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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Personifications ▸ DemocracyView Options:  |  |  | 

Democracy (Demos - The People)

Demos is the personification of the people. Here we will also include coins that depict personifications of the Senate, citizens councilman (boule), and elders (gerousia).


Roman Republic, M. Junius Brutus (Q. Caepio Brutus), 54 B.C.

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M. Junius Brutus (also called Q. Caepio Brutus) is the most famous of Caesars assassins. Many of Brutus' coins honor his ancestors and illustrate his strong republican views. The obverse honors L. Junius Brutus, the consul who in 509 B.C. forced the expulsion of the Tarquin Kings from Rome and founded the Republic. The reverse honors Gaius Servilius Ahala, who threw Spurius Maelius down from the Tarpeian rock to his death for plotting against the Republic and aspiring to tyranny. Caesar should not have been surprised by Brutus!
RR86434. Silver denarius, RSC I Junia 30, Sydenham 907, Crawford 433/2, BMCRR I Rome 3864, Russo RBW 1543, SRCV I 398, VF, iridescent toning, obverse a little off center, scratches, weight 3.542 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 54 B.C.; obverse bearded bare head of L. Junius Brutus (consul 509 B.C.), BRVTVS behind; reverse bearded bare head of C. Servilius Ahala (master of the horse 439 B.C.), AHALA behind; $500.00 (425.00)


Roman Republic, M. Junius Brutus (Q. Caepio Brutus), 54 B.C.

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M. Junius Brutus (also called Q. Caepio Brutus) is the most famous of Caesars assassins. Many of Brutus' coins honor his ancestors and illustrate his strong republican views. Lucius Junius Brutus overthrew the last king of Rome and established the Republic in 509 B.C. Caesar should have taken notice of the message of patriotic devotion Brutus conveyed by his coins.
RR86469. Silver denarius, Crawford 433/1, Sydenham 906, RSC I Junia 31, BMCRR 3861, Russo RBW 1542, SRCV I 397, VF, toned, uneven strike with weak areas, bankers mark, slightly off center, weight 4.001 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 54 B.C.; obverse LIBERTAS downward behind, head of Liberty right, hair rolled, wearing drop pendant earring and necklace; reverse L. Junius Brutus between two lictors, preceded by an accensus, all walking left, BRVTVS in exergue; $300.00 (255.00)


Sala, Lydia, c. 2nd Century A.D.

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Hermes was the messenger of the gods and the god of commerce and thieves. He was the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia. His symbols include the caduceus and winged sandals.
RP77505. Bronze AE 17, SNG Munchen 455; BMC Lydia p. 229, 15; SNG Cop 416, VF, well centered, nice green patina, areas of corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Sala mint, c. 2nd century A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC CAΛHNΩN, laureate and draped bearded bust of Demos; reverse EΠI AN∆PONEICOY, Hermes standing slightly left, nude, chlamys draped over left arm, purse in right hand, caduceus in left hand; ex Divus Numismatik; rare; $95.00 (80.75)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, c. 218 - 268 A.D.

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An Apollo Citharoedus is a statue or image of Apollo with a Kithara (lyre). Among the best-known examples is the Apollo Citharoedus of the Vatican Museums, a 2nd-century A.D. colossal marble statue by an unknown Roman sculptor. Apollo is shown crowned with laurel and wearing the long, flowing robe of the Ionic bard. The statue was found in 1774, with seven statues of the Muses, in the ruins of Gaius Cassius Longinus' villa near Tivoli, Italy. The sculptures are preserved in the Hall of the Muses, in the Museo Pio-Clementino of the Vatican Museums. Apollo
RP77263. Bronze AE 25, Johnson Hierapolis 67 (3 spec.); Weber CHP II, 12; BMC Phrygia p. 242, 85; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; SNG Mun -; countermark: Howgego 278, F, c/m: F; well centered on a broad flan, edge crack, weight 7.557 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 218 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA CY- NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; countermark: Male figure standing, uncertain object in right hand, scepter or spear in left hand, letter(s) in field; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOPΩN, Apollo Kitharoedos (Archegetes) standing right, in long chiton and mantle, plectrum in lowered right hand, Kithara in left arm; very rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Pergamon, Mysia, Plautius Silvanus, Roman Proconsul of Asia under Augustus, 4 - 5 A.D.

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M. Plautius Silvanus was Proconsul of Asia from 4 to 5 A.D. He was consul in the 2 A.D. and belonged to the inner circle of Augustus. Whether the legend on the obverse refers to Augustus, remains a question, likewise the exact interpretation of the scene. Eastern denominations are not fully understood, but this brass coin may have been equal to the Roman as or 1/3 of a dupondius.

The adjustment marks visible in the fields probably indicate that this flan was cut from a round bar, not cast. These marks are found on some other examples of the type.
RP83567. Brass AE 22, RPC I 2364; BMC Mysia p. 139, 242 - 245; SNG Cop 461, gVF, well centered, strong flan adjustment marks, weight 4.013 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, 4 - 5 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTON ∆HMOΦΩN, Augustus in tetrastyle temple; reverse ΣIΛBANON ΠEPΓAMHNOI, Demos of Pergamum crowning the proconsul M. Plautius Silvanus, who is wearing toga; $90.00 (76.50)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, c. 218 - 268 A.D.

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Telesphorus was a son of Asclepius. He frequently accompanied his sister, Hygieia. He was a dwarf whose head was always covered with a cowl hood or cap. He symbolized recovery from illness, as his name means "the accomplisher" or "bringer of completion" in Greek. Representations of him are found mainly in Anatolia and along the Danube. Telesphorus is assumed to have been a Celtic god in origin, who was taken to Anatolia by the Galatians in the 3rd century B.C., where he would have become associated with the Greek god of medicine, Asclepius, perhaps in Pergamon (an Asclepian cult center) and spread again to the West due to the rise of the Roman Empire, in particular during the 2nd century A.D., from the reign of Hadrian.
RP77250. Bronze AE 23, Johnson Hierapolis 70 (3 spec.); BMC Phrygia p. 242, 86; SNG Cop 445; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; SNG Mun -; SNG Hunt -; et al. -; c/m Howegego 278, aF, attractive for grade, weight 6.085 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 218 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA CY-NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; countermark: male figure standing, an uncertain object in right hand, scepter or spear in left hand, letter(s) in field, irregularly shaped punch; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOP,ΩN (last two letters in left field), Hygieia seated left, kalathos on head, from phiale in her right hand, feeding snake rising before her, resting left elbow on cushion(?), small Telesphoros behind; very rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, c. 221 - 268 A.D.

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The AKTIA festival and games at Hierapolis were founded in honor of Augustus' victory at Actium.
RP77252. Bronze AE 26, Johnston Hierapolis 74; BMC Phrygia p. 242, 89; SNG Cop 444; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; SNG Hunt -; Waddington 6128; Weber -; McClean -; c/m: Howgego 278, aF, broad flan, small edge crack; countermark: gF, weight 5.595 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 221 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA CY-NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; countermark: male figure standing, an uncertain object in right hand, scepter or spear in left hand, letter(s) in field, irregularly shaped punch; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOPΩN, A/KTI/A in three lines within a demos crown (laurel wreath); very rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, c. 218 - 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Telesphorus was a son of Asclepius. He frequently accompanied his sister, Hygieia. He was a dwarf whose head was always covered with a cowl hood or cap. He symbolized recovery from illness, as his name means "the accomplisher" or "bringer of completion" in Greek. Representations of him are found mainly in Anatolia and along the Danube. Telesphorus is assumed to have been a Celtic god in origin, who was taken to Anatolia by the Galatians in the 3rd century B.C., where he would have become associated with the Greek god of medicine, Asclepius, perhaps in Pergamon (an Asclepian cult center) and spread again to the West due to the rise of the Roman Empire, in particular during the 2nd century A.D., from the reign of Hadrian.
RP77260. Bronze AE 25, Johnson Hierapolis 70 (3 spec.); BMC Phrygia p. 242, 86; SNG Cop 445; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; SNG Mun -; SNG Hunt -; et al. -; c/m Howegego 278, aF, area of reverse flattened by countermarking, weight 6.382 g, maximum diameter 24.7 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 218 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA - CVNKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; countermark: Male figure standing, uncertain object in right hand, scepter or spear in left hand, letter(s) in field, irregularly shaped punch; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOP,ΩN (last two letters in left field), Hygieia seated left, kalathos on head, from phiale in her right hand, feeding snake rising before her, resting left elbow on cushion(?), small Telesphoros behind; very rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Hierapolis, Phrygia, c. 221 - 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The AKTIA festival and games at Hierapolis were founded in honor of Augustus' victory at Actium.
RP77253. Bronze AE 24, Johnston Hierapolis 74; BMC Phrygia p. 242, 89; SNG Cop 444; SNGvA -; SNG Tub -; SNG Hunt -; Waddington 6128; Weber -; McClean -; c/m: Howgego 278, F, well centered, edge crack, punch or flan flaw on the reverse; countermark: F, weight 5.388 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, pseudo-autonomous, c. 221 - 268 A.D.; obverse IEPA CY-NKΛHTO-C, draped bust of the senate right; countermark: male figure standing, an uncertain object in right hand, scepter or spear in left hand, letter(s) in field, irregularly shaped punch; reverse IEPAΠOΛEITΩN NEΩKOPΩN, A/KTI/A in three lines within a demos crown (laurel wreath); very rare; $75.00 (63.75)







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REFERENCES

Kurth, D. Demos, The Personification of the People. (2010).
Martin, K. Demos, Boule, Gerousia: Personifikationen stdtischer Institutionen auf kaiserzeitlichen Mnzen aus Kleinasien. (Bonn, 2013).


Catalog current as of Monday, December 11, 2017.
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Democracy