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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Geography ▸ EgyptView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of Ancient Egypt

Please see the Egyptian, Beaded Horus Falcon and Kebhsenuf Funerary Ornaments, Ptolemaic Period, 304 - 30 B.C.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

These beaded Horus Falcon and Qebehsenuef funerary ornaments were likely placed on the chest of a mummy sheathed in strands of blue faience beads.
AZ33396. Colorful beaded funerary ornament; Alex G. Malloy, Ancient Art and Antiquities, Summer 1977, 17, intact with original strings, Superb, 7 " Horus Falcon with crowned head and spread wings, with pairs of 3 " Qebehsenuef, brightly colored turquoise blue, maroon, white yellow, and black beads faience beads; $1800.00 (1530.00)


Roman Republic, Marcus Junius Brutus, Most Famous of Caesars Assassins, 44 - 42 B.C.

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This type, traditionally attributed to an otherwise unknown Dacian or Sythian king Koson, was struck by Brutus, c. 44 - 42 B.C., with gold supplied by the Senate to fund his legions in the Roman civil war against Mark Antony and Octavian. The obverse imitates a Roman denarius struck by Brutus in 54 B.C. depicting his ancestor L. Junius Brutus, the traditional founder of the Roman Republic. The reverse imitates a Roman denarius struck by Pomponius Rufus in 73 B.C. The meaning of the inscription "KOΣΩN" is uncertain. KOΣΩN may have been the name of a Dacian king who supplied mercenary forces to Brutus, or BR KOΣΩN may have been intended to mean "[of] the Consul Brutus."
SH85674. Gold stater, BMCRR II p. 474, 48; RPC I 1701A (Thracian Kings); BMC Thrace p. 208, 1 (same); SNG Cop 123 (Scythian Dynasts), Choice gVF, full circles strike, mint luster, weight 8.378 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 0o, military mint, 44 - 42 B.C.; obverse Roman consul L. Junius Brutus (traditional founder of the Republic) in center, accompanied by two lictors, KOΣΩN in exergue, BR (Brutus) monogram left; reverse eagle standing left on scepter, wings open, raising wreath in right talon; $1700.00 SALE PRICE $1530.00


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Otho ruled for just a few months. The mint of Alexandria struck coins with his name, though the portrait bears little resemblance to those of the other mints. It is possible that Alexandria produced coins without having an image of the new emperor.
RP84745. Bronze hemidrachm, RPC I 5364 (3 spec.); Geissen 257; Dattari 336; BMC Alexandria 217; Milne 376; SNG BnF 710; Kampmann-Ganschow 18.13; Emmett 189 (R4); SNG Milan -, F, attractive brown tone, flan crack, light scratches, smoothing, weight 16.768 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, beveled edge; reverse bust of Nilus right, wearing papyrus diadem, cornucopia behind right shoulder, date LA (year 1) before; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; extremely rare; $1170.00 SALE PRICE $1053.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.

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Ptolemy IV's surname Philopator means father lover, ironic since according to some authorities he poisoned his father. Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria. He was a cruel and evil monarch.
GP86391. Bronze drachm, Svoronos 1126, Weiser 51 (Ptolemy II, 253 - 249 B.C.), SNG Cop 219, SNG Milan 212, Hosking 39, Noeske -, aEF, fantastic head of Zeus, nice brown and brass surfaces, reverse spiral struck, centration dimples, weight 70.595 g, maximum diameter 41.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 221 - 204 B.C.; obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΛI between legs; A massive Ptolemaic bronze!; $650.00 (552.50) ON RESERVE


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April 69 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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This variety with a simpulum on the reverse is much rarer than the same type without this control symbol. RPC reports only 5 specimens with the simpulum and 17 specimens without it. This variety is missing from the important collections in Cologne, Paris, and Milan, and we know of only one example offered at auction in the past two decades (CNG 76, 12 Sep 2007, lot 3152, VF, $430 plus fees).
RP84748. Billon tetradrachm, Milne 359; RPC I 5354 (5 spec.); Dattari 327; BMC Alexandria p. 25, 208; Curtis 238; Kampmann 18.6; Emmett 184; Geissen -; SNG BnF -; SNG Milan -, F, toned, light encrustations, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, weight 12.583 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 15 Jan 69 - 17 Apr 69 A.D.; obverse AYTOK MAPK OΘΩNOΣ KAIΣ ΣEB, laureate head right, LA (year 1) lower right; reverse EΛEY-ΘEPIA, Eleutheria (Liberty) standing left, wreath in extended right hand, scepter in left hand, leaning with left elbow on column, simpulum (ladle used for tasting and pouring sacrificial libations) left in lower left field; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; extremely rare; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Roman Egypt, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D.

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Both the obverse and reverse types on this tessera are published but the combination does not appear to be published. Nor did we find another example online. According to Milne, lead tesserae served as local small change in Egypt during the first to the third century A.D.

Euthenia is the Greek personification of abundance or plenty. To the Romans she was Abundantia. Her attributes are grain and the cornucopia. On Roman coins of Alexandria she often appears to be the spouse of the Nile; yet, in the Egyptian pantheon Euthenia did not exist and the Nile had no consort.
RX90574. Lead tessera, Unpublished; cf. Dattari 6444 and Geissen 3584 (for obverse type) and Dattari 6493 and 3575 (for reverse type), VF, weight 5.107 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 270o, Alexandria(?) mint, Nov 130 - c. 138 A.D. (possibly later); obverse Antinous on horseback right, wearing hem hem crown, caduceus in right hand; reverse Nilus reclining left on crocodile right below, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, reeds in his right hand, cornucopia in left; before him at his feet stands Euthenia (prosperity) wearing chiton and peplos, offering wreath held in right hand; extremely rare; $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Roman Provincial Egypt, Terracotta "Coin Mold," c. 316 - 320 A.D.

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Some call these counterfeiter's molds. However, Malloy notes on his tag for this specimen, "Originally thought to be molds for producing coins, now it is thought that these terracotta impressions themselves were used as a crude medium of exchange."
AS85456. Unofficial pseudo coin used for small change, VF, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, c. 316 - 320 A.D.; obverse retrograde impression of: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head of Galerius right (obverse of Galerius follis, c. 308 A.D.); reverse retrograde impression of: IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing facing, head left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle left at feet on left, K above eagle on left, wreath over X over A right in right field, ALE in exergue (reverse of Alexandria mint follis, 316 - 317 A.D., RIC VII Alexandria 17 - 19); $300.00 SALE PRICE $270.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C.

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Cleopatra VII originally shared power with her father Ptolemy XII and later with her brother-husbands Ptolemy XIII and Ptolemy XIV. Her relationship with Julius Caesar led to sole rule. After Caesar's assassination, she aligned with Mark Antony. Her reign marks the end of the Hellenistic Era and the beginning of the Roman Era. She was the last Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.
GI85343. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 1872; Weiser 184; SNG Cop 422; BMC Alexandria p. 123, 5; Noeske 383; Sear CRI 949, aF, bumps, scratches, corrosion, flan crack, weight 8.383 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Cleopatra right, characteristic melon coif; reverse KΛEOΠATPAΣ BACIΛICCHC, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head left, cornucopia left, M (40 drachms = hemiobol) right; $250.00 SALE PRICE $225.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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According to Ptolemaic bronze expert Daniel Wolf, "These coins are attributed by Svoronos to Ake-Ptolemas (Acre), but modern finds indicate they are most likely from the area near (modern) Bodrum in Turkey." Bodrum was called Halicarnassus, Caria in ancient times and was famous for housing the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
GP86392. Bronze obol, Svoronos 791 (4 spec., PII); Weiser 79; BMC Ptolemies p. 54, 75; SNG Cop 476 (PII); Malter 102 (PII); Noeske -; Hosking - (all refs. Ake Ptolemais), Choice gVF, well struck on a nice flan, nice dark patina, light earthen deposits, centration dimples, weight 13.294 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Caria (Halicarnassus?) mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Ptolemy), eagle standing half left on thunderbolt, head left, wings closed, tripod in left field; ex Pars Coins; scarce; $225.00 (191.25) ON RESERVE


Roman Egypt, Antinoopolites Nome(?), Portrait of Antinous, c. 130 - 153 A.D.

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Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and on 30 October 130 A.D., Hadrian founded the city of Antinoopolis on the very bank of the Nile river where Antinous drowned. It was the capital of a new nome, Antinoopolites. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
RX90575. Lead tessera, Dattari 6536, Geissen 3559 var. (11.23g), Emmett 4397 (R4), F, weight 4.666 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Antinoopolis (or Alexandria?) mint, c. 130 - 153 A.D.; obverse draped bust of Antinous right, wearing hem-hem crown of Harpocrates, crescent before; reverse Serapis standing left, wearing chiton, himation, and kalathos on head, right hand raised, long scepter vertical behind in left; rare; $200.00 SALE PRICE $180.00




  



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