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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Baal||View Options:  |  |  | 

Baal

Ba'al simply means 'Lord' in Phoenician and was used to describe many local gods. At first the name Ba'al was used by the Jews for their God, but as the struggle between religions developed, the name Ba'al was given up in Judaism. Over time Ba'al became synonymous with Beelzebub.


Arados, Phoenicia, Unknown King "S", c. 348 - 339 B.C.

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Early coins of Arados have the Aramaic letters mem aleph (read from right to left) above the galley, abbreviating Melech Arad (meaning King of Arados), sometimes followed by the king's initial, and sometimes by the Phoenician regnal year date.
GS94263. Silver stater, cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 10, 59; Betlyon 26, pl. 7, 6; Rouvier III p. 132, 9; SNG Cop 23; HGC 10 34 (R1), VF, attractive toning, centered on a tight flan, highest points not fully struck, die wear, weight 9.767 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 270o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 348 - 339 B.C.; obverse laureate bearded head of Ba'al Arwad right; reverse galley right, figure of Pataikos right on prow, row of shields on bulwark, Phoenician letters mem aleph samen (Melech Arad S - King of Arados S) from right to left above, three waves below; ex Gorny & Mosch online auction 267 (17 Oct 2019), lot 3298; ex Shlomo Moussaieff Collection (London, 1948 - 1980s); $400.00 SALE |PRICE| $360.00


Achaemenid Empire, Mazaeus, Satrap of Cilicia , c. 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsus, Cilicia

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Artaxerxes III Ochus of Persia was the eleventh emperor of the Achaemenid Empire ruling from 358 to 338 B.C. and, after defeating Nectanebo II in 343 B.C., ruled as the first Pharaoh of the 31st dynasty of Egypt. His reign coincided with the reign of Philip II in Macedonia. Artaxerxes III was poisoned by the ambitious eunuch and chiliarch Bagoas. Bagoas also murdered most of Artaxerxes III's sons but put his youngest son, Arses, on the throne as a puppet emperor. This type was probably struck for Arses succession as Artaxerxes IV. Two years later Arses unsuccessfully attempted to poison Bagoas. Bagoas then poisoned Arses along with most of his family, and put Arses' cousin Darius III on the throne. To legitimize the conquests of Alexander the Great, Macedonian propaganda would accuse Darius III of playing a key role in the murder of Arses, who was thus identified as the last legitimate king of the Achaemenid royal house.
SH89697. Silver obol, Gktrk 35 (Myriandros), SNG BnF 429 (Myriandros), Newell Myriandros 16 4, Trait II 740, SNG Levante -, gVF, darker spots, some porosity, tight flan, weight 0.672 g, maximum diameter 10.4 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 338 - 336 B.C.; obverse Persian king (Artaxerxes III?) in the guise of Baaltars, seated right on throne with back terminating in a griffin's head, with long beard, wearing tall pointed Pharaonic crown, lotus flower in right hand, lotus-tipped sceptre in left hand; reverse youthful male head (Artaxerxes IV?) left, beardless, with curly hair, wearing earring and a tall pointed Pharaonic crown; ex Beast Coins; rare; $280.00 SALE |PRICE| $252.00


Laranda, Lycaonia, 4th Century B.C.

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Gktrk identifies this type as issued by Laranda, Lycaonia, which issued coins with the same types. Most references attribute the type to an uncertain city in Cilicia and some to Tarsos. Laranda was destroyed by Perdiccas in about 322 B.C. and later became a seat of Isaurian pirates. This type was minted with a progression of reverses, first with an incuse square, then a square border of dots, and finally with a circle of dots. The original archaic punch reverse gradually evolved into a regular die, nearly identical to an obverse die. This variant is from near the beginning of that evolution.
MA94355. Silver obol, Gktrk 57, SNG BnF 449 (uncertain Cilicia), SNG Levante 223 (uncertain Cilicia), aF, weight 0.497 g, maximum diameter 10.3 mm, die axis 270o, Laranda (Karaman, Turkey) or uncertain Cilician mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse Baal seated left on backless throne, grain ear and bunch of grapes in right, long scepter vertical behind in left; reverse forepart of wolf right, crescent horns downward above, within square dotted boarder in incuse square punch; $5.15 (4.53)







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 28, 2020.
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Baal