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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Greek Imperial ▸ Asia Minor & CyprusView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins from Asia Minor and Cyprus

Vespasian the Younger, Caesar, 94 - 95 A.D., Smyrna, Ionia

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In 94 A.D., because he had no heir, Domitian adopted his two young great-nephews. He renamed them Vespasian and Domitian. The next year he executed the boys' father, his cousin, Titus Flavius Clemens, and exiled the boys' mother, his niece, Flavia Domitilla. They were charged with Atheism, a charge sometimes applied to condemn converts to Judaism or Christianity. The boys then disappeared from history and their fate is unknown.

Smyrna was the only city to strike coins in the name of Vespasian the Younger. No coins were struck for his brother.

Some scholars connect Domitilla with a Roman Matron in the Talmud (Avodah Zarah 10b) and the Deuteronomy Rabbah 2.25. When the emperor had decreed that in 30 days, the Senate would confirm an edict to kill all Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire, the Roman matron convinced her husband to stand up for the Jews. If that identification is correct, her husband Flavius Clemens converted to Judaism, after having contact with the great sage Rabbi Akiva. Flavia Domitilla is a saint in both the Greek Orthodox and the Roman Catholic Church.
SH83453. Bronze AE 16, Klose p. 244, 3, pl. 31 (V1/R1); RPC II 1028; SNG Cop 1360; SNGvA 2208; BMC Ionia p. 276, 320, gF/F, weight 2.790 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 0o, Smyrna (Izmir, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 94 - 95 A.D.; obverse OYOCΠACIANOC NEΩTEPOC, bare head right; reverse ZMYPNAIΩN, Nike standing right, wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand; ex Solidus Numismatik, auction 7, lot 200; rare; $950.00 (807.50)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Alexandreia Troas, Troas

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RPC II notes this extremely rare type was previously attributed to Apamea in Bithynia. The issue, however, included two reverse types, this Victory type and one with Apollo Smintheus, and the cult of Apollo Smintheus was centered on the Troad. Also, an example of the Apollo type was found at Alexandria. Both types are extremely rare. These were the first coins issued by Alexandria Troas, which otherwise did not strike coins before Antoninus Pius.
RP86548. Copper semis, RPC II 896/1 (2 spec., same obv. die); Milne NC 1953, p. 23, 6 (Apamea); Rec Gn p. 252, note 4 (same); Bellinger -; BMC Troas -; SNG Cop -, aF, tight flan, light corrosion, light deposits, reverse a little off center, weight 4.930 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 180o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory standing right, wearing long chiton, filleted wreath in extended right hand, palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, D - D flanking low across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins, ex Sayles & Lavender (2009); extremely rare; $380.00 (323.00)


Knidos, Karia, 2nd Century A.D.

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"In Roman times Cnidus seems from its scanty coinage to have lost its former importance. Only a few coins exist, Nero to Caracalla..." -- B. V. Head in Historia Numorum
RP86514. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV temp 975 (19 spec.); Nordb XXIX 1262; SNG Cop 331; BMC Caria p. 97, 97; Lindgren I 639; SNGvA -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of obverse legend, obverse legend weak, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 7.174 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Cnidus mint, legate Eupoleitas, 2nd century A.D.; obverse T K T EΠI EYΠOΛEITA, bearded male head right; reverse flaming column altar, KNI-∆IΩN divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare, none on Coin Archives, RPC lists only three examples sold at auction, the last sold in 2006; $360.00 (306.00)


Collossae, Phrygia, c 177 - 192 A.D.

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Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
RP86524. Bronze AE 32, RPC Online temp 1899; vA Phrygiens II 496 - 505; SNGvA 3765; SNG Mn 307; SNG Hunt 1938; McClean III 8789; BMC Phrygia p. 155, 5 (all same dies?), F, broad flan, earthen deposits, porous, weight 19.959 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Colossae mint, c. 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC - KOΛOCCHNΩ-N, laureate head of young Demos right; reverse Helios standing in galloping quadriga, facing, wearing radiate crown, globe in left hand, torch in right hand, KO-ΛOC/CH-NΩN in two divided lines below horses; ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $360.00 (306.00)


Olba, Cilicia, under Ajax, High Priest and Toparch, c. 10 - 16 A.D.

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Perhaps this dynasty of high priests claimed decent from the Ajax or Teucer, heroes of the Trojan war. Teucer was a prince of the Salamis, son of King Telamon and Queen Hesione, half-brother to Telamonian Ajax (Ajax the Greater). Ajax was the son of Telamon's first wife, Periboea. Ajax and Teucer worked in tandem during the Trojan War - Teucer unleashed his arrows from behind the mighty shield of Ajax. Arrow after arrow would find its mark amongst the Trojan ranks but every time that Teucer would fire at Hector, the mightiest of all the Trojan defenders, his arrow would be deflected. Unknown to Teucer, Apollo was at that time protecting Hector from death.
RP85939. Bronze AE 22, RPC I 3725; Staffieri 7; BMC Lyconia, p. 119, 2; SNG BnF 798; SNG Cop 186; SNG Levante 630; SNGvA 5783; Waddington 4418, EF/aVF, green patina, attractive obverse, reverse encrusted, bumps and marks, areas of porosity, weight 7.481 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Olba (Mersin Province, Turkey) mint, c. 10 - 11 A.D.; obverse AIANTOΣ TEYKPOY (Ajax, son of Teucer), draped bust of Ajax (as Hermes) right, wearing close fitting cap, earring, and chlamys on shoulders, kerykeion (caduceus) before; reverse triskeles in center between ET - A (year 1), APΞIEPEΩΣ / TOΠAPXOY / KEN-NAT / ΛAΛAΣΣ (high priest (archiereos) [of Olba] and governor (toparch) of Lalassis and Cennatis) in four lines, the first two lines above, the third under the date divided by the triskeles, and the last line below; $250.00 (212.50)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Antioch ad Maeandrum, Caria

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Antiochia on the Maeander (earlier named Pythopolis) was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia, located between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. It was the site of a bridge over the Maeander. The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yeniser) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydin Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Basaran. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes. It has not been excavated, although Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.
RP87111. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 2836, SNG BnF 144, SNG Fitzwilliam 4672, BMC Caria , SNGvA , SNG Cop , VF, tight flan, earthen deposits, green patina with some flaking, marks, light corrosion, weight 4.570 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Antiochia ad Maeandrum mint, obverse TIBEPIOΣ KΛAY∆IOΣ ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse MYΩNOΣ ΣYNAPXIA ANTIOXEΩN, Nike advancing right, holding palm frond vertical before her; very rare; $240.00 (204.00)


Amisos, Pontos, c. 85 - 65 B.C.

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Perseus, the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology. His exploits defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths in the cult of the Twelve Olympians. Perseus killed Medusa and claimed Andromeda, having rescued her from a sea monster.
GB82758. Bronze AE 29, SNG BM 1166 ff. var.; SNG Stancomb 683 ff. var.; BMC Pontus p. 16, 30 ff. var.; SNG Cop 137 var. (all with various monograms), VF, glossy dark green patina, slightly off center, some bumps and marks, light porosity, weight 17.769 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 0o, Amisos (Samsun, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 65 B.C.; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing triple crested helmet decorated with an apluster, griffin, and foreparts of four horses; reverse Perseus standing facing, harpa in right hand, wearing pointed helmet or cap with long ear flaps and himation over shoulders, Medusa's severed head in left hand, Medusa's decapitated body at his feet, AMI−ΣOY in one line divided across field, no monograms; $240.00 (204.00)


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia, Titus Reverse

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From the Lucas Harsh Collection.

Victoria or Nike, the Winged Goddess of Victory, personifies victory. She was described variously in different myths as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus. According to classical (later) myth, Styx brought them to Zeus when the god was assembling allies for the Titan War. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer, a role in which she often is portrayed in Classical Greek art. Nike flew around battlefields rewarding the victors with glory and fame, symbolized by a wreath of laurel leaves.
RY86441. Silver didrachm, RPC II 1648 (9 spec.); Sydenham Caesarea 90; Metcalf Cappadocia p. 92, 2; SNG Cop 185 var. (Nike flying, no line); SNG Fitz 5427 var. (same), VF, superb local style portrait, attractive toning, part of obverse legend weak, small encrustation, reverse a little off center, weight 6.384 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea (Kayseri, Turkey) mint, 76 - 77 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPA KAICAP OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, laureate bust of Vespasian right; reverse NIKH CEBACTH, Nike walking right on ground line (base?), wreath in extended right hand, palm over left shoulder in left hand; from the Lucas Harsh Collection; scarce; $230.00 (195.50)


Rhodos, Caria, c. 1 - 25 A.D.

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Although the radiate heads on coins of Rhodes are usually Helios, the wreath of ivy indicates this is Dionysos. Teimostratos was the first official named on the bronze coinage struck at Rhodes after Actium. His title, Treasurer (TAMIA), is unusual. The officials that followed at Rhodes were identified as Legate (EPI) in the inscriptions.
GB86523. Bronze drachm, RPC I 2748; SNG Keckman 759; SNG Cop 888; Ashton Early 107; Lindgren 700; BMC Caria p. 264, 377, F, broad flan, near black patina, earthen deposits, reverse double struck, porous, weight 25.209 g, maximum diameter 35.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rhodes mint, c. 1 - 25 A.D.; obverse radiate head of young Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath; reverse Rose seen in profile, small bud on tendril on each side of stem, poppy to left of stem, stalk of grain to right of stem, PO∆IΩN (Rhodos) above, TA-MIA / TEI-MO/CTP-ATOY (treasurer Teimostratos) in three lines divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $225.00 (191.25)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a citys status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77248. Bronze AE 28, Franke-Nolle, type VI, 857 (Vs.C/Rs.18); cf. SNGvA 3668; SNG Tbingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, VF, tight flan, obscure countermark on obverse, weight 9.924 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY K - ΠOY ΛIK OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, NEOKOPΩN downward in right field, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $215.00 (182.75)




  



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Roman Asia Minor & Cyprus