Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Greek FractionsView Options:  |  |  |   

Greek Silver Fractions

Eryx, Sicily, c. 344 - 339 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Eryx was founded by Elymians on the summit of a mountain in northwest Sicily, about 10 km from Drepana (modern Trapani), and 3 km from the sea-coast, at the site of modern Erice. The Elymians maintained friendly relations and alliances with Carthage and came into frequent conflict with the Greeks. In 397 B.C., however, Eryx joined Dionysius I of Syracuse. It was speedily recovered by Himilco the following year. It again fell into the hands of Dionysius shortly before his death in 367 B.C., but was soon recovered by the Carthaginians, and probably was subject to their rule until the expedition of Pyrrhus in 278 B.C.
GS84640. Silver litra, Campana CNAI 47; Jenkins I pl. 24, 24; SNG ANS 1348; Jameson 1894; Winterthur 630; HGC 2 324 (????) corr. (male head/man-faced bull); SNG Cop -, VF, toned, tight flan, obverse slightly off center, weight 0.567 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 270o, Eryx (Erice, Sicily) mint, Punic rule, c. 344 - 339 B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, hair in a bun at the crown, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace; reverse bull standing left, Punic "RK" above; from the Nicholas Molinari Collection; very rare; $850.00 (756.50)


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 405 - 395 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS74435. Silver tetartemorion, BCD Boiotia 466; BMC Central p. 77, 87; SNG Cop 294; Brend Fractions 35; Head Boeotia 37, Choice VF, toned, weight 0.163 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, Thebes mint, 405 - 395 B.C.; obverse Boiotian ox-hide shield; reverse bunch of grapes on stem, Θ−E flanking above; ex BCD Collection; $320.00 (284.80)


Rhodes, Carian Islands, c. Mid 4th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This may be a fraction of the Pseudo-Rhodian "solar disk drachm" that Ashton suggests may be from Lampsakos under Memnon of Rhodes. Bronzes of a similar style are now known.
GS84169. Silver tetartemorion, Other than the two previous auction listings for this coin, apparently unpublished, VF, edge chip, weight 0.128 g, maximum diameter 6.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. mid 4th century B.C.; obverse facing radiate head of Helios, delicate linear ring around; reverse rose bloom; ex CNG e-auction 377 (29 Jun 2016), lot 130; ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 39 (3 Jan 2016), lot 386; unique(?); $320.00 (284.80)


Maroneia, Thrace, c. 398 - 385 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Maroneia was on the Aegean coast about midway between the mouths of the Hebrus and the Nestus rivers. The city was named after Maron, sometimes identified as a son of Dionysos, who in the Odyssey gives Odysseus the wine with which he intoxicates Polyphemos. Maroneia was famous for its wine, which was esteemed everywhere and was said to possess the odor of nectar.
GS85138. Silver triobol, Schnert-Geiss 198 (V13/R15); McClean 3964 (same dies); SNG Cop 613; BMC Thrace p. 127, 33, VF, attractive light iridescent toning, well centered on a tight flan, light scratches, weight 2.676 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 90o, Maroneia (Maroneia-Sapes, Greece) mint, c. 398 - 385 B.C.; obverse forepart of prancing horse left, dotted body truncation, H-P flanking at neck; reverse bunch of grapes on a vine, M - A flanking low across the field, all in a dotted linear square border within a square incuse; $280.00 (249.20)


Aspendos, Pamphylia, c. 490 - 450 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Aspendos is about 40 km east of Antalya, Turkey about 16 km inland on the Eurymedon River. In 546 B.C. it fell to Persia. After a Persian defeat in 467, the city joined the Attic-Delos Maritime League. Persia took it again in 411 B.C., Alexander in 333 B.C., and Rome in 190 B.C. Although often subject to powerful empires, the city usually retained substantial autonomy.
GA84056. Silver obol, Rosen 392, SNG BnF -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG PfPS -, SNG Kayhan -, BMC Lycia -, Klein -, VF, well centered, etched surfaces, obverse die crack, weight 0.626 g, maximum diameter 8.3 mm, Aspendos mint, c. 490 - 450 B.C.; obverse triskeles right, three pellets, one between each leg, reverse quadripartite incuse; extremely rare; $270.00 (240.30)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 440 - 375 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The name Larissa is in origin a Pelasgian (pre-Greek) word for "fortress." There were many ancient Greek cities with this name. The name of Thessalian Larissa is first recorded in connection with the aristocratic Aleuadai family. Larissa is thought to be where the famous Greek physician Hippocrates and the famous philosopher Gorgias of Leontini died.
GS77554. Silver trihemiobol, BCD Thessaly 1120, Trait 690 and pl. CCXCVII 23, SNG Cop -, BMC Thessaly -, aVF, weight 0.893 g, maximum diameter 12.3 mm, Larissa mint, c. 440 - 375 B.C.; obverse a bull's hoof with bone, laying on a small round dish or shield with a dotted edge, all within an outer dotted boarder; reverse diademed bust of Asklepios right, with long beard, drapery on his left shoulder, erect curving snake with head right before him, ΛAPI upward behind; very rare; $260.00 (231.40)


Phaselis, Lycia, 500 - 466 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Partial brockage obverse. The obverse was re-struck off-center over a brockage of the reverse, leaving two clear impressions.
GA83588. Silver tetrobol, SNGvA 4396, SNG Berry 1200 var. (ΦA above galley, Σ below), SNG Cop -, SNG Fitzwilliam -, VF, toned, tight flan, die wear, die cracks, partial brockage, weight 3.507 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 90o, Phaselis mint, 500 - 440 B.C.; obverse prow of war galley right in the form of a boar's forepart, partial brockage with incuse letters ΦA visible on obverse; reverse stern right, ΦAΣ above, all in incuse square; ex Roma Numismatics, e-sale 21 (31 Oct 2015), 368; $230.00 (204.70)


Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, c. Mid 5th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Monkeys were kept as pets in antiquity. We know of only two ancient coin types depicting monkeys. One is this very rare type, with the monkey squatting either left or right. The other is an electrum hemihekte from Kyzikos, Mysia with fewer than five known specimens.
CE84168. Silver tetartemorion, Tzamalis 67 var. (monkey left); cf, Svoronos HPM pl. 7, 13 (different reverse, damaged die?), aEF, very tiny coin, obverse a little off center, porous, weight 0.209 g, maximum diameter 6.3 mm, uncertain mint, c. mid 5th century B.C.; obverse monkey squatting right; reverse round shield within incuse square; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 39 (3 Jan 2016), lot 47; very rare; $225.00 (200.25)


Histiaia, North Euboea, Greece, c. 267 - 168 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Histiaia, named after its patron nymph, commanded a strategic position overlooking the narrows leading to the North Euboian Gulf. In the Iliad, Homer describes the surrounding plain as "rich in vines." It was pro-Macedonian during the 3rd century, for which it was attacked in 208 and captured in 199 by a Roman-Pergamene force. The Roman garrison was removed in 194. It appears Histiaia continued to prosper but little is known of its later history. Finds at the site indicate it continued to be inhabited in Roman, Byzantine, and later times.
GS85144. Silver tetrobol, BCD Euboia 412 - 413; HGC 4 1524; BMC Central p. 134, 123 var. (trident head below galley); SNG Cop 530 var. (same), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, attractive toning, reverse die wear, light marks, edge bump, weight 2.160 g, maximum diameter 14.5 mm, die axis 180o, Histiaia (near Oreoi, Greece) mint, c. 267 - 168 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Histiaia right, wearing earring and necklace, hair rolled and wreathed in vine; reverse IΣTI−AIEΩN (starting below, ending downward upper left), nymph Histiaia seated right on stern of a galley holding naval standard, ornate apluster, star ornament on hull; ex Art of Money (Portland, OR); $225.00 (200.25)


Apollonia Pontika, Thrace, 450 - 400 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Apollonia Pontica was founded as Antheia by Greek colonists from Miletus in the 7th century B.C. They soon changed its name to Apollonia after building a temple for Apollo. The temple contained a colossal statue of Apollo by Calamis, which was later taken to Rome and placed in the Capitol. The anchor on the coinage is evidence of the importance of its maritime trade.
GS84182. Silver drachm, Topalov Apollonia p. 586, 41; SNG BM 153; SNG Cop 454; SGCV I 1655, VF, excellent style, tight flan, edge crack, weight 3.136 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 270o, Apollonia Pontica (Sozopol, Bulgaria) mint, 450 - 400 B.C.; obverse Attic style gorgoneion (facing head of Medusa), wearing taenia, normal human hair, snakes around; reverse upside-down anchor, crayfish left, A right; ex FORVM (2009); $220.00 (195.80)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Monday, May 29, 2017.
Page created in 1.435 seconds
Greek Fractions