Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Hanukkah Sameach! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Happy Hanukkah! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Provenance ▸ Collections ▸ BCD CollectionView Options:  |  |  |   

BCD Collection

BCD is the initials of a collector who wishes to remain anonymous. One of the largest collections ever formed, including great rarities and coins of superb quality, portions of the BCD collection have been sold in multiple auctions held by several different numismatic firms. As a result of BCD's superb scholarly research, the auction catalogs for his collection have become primary references.


Mopsion, Thessaly, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Mopsion issued only bronze coins, and only c. 350 - 300 B.C. In Nomos 4, BCD notes, "The bronzes of Mopsion are practically impossible to find in nice condition and without flaws or corrosion. They are also very rare and desirable because of the their spectacularly eloquent reverse. The nicest one to come up for auction realized $18,000..."

Mopsion, in the Peneus valley half way between Larissa and Tempe, took its name from the Lapith Mopsos, a son of Ampyx. Mopsos learned augury from Apollo, understood the language of birds, and became an Argonaut seer. As depicted on this coin, he was one of the Lapiths who defeated the Centaurs. This battle was a favorite subject of Greek art. While fleeing across the Libyan desert from angry sisters of the slain Gorgon Medusa, Mopsos died from the bite of a viper that had grown from a drop of Medusa's blood. Medea was unable to save him, even by magical means. The Argonauts buried him with a monument by the sea, and a temple was later erected on the site.
GB87120. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 484, BCD Thessaly I 1210, Rogers 412, McClean 4648, HGC 4 537 (R2), SNG Cop -, Pozzi -, BMC Thessaly -, gF, dark garnet and black patina, well centered, a little rough, weight 8.082 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 225o, Mopsion (Bakraina(?), Greece) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus facing slightly right, vertical thunderbolt to right; reverse MOΨ-EI-ΩN, Lapith Mopsos standing facing, nude, his head turned right, raising club in right hand and extending his left hand, fighting centaur that is rearing left and raising a bolder over its head with both hands preparing to throw it; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "HK ex Thess., April 02, $275.-"; very rare; $500.00 (425.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 405 - 370 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
BCD Thessaly II notes this obverse die appears to have been altered (reworked).
GS73413. Silver drachm, Lorber-Shahar early group 3 (O25/R6), BCD Thessaly II 197 (same dies), Lorber Early 11.- (same obverse die), F, etched surfaces, die wear, weight 5.793 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 405 - 370 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly right, partially radiate hair with hornlike locks of hair on crown above ampyx, drop earring, plain necklace; reverse horse grazing right, legs straight, ΛAPI above; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "T/ne ex Thessaly, Sept. 2004, 55.-" ; $180.00 (153.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 342 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
GS73416. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly II 313; BMC Thessaly p. 31, 76; SNG Cop 122; HGC 4 453, F, some light scratches, weight 5.223 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 342 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and simple necklace; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg bent and raised, preparing to roll onto the ground, ΛAPI/ΣAIΩN in two lines starting in exergue, ending above; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "T/ne ex Thessaly, June 95, SFr. 50.-"; $180.00 (153.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 342 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
GS73419. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly II 324; BMC Thessaly p. 31, 76; SNG Cop 122; HGC 4 453, aVF, etched surfaces, weight 5.755 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 342 B.C.; obverse head of the nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, pendant earring, and simple necklace; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg bent and raised, preparing to roll onto the ground, ΛAPI/ΣAIΩN in two lines starting in exergue, ending above; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "S + Co. ex Thessaly, Nov. 1997, SFr. 40.-"; $180.00 (153.00)


Pharsalos, Thessaly, Greece, c. 420 - 400 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Pharsalos, built on a hillside of the Narthacius Mountains, was one of the main cities in Thessaly. In the Persian Wars, Pharsalos sided with the Athenians. In the early 4th century B.C., the city was a part of the Thessalian League. Later, it joined the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip II. The area became a theater of war where the Aetolians and the Thessalians clashed with the Macedonians, especially during the Second and the Third Macedonian Wars. After the defeat of the Macedonian Kingdom, Pharsalos and the whole area became a part of the Roman Republic. Pharsalos is famous for being the scene of the final battle between Caesar and Pompey.
GS87161. Silver hemidrachm, Lavva 63 (V34 / R33), SNG Ashmolean 3914 (same dies), BCD Thessaly II 664.2, HGC 4 632 (R3), aVF, well centered on a tight flan, edge cracks, light bumps and marks, some die wear, some porosity, weight 2.943 g, maximum diameter 15.1 mm, die axis 180o, Pharsalos (Farsala, Greece) mint, c. 420 - 400 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with raised cheek-piece, adorned with scroll; reverse Φ−A−P−Σ (clockwise from upper left, P and S reversed), horse's head and neck right, head turned slightly facing, concave field; ex BCD Collection with his round tag; $180.00 (153.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 369 - 360 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
GS73410. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly I 1146, HGC 4 439 (R1), BCD Thessaly II 281 - 282, F, etched obverse surface, punch on obverse left eye, weight 5.906 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 270o, Larissa mint, c. 369 - 360 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly right, hair floating freely, round curl on right, neck truncation elongated and very gently bow-shaped; reverse ΛAPI above, horse grazing right with straight legs; ex BCD Collection with his tag; $160.00 (136.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 356 - 342 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
GS73426. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly II 324; BMC Thessaly p. 31, 76; SNG Cop 122; HGC 4 453, gF, etched surfaces, porous, weight 5.781 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 315o, Larissa mint, c. 356 - 342 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing ampyx, earring, and wire necklace; reverse horse crouching right, left foreleg raised, preparing to lie down, ΛAPIΣ/AIΩN in two lines, first line in exergue, ending above; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "G/ni ex Thessaly, May 1997, SFr 60.-"; $160.00 (136.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 405 - 370 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This obverse is described in Lorber Early as wearing a taenia instead of an ampyx.

The obverse of most of the coins of Larissa depicted the nymph of the local spring, Larissa, for whom the town was named. The choice was probably inspired by the famous coins of Kimon depicting the Syracusan nymph Arethusa. The reverse usually depicted a horse in various poses. The horse was an appropriate symbol of Thessaly, a land of plains, which was well known for its horses. On other coins, there is a male figure, probably the eponymous hero of the Thessalians, Thessalos.
SH73427. Silver drachm, Lorber-Shahar early group 1 (O7/R2); Lorber Early 29.5 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 217 - 218; HGC 4 432, F, corrosion, weight 5.382 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Larissa mint, c. 405 - 370 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wearing taenia and necklace, hair floating freely; reverse horse grazing left, legs straight, short forelegs, shoulders lower than rump, grass under nose, ΛAPIΣAI above; ex BCD Collection; $160.00 (136.00)


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The constitution of Larissa was democratic, which explains why it sided with Athens in the Peloponnesian War. The area of Larissa celebrated a festival similar to the Roman Saturnalia, and at which slaves were waited on by their masters. It was taken by the Thebans and afterward by the Macedonian kings, and Demetrius Poliorcetes gained possession of it about 302 B.C.
GB87126. Bronze dichalkon, cf. BCD Thessaly II 393.4 (similar monogram); Rogers 279 ff.; SNG Cop 141; BMC Thessaly p. 32, 85; HGC 4 530 (various controls/ethnic arrangements), gVF, attractive well struck head of Larissa, dark patina, round flan, tight reverse crowding off legend (as typical for the type), weight 5.222 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Larissa mint, 3rd Century B.C.; obverse head of nymph Larissa facing slightly left, wreathed with grain, wearing necklace; reverse ΛA−P−IΣ,AIΩN (starting clockwise upper left, last five letters counterclockwise below), cavalryman on horse prancing right, wearing cuirass and Boiotian helmet, reigns in left hand, crouched lance in right hand, monogram (control) below horse; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "Thess. mid 90s, SFr. 90.-"; $150.00 (127.50)


Orthos (Orthe), Thessaly, Greece, Mid-4th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Most reference refer to this city as Orthe, probably in error. Little is known of Orthos except that it was located north of the modern Greek village of Kedros.
GB87129. Bronze dichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 497 (same rev. die); Trait IV 596 var. (same); HGC 4 699 (R1); Rogers 423 - 425 var. (different ethnic arrangements), aVF, well centered centered, dark patina, light marks and scratches, some light corrosion, die break reverse center, tiny edge split, weight 3.700 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 0o, Orthos (near Kedros, Greece) mint, mid-4th century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with raised earflap and ornamented with serpent and tendril; reverse upright trident, OPΘI arranged clockwise in two lines flanking trident, all within olive wreath; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "Ex Thessaly (via HK), April 2002, $125.-"; rare; $150.00 (127.50)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Sunday, December 9, 2018.
Page created in 0.843 seconds.
BCD Collection