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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ Lydia ▸ HypaepaView Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Coins of Hypaepa, Lydia

Hypaepa, Lydia was on the route between Sardis and Ephesus, 42 miles from Ephesus, near the north bank of the Cayster River. The ruins are close to the present-day village of Gunluce, Turkey, 4 km NW of Odemis. According to myth, the women of Hypaepa received the gift of a form of dance from Aphrodite and Hypaepa was the home of Arachne before she became a spider. The Persian goddess Anahita, later called Artemis Anaitis, was worshiped as at Hypaepa. An inscription from the synagogue of Sardis indicates a Jewish community in Hypaepa. In 88 B.C., Hypaepa rebelled against Mithridates VI of Pontus and was severely punished. Under Tiberius it was a candidate to receive a temple dedicated to worship of the emperor, but was rejected as too insignificant. To judge by the number of Byzantine churches that it contained, Hypaepa flourished under the Byzantine Empire.


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Hypaepa, Lydia

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Hypaepa, Lydia was on the route between Sardis and Ephesus, 42 miles from Ephesus, near the north bank of the Cayster River. The ruins are close to the present-day village of Gunluce, Turkey, 4 km NW of Odemis. According to myth, the women of Hypaepa received the gift of a form of dance from Aphrodite and Hypaepa was the home of Arachne before she became a spider. The Persian goddess Anahita, later called Artemis Anaitis, was worshiped as at Hypaepa. An inscription from the synagogue of Sardis indicates a Jewish community in Hypaepa. In 88 B.C., Hypaepa rebelled against Mithridates VI of Pontus and was severely punished. Under Tiberius it was a candidate to receive a temple dedicated to worship of the emperor, but was rejected as too insignificant. To judge by the number of Byzantine churches that it contained, Hypaepa flourished under the Byzantine Empire.
RP11006. Bronze AE 30, Imhoof MG p. 386, 16; BMC Lydia -; SGICV -; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; Lindgren -, VF, weight 14.045 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 180o, Hypaepa (near Günlüce, Turkey) mint, 16 May 218 - 11 Mar 222 A.D.; obverse AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC CEB (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse EΠI AYP XAPIZENOY KAI ∆IONYCIOY CTΠA YΠAIΠH/NΩN, on left, cultus-statue of Artemis Anaitis facing; on right, emperor sacrificing left at altar, holding scepter; ex Colosseum Coin Exchange; of greatest rarity; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Hypaepa, Lydia

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Hypaepa was at the foot of Mt. Aipos, near the north bank of the Cayster River, 42 miles from Ephesus on the road to Sardis. The ruins are near the present-day village of Günlüce, 4 km northwest of Ödemıs. In myth, Aphrodite gave the gifts of beauty and a form of dance to the women of Hypaepa, and it was Arachne's home before she was turned into a spider. The Persian goddess Anahita, later identified with Artemis and called Artemis Anaitis, was worshiped there. In 88 B.C., Hypaepa rebelled against Mithridates VI of Pontus and was severely punished. Under Tiberius it was a candidate for locating a temple dedicated to worship of the emperor, but was rejected as too insignificant. To judge by the number of churches, Hypaepa flourished under the Byzantine Empire.
RP72125. Bronze AE 16, RPC I 2542 (11 spec.); SNG Cop 188; BMC Lydia p. 110, 16; SNGvA -, VF, a little off-center but on a broad flan, weight 2.131 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 45o, undefined mint, magistrate Mitrodoros Kon, 55 A.D.(?); obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP (counter-clockwise from upper left), bare head of Nero right; reverse YΠAIΠHNΩN MHTPO∆ΩPOΣ, KON (counter-clockwise from upper left, KON upward in right field), hero standing left, labrys (double axe) in right; ex Gitbud & Naumann 2010; last example listed on Coin Archives sold in 2013; rare; SOLD


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Hypaipa, Lydia

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Wandering the world in a panther-drawn chariot, Dionysos rode ahead of the maenads and satyrs, who sang loudly and danced, flushed with wine. They were profusely garlanded with ivy and held the thyrsus, a staff topped with a pinecone, a symbol of the immortality of his believers. Everywhere he went he taught men how to cultivate vines and the mysteries of his cult. Whoever stood in his way and refused to revere him was punished with madness.
RP76724. Leaded bronze AE 18, SNGvA 2961, RPC I 2550 (= vA coin, only one specimen cited), SNG Cop -, SNG Munchen -, BMC Lydia -, VF, tight flan, porous, weight 5.033 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Hypaepa (near Günlüce, Turkey) mint, Julios Hegesippos magistrate; obverse NEPΩN KAIΣAP, laureate head right; reverse Dionysos standing left, kantharos in right hand, thrysos vertical behind in left hand, IOVA / HΓHCIΠΠ in two upward lines on left, VΠAIΠH / ΓP in two upward lines on right; very rare; SOLD







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REFERENCES

Bank Leu/Münzen und Medaillen AG. Sammlung Walter Niggeler. (Zürich and Basel, 1965-1967).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 1. (London, 1926).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Lydia. (London, 1901).
Howgego, C. Greek Imperial Countermarks. (London, 1985).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Lydische Stadtmünzen, neue Untersuchungen. (Geneva and Leipzig, 1897).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Monnaies Grecques. (Paris, 1883).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Lindgren, H & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coinage of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Roman Provincial Coinage Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 5: Ionia, Caria, and Lydia. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, München Staatlische Münzsammlung, Part 23: Lydien. (Berlin, 1997).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 5: Karien und Lydien. (Berlin, 1994).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VI, Corpus Christi College Cambridge, The Lewis Collection II: The Greek Imperial Coins. (1992).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow, Part 2: Roman Provincial Coins: Cyprus - Egypt. (Oxford, 2008).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit. Vol. I. Pontus - Lydien. (Vienna, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II. Münzen der Antike. Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 7: Odemis Museum, Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins of Ionia, Lydia and etc. (Istanbul, 2012).

Catalog current as of Monday, November 20, 2017.
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Hypaepa