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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ HeliosView Options:  |  |  | 

Helios

Helios was imagined as a handsome Sun god crowned with the shining aureole of the sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night. Helios is sometimes identified with Apollo. Greek poets never described Apollo driving the chariot of the sun, but it was common practice for Latin poets. Worship of Helios (and later Sol) was sometimes considered a cult in conflict with traditional worship.


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C.

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
SH76216. Silver tetradrachm, Unpublished; Houghton-Lorber I 165(1) var. (controls), cf. Houghton-Lorber I 169(a) (hemidrachm), VF, very high relief, well centered, bumps and marks, head of Zeus flatly struck, weight 17.143 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 90o, Susa (Shush, Iran) mint, c. 295 - 291 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY, Zeus enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg forward, feet on footstool, eagle in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, radiate bust of Helios facing (control symbol) on left, AP (primary control) under throne above strut, ΠA (secondary control) monogram under strut; extremely rare, possibly unique - the only example known to Forum; $900.00 (801.00)


Rhodes, Carian Islands, c. Mid 4th Century B.C.

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This may be a fraction of the Pseudo-Rhodian "solar disk drachm" that Ashton suggests may be from Lampsakos under Memnon of Rhodes. Bronzes of a similar style are now known.
GS84169. Silver tetartemorion, Other than the two previous auction listings for this coin, apparently unpublished, VF, edge chip, weight 0.128 g, maximum diameter 6.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, c. mid 4th century B.C.; obverse facing radiate head of Helios, delicate linear ring around; reverse rose bloom; ex CNG e-auction 377 (29 Jun 2016), lot 130; ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 39 (3 Jan 2016), lot 386; unique(?); $280.00 (249.20)


Hierapolis-Kastabala, Cilicia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Hierapolis-Kastabala was an ancient city in Cilicia Pedias, three kilometers north ancient Pyramus. Alexander the Great stopped at Kastabala before the Battle of Issus in 333 B.C. Antiochus IV refounded the city with the name Hierapolis. In the first century B.C., Hierapolis was the capital of a small local kingdom under the rule of the former Cilician pirate Tarcondimotus I, an ally of Mark Antony. Cicero referred to the city as Rome's most loyal ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people. The city was known for its temple of Artemis Perasia. Strabo wrote of her priestesses who, in a trance, would walk barefoot over hot coals without damage.
GY73092. Bronze AE 15, cf. CNG e-auction 250, lot 112; otherwise apparently unpublished; SNG BnF -, SNG Levante-, SNGvA-, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycaonia -, F, well centered, highlighting "desert" patina, some corrosion, weight 2.776 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 90o, Hieropolis-Kastabola, Cilicia mint, 2nd - 1st centuries B.C.; obverse radiate, draped bust of Helios right, dotted border; reverse eagle standing left on torch, wings open, head left, IEPOΠOΛITΩN above, ΠPOΣ TΩI ΠYPA[NA?] below; extremely rare; $160.00 (142.40)


Rhodos, Carian Islands, c. 188 - 170 B.C.

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Helios was the ancient Greek personification of the sun. Each day he drove the chariot of the sun across the sky. The Colossus of Rhodes, the sixth of the seven wonders of the ancient world, was a huge statue of Helios measuring 32 meters (100 feet) high, built at Rhodes in 280 B.C. The c. 3 gram drachm standard on which this coin is struck, used by Rhodes and other Carian cities, is called 'Plinthophoric' for the square incuse around the reverse type (plinthos = brick or ingot). The archaized incuse reverse revived a characteristic more typical of the 5th century B.C.
GS84891. Silver drachm, Jenkins Rhodian, group A, 2; HGC 6 1457 (C); SNG Keckman -; SNG Cop -; BMC Caria -, gVF, toned, darker areas, porous, light marks and scratches, weight 2.578 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodos (Rhodes, Greece) mint, magistrate Aetion, c. 188 - 170 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse rose with bud right, a bunch of grapes (control symbol) lower left, P - O across fields, ANTAIOΣ (magistrate) above, all within a shallow incuse square; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 27 (28 May 2016), lot 245; $160.00 (142.40)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece.
GB83488. Bronze AE 25, Mamroth Bronze 24a; SNG Alpha Bank 1110, SNG Munchen 1181; SNG Cop 1258 ff. var. (monograms), AMNG III/2 25 var. (same), aVF, nice sea-green patina, edge bump, edge split, marks, light corrosion, weight 13.892 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonian mint, 183 - 182 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse winged thunderbolt, ∆I monogram over BAΣIΛEΩΣ above , ΦIΛIΠΠOY below, all within oak wreath; $140.00 (124.60)


Malaka, Punic Iberia, 175 - 91 B.C.

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Phoenicians from Tyre founded Malaka (Mlaga, Spain today) about 770 B.C. The name was probably derived from the Phoenician word for "salt" because fish was salted near the harbor. After a period of Carthaginian rule, Malaka became part of the Roman Empire. The Roman city enjoyed remarkable development under a special law, the Lex Flavia Malacitana. A Roman theater was built at this time. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it was ruled first by the Visigoths and then the Byzantine Empire (550621). It was regained by the Visigoths in 621 and ruled by them until the Umayyad Muslim conquest in 711.
RP84866. Bronze AE 28, Villaronga-Benages 786, Burgos 1727, Villaronga CNH 9, SNG Lorichs 93, SNG BM Spain 357, aVF, double struck, encrustations, corrosion, ragged edge, weight 13.180 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Malaka (Mlaga, Spain) mint, 175/150 - 100/91 B.C.; obverse head of Vulcan right, bearded and wearing conical cap, tongs behind, neo-Punic inscription MLK outer left, all within laurel wreath; reverse radiate bust of Helios facing; ex Pegasi Numismatics ($175); $90.00 (80.10)


Side, Pamphylia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Side was founded by Greeks from Cyme, Aeolis, most likely in the 7th century B.C. The settlers started using the local language and over time forgot their native Greek. Excavations have revealed inscriptions written in this language, still undeciphered, dating from as late as the 2nd century B.C. The name Side is from this indigenous Anatolian language and means pomegranate.
GB90296. Bronze AE 18, BMC Lycia p. 151, 70 (with same Helios countermark); SNG Cop 411 (same); SNG BnF 750 ff.; SNG PfPs 501; Lindgren -, VF, unusually broad flan with full legends, nice green patina, reverse flattened by countermarking, weight 2.667 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Side mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, in crested Corinthian helmet; countermarks: facing head of Helios, helmeted head of Athena right, ΣI∆HTΩN horizontal above; reverse Nike advancing left, holding wreath; wearing long chiton, peplos around waist and left arm, pomegranate in left field, ΣI∆H−TΩN horizontal above divided by Nike's head; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; $80.00 (71.20)







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Catalog current as of Wednesday, September 20, 2017.
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Helios