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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Types ▸ Orbs or GlobesView Options:  |  |  |   

Orbs and Globes on Ancient Coins

Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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The Temple of Antoninus and Faustina is an ancient Roman temple in Rome, adapted as a Roman Catholic church, Chiesa di San Lorenzo in Miranda. It is in the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra, opposite the Regia. The temple was begun by Antoninus Pius in 141 and was initially dedicated to his deceased and deified wife, Faustina the Elder. When Antoninus Pius was deified after his death in 161 AD, the temple was re-dedicated jointly to Antoninus and Faustina at the instigation of his successor, Marcus Aurelius. The ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its pronaos are 17 metres high. The rich bas-reliefs of the frieze under the cornice, of garlanded griffons and candelabri, were often copied from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. San Lorenzo in Miranda
RB87194. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 746a, Cohen II 464, Hunter II 211, BMCRE IV 1641, SRCV II 4185, VF, well centered, excellent portrait, attractive reverse style, turning marks, light corrosion, porous, weight 25.180 g, maximum diameter 34.07 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 140 - 144 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right; reverse Italia seated left on celestial globe, wearing turreted crown, holding cornucopia before her in right hand, short scepter in left hand and cradled in left arm, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field, ITALIA in exergue; $600.00 (510.00)


Philip II, July or August 247 - Late 249 A.D.

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When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RS86827. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 218d, RSC IV 48, Hunter V 8, SRCV III 9240, EF, excellent portrait, detailed reverse, well centered and struck on a broad oval flan, light tone, flan crack, weight 3.598 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 244 - 246 A.D.; obverse M IVL PHILIPPVS CAES, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENT (to the Prince of Youth), Philip II standing slightly left, head left, wearing military dress, globe in extended right hand, inverted spear in left hand; ex Beast Coins; $125.00 (106.25)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
RL12133. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17157 var. (bust), Cohen VII 23, aEF, superb bust type, broad flan, slightly uneven strike, reverse legend weak, weight 3.018 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR crescent in exergue; rare; $115.00 (97.75)


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Parium, Mysia

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Founded in 709 B.C., the ancient city of Parion was a major coastal city, near Lampsacus, with two harbors used to connect Thrace with Anatolia. Parium belonged to the Delian League. In the Hellenistic period, it came under the domain of Lysimachus, and subsequently the Attalid dynasty. Julius Caesar refounded it as a colonia in the province of Asia. It was the main customs station through which all goods bound for Byzantium from Greece and the Aegean had to pass. When this coin was minted, Parium was within the Conventus of Adramyteum. After Asia was divided in the 4th century, Parium was in the province of Hellespontus. Today it is the village of Kemer in the township of Biga, Canakkale province, Turkey.
RP85229. Bronze AE 23, SNG anakkale 220 corr. (obv. legend), SNG BnF 1494 var. (same), SNG Cop 296 var. (same), BMC Mysia -, SNGvA -, SNG Tb -, SNG Hunt -, Lindgren -, VF, well centered and struck, bumps and scratches, centration dimples, weight 5.450 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 225o, Parium (Kemer, Canakkale, Turkey) mint, c. 178 - 180, probably 180; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS FEL A, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, beardless, from behind; reverse Capricorn swimming right, holding celestial globe between hooves, cornucopia on back, C G I H P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) below; very rare; $110.00 (93.50)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Balkerne Gate Colchester
RA73257. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 416, RIC V-2 358, Cohen VII 261, SRCV IV 13681 var. (S-C), Hunter IV 122 var. (same), VF, green patina, well centered, bumps, marks and scratches, weight 3.224 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, late reign tetrarchic portrait type; reverse PROVID AVG (the foresight of the Emperor), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, S - P flanking across field at center, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; $100.00 (85.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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In 323, Constantine the Great defeated invading Goths and Sarmatians north of the Danube in Dacia, and claimed the title Sarmaticus Maximus.
RL74542. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 372, SRCV IV 16731, Cohen VII 22; very rare shield decoration, aF, corrosion, patina flaking, weight 16.330 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear over shoulder in right, shield on left shoulder ornamented with Victory inscribing shield; reverse BEATA TRAN-QVILLITAS, altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, PTR in exergue; $95.00 (80.75)


Licinius I, 11 November 308 - 18 September 324 A.D.

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Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RT77507. Bronze follis, RIC VI Siscia 233a, SRCV IV 15249, Hunter V 64 var. (1st officina), Cohen VII -, EF, some silvering, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.556 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 A.D.; obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG NN (to Jove the protector of our two Emperors), Jupiter standing left, Victory on globe and offering wreath in Zeus' right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle left with wreath in beak at feet on left, ∆ right, SIS in exergue; $85.00 (72.25)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS87916. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 213, RSC IV 167, Hunter III 167, SRCV III 8626, Choice VF, well centered on a broad flan, light marks, some die wear, small edge cracks, weight 4.077 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 30o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 242 - 244 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ORIENS AVG (the rising sun of the Emperor), Sol standing slightly left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, globe in left; ex Beast Coins; $85.00 (72.25)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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The T in the mintmark serves both as the I in a mark of value (XXI = 20 parts bronze to 1 part silver, about 4.5% silver) and to indicate the mint (T = Ticinum).
RA76988. Billon antoninianus, Hunter IV 132; RIC V-2 387; Cohen VI 310; Pink VI-1 p. 63-64/4; cf. SRCV III 11988 (obv. leg, bust), gVF, some silvering, nice portrait, nice green patina, tight flan, weight 3.186 g, maximum diameter 20.8 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, emission 4, 278 A.D.; obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse IOVI CONSERVAT (to Jupiter the protector), Probus (on left) standing right, wearing military garb, eagle-tipped scepter in left hand, receiving with right hand globe form Jupiter, Jupiter (on right) standing left, nude but for cloak over shoulders, globe in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, VXXT in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL77203. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, charming portrait, some silvering, weight 3.162 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)




  



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 12, 2018.
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Orbs & Globes