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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Silver Under $100||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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RS73963. Silver tetradrachm, Dattari 2141/2143; Milne 1927; Geissen 1562; Curtis 571/572; Kampmann 35.384; Emmett 1358/11; BMC Alexandria -, F, inscriptions partially unstruck and off flan, weight 14.284 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 147 - 28 Aug 148 A.D.; obverse ANTWNEINOC CEB EYCEB (clockwise from upper right), laureate head right; reverse L EY∆EKATOY (year 11), Apollo Didymaios (Milesios) standing facing, laureate, nude, small stag in extended right hand, bow in left at side; scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Rhegion, Bruttium, Italy, c. 415 - 387 B.C.

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Rhegion reached great artistic and cultural heights. It was home to academies, such as the Pythagorean School, and to well-known poets, historians and sculptors such Ibycus, Ippy, and Pythagoras. It was an important ally of the Roman Republic. Rhegium flourished during the Imperial Age but was devastated by several major earthquakes and tsunami. St. Paul passed through Rhegium on his final voyage to Rome (Acts XXVIII:13).
GS79976. Silver litra, SNG Cop 1936; SNG ANS 670; SNG Mnchen 1588; SNG Tb 536; HN Italy 2495; BMC Italy p. 376, 30, VF, well centered, nice style, uneven toning, light corrosion, weight 0.722 g, maximum diameter 10.2 mm, die axis 90o, Rhegion mint, c. 415 - 387 B.C.; obverse facing lion scalp mask; reverse olive sprig with two olives, PH between the leaves; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Caria (Uncertain City), c. 460 - 440 B.C.

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Troxell notes that hoard provinces indicate this type was struck in Caria, however, the issuing city remains unknown. SNG Kayhan identifies the denomination as a Milesian standard tetartemorion. SNG Keckman lists it as a Persic hemiobol.
GS89049. Silver hemiobol, Troxell Carians 11C, SNG Keckman 913 ff.; cf. SNG Kayhan 968 ff. (no star), SNG Tb 3329 (same), VF, toned, light marks, obverse slightly off center, light marks, small edge crack, weight 0.340 g, maximum diameter 7.9 mm, die axis 180o, Carian mint, c. 460 - 440 B.C.; obverse foreparts of two bulls confronted; reverse forepart of bull left, star below; ex Forum (2014); scarce; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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During Philip's reign the 1000th anniversary of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held. This coin was issued as part of that celebration and the reverse undoubted depicts one of the animals displayed during the games.
RS89484. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 21, RSC IV 189, Hunter III 48, SRCV III 8959, Choice gVF, excellent portrait, excellent centering, struck with a worn reverse die, edge cracks, weight 4.109 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 180o, 6th officina, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG (Secular games [provided by] the Emperors), antelope walking left, VI in exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. It appears, however, she kept her wheel. She just hid it under her seat.
RS89488. Silver denarius, RIC IV 189b; RSC III 461; BMCRE V p. 240, 432; Hunter 49; SRCV II 6334, VF, nice portrait, well centered, light tone, edge cracks, weight 2.912 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 203 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XI COS III P P, Fortuna seated left, feet on low stool, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, scepter in left hand, wheel under seat; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some early U.S. coins.
RS89491. Silver denarius, RIC IV 161, RSC III 143, BMCRE V 511, SRCV III 6817, Hunter III -, VF, excellent portrait, well centered on a tight flan, frosty surfaces, edge cracks, weight 2.981 g, maximum diameter 19.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 208 - 210 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS AVG, Libertas standing half left, head left, pileus in right hand, long rod vertical behind in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RS89492. Silver denarius, RIC IV 82; RSC III 422; BMCRE V p. 251, 484; Hunter III 28; SRCV II 6860, Choice VF, excellent portrait, full borders centering, high points flatly struck, edge cracks, weight 3.287 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 205 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PONTIF TR P VIII COS II (priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 8 years, consul for the 2nd time), Salus seated left, feeding snake coiled around altar, left arm resting on side of throne; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Roman Republic, P. Plautius Hypsaeus, c. 60 B.C.

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The Hypsaei claimed to trace their descent from Neptune and his daughter Leukonoe. This reverse type also appears to claim that the moneyer's ancestor captured Privernum in 329 B.C. We leave it to the reader to judge the validity of the first claim. As for the second, the victorious Consul at Privernum was C. Plautius Decianus, not C. Plautius Hypsaei.
RR91018. Silver denarius, RSC I Plautia 11, Crawford 420/1, Sydenham 910, Russo RBW 1513, BMCRR I Rome 3841, SRCV I 375, aVF/F, rose toning, scratches, porosity, weight 3.421 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 60 B.C.; obverse P YPSAE S C, head of Neptune right, trident behind; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, CEPIT upward on right, C YPSAE COS / PRIV in exergue; from the Eric J. Engstrom Collection; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Leontini, Sicily, c. 476 - 466 B.C., Unofficial Imitative

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The low weight, crude style, and retrograde ethnic indicate this was not an official issue of the city but, more likely, an imitative. Hoover identifies it as an imitative in the Handbook of Coins of Sicily (HGC 2).
GS91173. Silver litra, cf. HGC 2 688 (R2) (same); BMC Sicily p. 88; 22 (same retrograde legend, 0.635g); Boehringer Leontini pl. 10, B (similarly crude), VF, well centered, crude style, half the usual weight, weight 0.289 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 330o, unofficial Sicilian mint, c. 476 - 466 B.C.; obverse crude facing lion scalp, linear border; reverse ΛE-ON (retrograde, counterclockwise from upper right), barley kernel, linear border; ex Beast Coins, ex Imperial Coins & Artifacts; very rare; $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D.

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Two days before his death, Antoninus was at his ancestral estate at Lorium, in Etruria, about twelve miles (19 km) from Rome. He ate Alpine cheese at dinner quite greedily. In the night he vomited; he had a fever the next day. The day after that, 7 March 161, he summoned the imperial council, and passed the state and his daughter to Marcus. The emperor gave the keynote to his life in the last word that he uttered when the tribune of the night-watch came to ask the password - "aequanimitas" (equanimity). He then turned over, as if going to sleep, and died. His death closed out the longest reign since Augustus (surpassing Tiberius by a couple of months).
RS91218. Silver denarius, RIC III MA429; MIR 18 23-4/10; RSC II 154; BMCRE IV p. 392, 41; Hunter II 2; SRCV II 5190, VF, nice portrait, light toning, strong flow lines, reverse died wear, small edge cracks, weight 2.761 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 161 A.D.; obverse DIVVS ANTONINVS, bare head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right on bar, wings open, head turned back left; ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 76, part of Lot 942 (2019); $110.00 SALE |PRICE| $99.00




  



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Silver Under $100