Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! Your favorite coin collector must be wishing for an ancient coin!!!! All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Ho Ho Ho Merry Christmas!!! Tell them you want a coin from FORVM for Christmas!!!! Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone 252-646-1958.

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Byzantine Coins ▸ Justinian DynastyView Options:  |  |  | 

Byzantine Coins of the Justinian Dynasty

Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 542, the Plague of Justinian, the Bubonic plague, spread from Egypt, killed at least 230,000 in Constantinople (before counting stopped) and perhaps two million or more in the rest of the empire. Justinian I contracted the disease but recovered.
BZ87969. Bronze pentanummium, large module; DOC I 269, Wroth BMC 155, Morrisson BnF I 87, Sommer 4.110, Hahn MIB I 142, Berk 159, SBCV 242, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, Choice gVF, excellent centering, dark brown patina, weight 2.257 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Theoupolis (Antioch) mint, 537 - 551 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large E (5 nummi) with cross at center made with center horizontal; rare; $110.00 (93.50)


Byzantine Empire, Maurice Tiberius, 13 August 582 - 22 November 602 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Maurice Tiberius achieved peace with Persia and stemmed losses in Italy and Africa, but lost much of the Balkans. When Focas, a junior officer, revolted Maurice and his son Theodosius were murdered.
BZ79566. Bronze half follis, Wroth BMC 231, DOC I 244 (not in the collection, refs. Wroth), Hahn MIB 118B, SBCV 559, Sommer 7.77, Morrisson BnF -, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, aVF, uneven strike left side of obverse weak, weight 12.083 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 180o, Carthage mint, c. 582 - 583 A.D.; obverse D N TIb mAVRIC P P AVC, helmeted and cuirassed facing bust, globus cruciger in right hand, shield on left shoulder ornamented with a horseman riding right; reverse round shield containing star, surmounted by cross; K/R-T/G (Carthage) flanking, XX between NM (20 nummi) in exergue; ex CGB; very rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity, for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Antioch was renamed Theoupolis after it was nearly destroyed by an earthquake on 29 November 528. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east. 6th Century Antioch

BZ87970. Bronze pentanummium, DOC I 271, Wroth BMC 157, Morrisson BnF I 92, Tolstoi 468, Ratto 570, Sommer 4.112, Hahn MIB I 161, Berk 255, SBCV 244, VF, dark patina, earthen deposits, flan crack, weight 1.629 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 551 - 560 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large E (5 nummi) with cross at center made with center horizontal, star right; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)


Byzantine Empire, Justin I, 10 July 518 - 1 August 527 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
A major earthquake on 24 August 358 caused extensive devastation to Nicomedia and was followed by a fire which completed the catastrophe. Nicomedia was rebuilt, but on a smaller scale. In the sixth century under Emperor Justinian I the city was extended with new public buildings. Situated on the roads leading to the capital, the city remained a major military center, playing an important role in the Byzantine campaigns against the Caliphate. From the 840s on, Nicomedia was the capital of the thema of the Optimatoi. By that time, most of the old, seawards city had been abandoned and is described by the Persian geographer Ibn Khurdadhbih as lying in ruins. The settlement was restricted to the hilltop citadel. In the 1080s, the city served as the main military base for Alexios I Komnenos in his campaigns against the Seljuk Turks, and the First and Second Crusades both encamped there. The city was held by the Latin Empire between 1204 and c. 1240, when it was recovered by John III Vatatzes. It remained in Byzantine control for a further century, but following the Byzantine defeat at the Battle of Bapheus in 1302, it was threatened by the rising Ottoman beylik. The city was twice blockaded by the Ottomans (in 1304 and 1330) before finally succumbing in 1337.
BZ82687. Bronze follis, DOC I 28b, Morrisson BnF I 2/Ni/AE/01, Wroth BMC 53, Ratto 417, Hahn MIB I 35, Sommer 2.26, Berk 65, SBCV 83, Tolstoi -, gF, well centered, very dark green patina, highlighting red earthen deposits, edge split/crack, weight 13.231 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 518 - 522 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse large M (40 nummi) between two stars, cross above, B (2nd officina) below, NIKM (Nicomedia) in exergue; from an American Collector; $70.00 (59.50)


Byzantine Empire, Justinian I, 4 April 527 - 14 November 565 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 562, Belisarius stood trial for corruption in Constantinople, possibly with Procopius acting as praefectus urbi. He was found guilty and sent to prison.
BZ67007. Bronze decanummium, DOC I 353 (Ravenna), Wroth BMC 407 (Ravenna), SBCV 326 (Ravenna), Hahn MIB I 29a (Rome), Sommer 4.155 (Rome), Ratto -, F, nice green patina, weight 2.846 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 180o, Ravenna or Rome mint, 562 - 563 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger in right, shield in left; reverse large I (10 nummi), ANNO left, XX/XVI (regnal year 36) right, all within wreath, no mintmark; $36.00 (30.60)











Catalog current as of Saturday, December 15, 2018.
Page created in 0.703 seconds.
Justinian Dynasty