis, Unlisted bust variety of a very rare type; RIC VII Ticinum 4 (R4) var. (head), SRCV IV 15258 var. (same), Cohen VII 139, Hunter V -, VF, well centered, light contact marks and corrosion, weight 3.147 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from front; reverse MARTI CONSERVATORI, Mars standing right, helmeted, in military dress, reversed spear in right hand, left hand resting on grounded shield, PT in exergue; $155.00 (137.95)


Tacitus, 25 September 275 - June 276 A.D.

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Mars holds both the implements of war and the olive branch of peace. "Peace through strength" is an ancient phrase and concept implying that strength of arms is a necessary component of peace. The phrase has famously been used by many leaders from Roman Emperor Hadrian in the first century A.D., to Ronald Reagan in the 1980s.
RA84987. Billon antoninianus, MER-RIC 3408 (96 spec.), RIC V 145, BnF XII 1681, La Venra 1565 - 1604, Gloucester 727, Maravielle 785, Hamburger Kunsthalle 1573, Choice VF, silvering, well centered, some light corrosion, weight 4.335 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, issue 2, early ? June 276; obverse IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse MARTI PACIF (to Mars the peacemaker), Mars advancing left, wearing crested helmet and military dress, olive branch raised in right hand, transverse spear and oval shield in left hand, S in exergue; $140.00 (124.60)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 63 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77170. Bronze AE 20, SNG Cop 153; SNG BM 1162 corr. (monograms); Stancomb 680 var. (same); BMC Pontus p. 17, 48 ff. var. (same); SNG SNGvA 64 var. (same); HGC 7 241, VF, tight flan, flan adjustment marks, weight 7.960 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 63 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap to right, AMI−ΣOY divided across field, star within crescent with horns up upper left, monograms upper right, lower left and lower right; $135.00 (120.15)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 120 - 63 B.C.

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Amisos was settled c. 760 - 750 B.C. by people from Miletus, who established a flourishing trade relationship with the ancient peoples of Anatolia. Amisos came under the rule of the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great's Macedonian Empire, and then the Kingdom of Pontus. The Romans took control in 47 B.C. and Amisos remained within the Byzantine Empire after the fall of Rome. In 1200, the city was captured by the Seljuks, to be later taken over by the Ilhanlilar. Amisos today is Samsun, a city of about half a million people on the north coast of Turkey.
GB77171. Bronze AE 19, SNG BM 1161; SNGvA 64; BMC Pontus p. 17, 48; SNG Stancomb 679 var. (monograms); SNG Cop 154 ff. var. (same); SGCV II 3643; HGC 7 241, VF, tight flan, coarse green patina, weight 8.417 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 120 - 63 B.C.; obverse head of Ares right in crested helmet; reverse sword in sheath with strap, AMI−ΣOY divided across field, star within crescent with horns up upper left, IB upper right, monograms lower left and right; $135.00 (120.15)


Roman Republic, L. Julius L.F. Caesar, 103 B.C.

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The "heads" side of coin (and most but not all examples of this type) was struck with a hand-held (reverse) die and the "tails" side was struck with an anvil (obverse) die. It could be described with the heads side as the reverse. Venus refers to the mythical descent of the Julius Gens from Iulus, the grandson of Venus and Anchises, and the founder of Alba Longa. Crawford notes the control mark letter on the obverse and reverse of this type invariably match.
RR85232. Silver denarius, SRCV I 198, Sydenham 593, Crawford 320/1, RSC I Julia 4, RBW Collection 1175, aVF, banker's mark on obverse, flan flaw on reverse, bumps, scratches, weight 3.811 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 103 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Mars left, R (control mark) above, CAESAR upwards behind; reverse Venus in a biga pulled by cupids, holding scepter in right hand, reins in left hand, R (control mark) above, lyre below left, LIVLILF in exergue; $130.00 (115.70)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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Mars holds both the implements of war and the olive branch of peace. "Peace through strength" is an ancient phrase and concept implying that strength of arms is a necessary component of peace. The phrase has famously been used by many leaders from Roman Emperor Hadrian in the first century A.D., to Ronald Reagan in the 1980s.
RB78076. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 152, Cohen V 146, Banti 37, SRCV III, VF, centered on a flan crowding off the top half of the obverse legend and most of the reverse legend, reverse double struck, light marks and corrosion, weight 10.207 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, 8th emission, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P V COS III P P, Mars standing left in military garb, raising olive branch in right hand, right hand on grounded shield, inverted spear leaning on left shoulder, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; $125.00 (111.25)




  



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Ares or Mars