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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Anatolia ▸ CappadociaView Options:  |  |  | 

Cappadocia

Cappadocia is in eastern Anatolia, in the center of what is now Turkey. After ending Persian rule, Alexander the Great intended to rule Cappadocia through one of his military commanders, but Ariarathes, a Persian aristocrat, somehow made himself king of the Cappadocians. Ariarathes I was successful and extended the borders of the Cappadocian Kingdom as far as the Black Sea. After Alexander's death, Perdiccas designated Eumenes to rule the area. Ariarathes was defeated, captured and crucified, but due to Macedonian infighting Ariarathes' son recovered his inheritance. He left the kingdom to a line of successors, who mostly bore the name of the founder of the dynasty. Under Ariarathes IV, Cappadocia became an ally of Rome. The kingdom maintained independence until A.D. 17, when the Tiberius reduced Cappadocia to a Roman province.


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS76406. Silver hemidrachm, RPC II 1661; Metcalf Caesarea 19; Sydenham Caesarea 116; BMC Galatia p. 48, 21; SNG Righetti 1762; SNG Cop -, VF, nice portrait, reverse a little off-center, spotty toning, weight 1.678 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, obverse AYTOKPATWP TITOC KAICAP CEBA, laureate head right; reverse Nike standing right, raising wreath in right, palm frond over shoulder in left, no legend; from the Jeff Michniak Collection; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos, 42 - 36 B.C.

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Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos (Pious, brother-loving) was the king of Cappadocia from c. 42 - 36 B.C. He was of Persian and Greek ancestry. His father was King Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia and his mother was Queen Athenais. He became king after his brother Ariobarzanes III Philoromaios was killed. His rule did not last long as Mark Antony of Rome removed and executed him, replacing him with Sisines of Komana, who became Archelaus of Cappadocia.
GB83642. Bronze AE 17, HGC 856 (R2); Simonetta p. 48, 4 (uncertain attribution), VF, nice green patina, weight 3.16 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia-Mazaka mint, 42 - 36 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis left, wearing diadem, bow and quiver on shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY, stag standing left; scarce; $135.00 (€120.15)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator, 101 - 87 B.C.

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Ariarathes IX was one of the many sons of Mithradates VI, which the mighty King of Pontos used as a puppet ruler for Cappadocia. The boy was only 8 years of age when his father assigned him to a task that will eventually claim his life.
SH79753. Silver drachm, Simonetta 9a, SNG Cop Supp. 903, Cohen DCA 459, HGC 7 845 (S), VF, nice mature portrait, toned, marks and scratches, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.940 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebia mint, c. 89 - 87 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY EYΣEBOYΣ, Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike holding wreath in right, left hand supports spear and shield, A/N monogram inner left, IΓ (year 13) in exergue; scarce; $105.00 (€93.45)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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In 62, Tigranes, the Armenian king appointed by Rome, invaded Parthia. Parthia began building up for a strike against the Roman province of Syria. But in 63, Nero opted for a peace instead. The result was a deal where the Parthian prince Tiridates was made the Armenian king but was crowned in Rome by Emperor Nero. In the future, the king of Armenia was to be a Parthian prince, but his appointment required approval from the Romans. Tiridates was forced to come to Rome and partake in ceremonies meant to display Roman dominance. The deal was a considerable political victory for Nero. Nero became very popular in the eastern provinces of Rome and with the Parthians as well. The peace between Parthia and Rome lasted 50 years until Emperor Trajan of Rome invaded Armenia in 114.
RP72564. Silver didrachm, cf. RPC I 3647, Walker 477, RSC II Claudius and Nero 1a, BMCRE Nero 413, RIC I 620, Sydenham Caesarea 68, SRCV I 2055, F, porous, flan cracks, double struck, weight 6.874 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, c. 63 - 65 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD DIVI CLAVD F CAESAR AVG GERMA (or similar), laureate head of Nero right; reverse DIVOS CLAVD AVGVST GERMANIC PATER AVG, laureate head of Claudius right; $100.00 (€89.00)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos, 42 - 36 B.C.

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Ariarathes X Eusebes Philadelphos (Pious, brother-loving) was the king of Cappadocia from c. 42 - 36 B.C. He was of Persian and Greek ancestry. His father was King Ariobarzanes II of Cappadocia and his mother was Queen Athenais. He became king after his brother Ariobarzanes III Philoromaios was killed. His rule did not last long as Mark Antony of Rome removed and executed him, replacing him with Sisines of Komana, who became Archelaus of Cappadocia.
GB83633. Bronze AE 15, HGC 856 (R2); Simonetta p. 48, 4 (uncertain attribution), F, encrustations, small flan, weight 2.584 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia-Mazaka mint, 42 - 36 B.C.; obverse draped bust of Artemis left, wearing diadem, bow and quiver on shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIAPAΘOY, stag standing left; scarce; $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RS84088. Silver hemidrachm, Metcalf Conspectus 86b; Sydenham Caesarea 256; BMC Galatia p. 62, 142; SNGvA 6412; SNG Cop 223 var. (no cuirass, drapery far shoulder), VF, well centered on a tight flan, old-collection toning, weight 1.660 g, maximum diameter 13.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, 120 - 121 A.D.; obverse AYTO KAIC TPAI A∆PIANOC CEBACT, laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse Victory advancing right, wreath in extended right, palm frond over shoulder in left, ET ∆ (year 4) in right field; ex Dr. J. Hirsch, München, with his old dealer ticket, c. 1910(?); $90.00 (€80.10)
 


Eusebeia (Caesarea), Cappadocia, Time of Archelaus, King of Cappadocia, c. 36 B.C. - 17 A.D.

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
GB67798. Bronze AE 20, SNGvA 6334, SGCV II 5703, SNG Cop 166 corr. (laureate head/fillets vice lion skin on club), BMC Galatia -, SNG Fitzwilliam -, F, weight 6.498 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia (Caesarea) mint, c. 36 BC. - 17 A.D.; obverse bare-headed bust of Herakles right, lion skin draped over shoulders; reverse EVΣE BEIAΣ, lion skin draped on club, monogram below; rare; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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This type was issued to celebrate Corbulo's Armenian conquest. Corbulo was honored by Nero as the man who had brought this "triumph" but his popularity and influence with the army made him a potential rival. Together with the involvement of his son-in-law Lucius Annius Vinicianus in a foiled plot against Nero in 66, Corbulo became suspect in the eyes of the emperor. In 67, while journeying in Greece, Nero ordered him to be executed; upon hearing of this, Corbulo committed suicide.
RP70091. Silver hemidrachm, Sydenham Caesarea 81, RPC I 3644, RIC I 616, BMC Galatia -, VF, frosty surfaces, uneven toning, weight 1.309 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, c. 59 - 60 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD DIVI CLAVD F CAESAR AVG GERMANI, laureate head right; reverse Victory advancing right, raising wreath in right, palm frond over shoulder in left, ARME-NIAC flanking across field; rare; $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Cappadocian Kingdom, Ariobarzanes I Philoromaios, c. 96 - 63 B.C.

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Ariobarzanes I was a Cappadocian nobleman of obscure Persian descent. After the Roman Senate rejected the claims of Ariarathes IX, he was made king through a vote of Cappadocian citizens and with the support of the Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Sulla. He ruled a kingdom that was a Roman protectorate but was removed three separate times by Mithridates before not only securing but actually increasing his lands under Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War. He abdicated to make way for the rule of his son Ariobarzanes II.
GS72847. Silver drachm, Simonetta 45a; BMC Galatia p. 40, 22; Cohen DCA 460 (67/66 B.C.); HGC 7 846 (65/64 B.C.), F, uneven strike , die break on reverse, weight 3.953 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, Eusebeia under Mount Argaios mint, c. 65 - 64 B.C.; obverse diademed head right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ APIOBAPZANOY ΦIΛOPΩMAIOY, Athena Nikephoros standing left, Nike extending wreath in right hand, grounded shield and spear in left, ΓA monogram (control symbol or official's monogram) inner left, AΛ (year 31) in exergue (A is barely visible in hand); $80.00 (€71.20)
 


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Caesarea, Cappadocia

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Kayseri, Turkey was originally named Mazaca. It was renamed Eusebia by Ariarathes V Eusebes, King of Cappadocia, 163 - 130 B.C. The last king of Cappadocia, King Archelaus, renamed it "Caesarea in Cappadocia" to honor Caesar Augustus upon his death in 14 A.D. Muslim Arabs slightly modified the name into Kaisariyah, which became Kayseri when the Seljuk Turks took control, c. 1080 A.D.
RP78030. Bronze AE 22, Sydenham Caesarea 616; SNG Cop 311; BMC Galatia p. 93, 346 ff.; SGICV 3778; SNGvA -, aVF, tight flan, porous, weight 5.863 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Cappadocia, Caesarea mint, 243 - 244 A.D.; obverse AV KAI M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse MHTP KAI B NE, six stalks of grain bound together, ET - Z (year 7) divided across lower field; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $45.00 (€40.05)
 







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REFERENCES

Bland, R. "The last Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia" in Studia Arslan.
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (London, 1992 - ).
Cohen, E. Dated Coins of Antiquity: A comprehensive catalogue of the coins and how their numbers came about. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos...Kappadokia...Fifth to First Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Houghton, A., C. Lorber & O. Hoover. Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog. (Lancaster, 2002 - 2008).
Lindgren, H. & F. Kovacs. Ancient Bronze Coins of Asia Minor and the Levant. (San Mateo, 1985).
Lindgren, H. Lindgren III: Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Metcalf, W.E. The Silver Coinage of Cappadocia, Vespasian-Commodus. ANSNNM 166. (New York, 1996).
Mørkholm, O. ?The Coinages of Ariarathes VI and Arirathes VII of Cappadocia? in SNR 57 (1978).
Mørkholm, O. ?The Coinages of Ariarathes VIII and Arirathes IX of Cappadocia? in Essays Robinson.
RPC Online - http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Simonetta, A.M. The coinage of the Cappadocian kings: a revision and a catalogue of the Simonetta Collection. Parthica 9. (Pisa-Rome, 2007).
Simonetta, B. The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings. Typos II. (Fribourg, 1977).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of Caesarea in Cappadocia, with supplement by A. Malloy. (New York, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 7: Cyprus to India. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Römische Provinzprägungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 3: Pisidia, Lycaonia, Cilicia, Galatia, Cappadocia, Cyprus, [etc.]. (Berlin, 1964).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 7: Asia Minor: Lycia-Cappadocia. (London, 1967).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II. Münzen der Antike. Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Wroth, W. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Galatia, Cappadocia, and Syria. (London, 1899).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 24, 2017.
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Cappadocia Greek Coins