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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Budget & Wholesale ▸ Silver Under $100View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Silver Coins Under $100

Coins are listed from highest price to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 December 192 A.D.

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The Temple of Apollo Palatinus, on the Palatine Hill, was dedicated by Octavian on 9 October 28 B.C. in return for vows made for his victories over Sextus Pompeius at the Battle of Naulochus in 36 B.C. and over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium 31 B.C. It was built on a site where a lightning bolt had struck. Augustus' private house was directly connected to the terrace of the sanctuary. Ancient sources state the temple had ivory doors and held numerous works of sculpture. The remains were excavated in the 1960s.
RS85050. Silver denarius, Szaivert MIR 18 p.165, 805; BMCRE IV 271, pl. 97, 17 (aureus); RIC III 197 (S) var. (obv. leg.), RSC II 30 var. (same), Hunter II - (clv), F, dark deposits, rough, lamination defects, edge cracks, weight 2.082 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 189 A.D.; obverse M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P, laureate head right; reverse APOLLINI PALATINO, Apollo Palatinus standing facing, head right, laureate and wearing long robe, plectrum in right hand, lyre resting on a column in left hand; there were only two specimens of this type in the Reka Devnia Hoard, and there are none on coin archives.; extremely rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Persian Empire, Philistia (Gaza or Samaria), c. 375 - 333 B.C., Imitative of Athens

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A Persian Period imitation of Athenian types from the Holy Land. In the past these coins were all attributed to Gaza, however, recent hoard finds indicate a mint at Ashkelon probably also struck this type. It is likely that at least several small mints struck these imitative types.
JD86845. Silver hemiobol, cf. Samaria Hoard pls. 50 - 51, SH306 ff.; SNG ANS 20, gF, toned, die wear, rough/porous, irregular flan, edge chips, weight 0.216 g, maximum diameter 6.6 mm, die axis 270o, Gaza(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, hair in parallel bands, very large eye in profile; reverse owl standing right, wings closed, head facing, olive spray with one olive between two leaves behind (no crescent visible), AΘE downward on right (off flan), all in incuse square; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Persian Empire, Philistia (Gaza or Samaria), c. 375 - 333 B.C., Imitative of Athens

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A Persian Period imitation of Athenian types from the Holy Land. In the past these coins were all attributed to Gaza, however, recent hoard finds indicate a mint at Ashkelon probably also struck this type. It is likely that at least several small mints struck these imitative types.
JD86846. Silver obol, cf. Samaria Hoard pls. 45 - 50, SH269 ff.; Gitler-Tal 4.4.IX.1O; SNG ANS 18; Sofaer Gaza pl. 103, 6, F, toned, rough, tight rhomboid flan, weight 0.650 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 0o, Gaza(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl, hair in parallel bands, eye in profile; reverse owl standing right, wings closed, head facing, olive spray with one olive between two leaves and a crescent behind, AΘE downward on right, all in incuse square, no Aramaic inscription; ex Beast Coins; $100.00 (85.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The reverse announces that Septimius has completed vows (prayers and sacrifices) to ask the gods for 20 years of rule. In a religious context, votum, plural vota, is a vow or promise made to a deity. The word comes from the past participle of voveo, vovere; as the result of the verbal action, a vow, or promise. The votum is an aspect of the contractual nature of Roman religion and sacrifice, a bargaining expressed by "do ut des" (I give that you might give).
RS87222. Silver denarius, RIC IV 308, RSC III 791, BMCRE V 375, Hunter III 103, SRCV II 6393, VF, well centered, toned, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 201 - 210 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse VOTA SVSCEPTA XX, Severus (his pointy beard well visible) sacrificing left over a lit tripod altar; $100.00 (85.00)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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The palladium, a small figure of Minerva (Pallas Athena) holding a spear and shield, had a mythological origin from Troy. Troy was believed to be safe from foreign enemies as long as the palladium remained within the city walls. But Odysseus and Diomedes stole the image and soon after the Greeks took the city. The palladium was later taken by Aeneas to Rome where for centuries it was kept in the temple of Vesta in the Forum. In Late Antiquity, it was rumored that Constantine had taken the palladium to Constantinople and buried it under the Column of Constantine.
RS87249. Silver denarius, RIC IV 360; RSC III 81; BMCRE VI p. 152, 381; SRCV II 8217, VF, toned, porous, weight 2.932 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 226 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, veiled head left, palladium in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; $100.00 (85.00)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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The kithara (cithara) was an ancient stringed musical instrument resembling the lyre, a simpler two-stringed folk-instrument, but with seven strings and a flat back. A symbol of Apollo, credited with inventing it, the kithara's origins were likely Asiatic. The kithara was primarily used by professional musicians, called kitharodes. In modern Greek, the word kithara has come to mean "guitar."
RS87250. Silver denarius, RIC IV 114, RSC IV 238, SRCV III 8679, Hunter - (p. lxxxiv), Choice VF, well centered, nice portrait die wear, small edge crack, weight 2.896 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 240 - 241 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P III COS II P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for 3 years, consul 2 times, father of the country), Apollo seated left, laurel branch in right hand, resting left arm on lyre; $100.00 (85.00)


Lycia, Uncertain Dynast, c. 400 - 350 B.C.

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Although we cannot find a match with this inscription, Historia Numorum lists lion scalp and helmeted head of Athena types struck by several dynasts in the first half of the 4th century B.C.
GA87325. Silver obol, Apparently unpublished, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Tb -, Vismara -, Podalia Hoard -, BMC Lycia -, F/VF, significant edge chip, weight 0.579 g, maximum diameter 10.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse lion scalp facing, from above; reverse head of Athena left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, Lycian letters (EK?) above, dot border, all within a round incuse; extremely rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

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Providentia is the personification of the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This ability was considered essential for the emperor and providentia was among the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia, memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding) are the three main components of prudentia, the knowledge what is good or bad or neither.

Under Gordian III the same coin types were often struck at both Rome and Antioch. One way to distinguish Gordian's coins struck at Antioch from those struck at Rome is the shape of the letter M. On coins from Antioch, M usually resembles a V in the middle of two I's, thus IVI. From the Rome mint, M normally resembles two lambdas, thus ΛΛ.
RS87886. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 172, RSC IV 196a, SRCV III 8634 var. (Rome), VF, light toning, slightly irregular oval flan, light bumps and scratches, coppery spot, tiny edge crack, weight 3.574 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 239 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse P M TR P II COS P P (high priest, holder of Tribunitian power for two years, consul, father of the country), Providentia standing left, globe in right hand, transverse scepter in left; ex Beast Coins; ex Harlan Berk, CICF Show, Apr 2013; $100.00 (85.00)


Terone, Macedonia, c. 490 - 480 B.C.

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"The site of the ancient city of Terone is located in the Chalkidike on the south-west coast of Sithonia. The site was occupied at various times from the third millennium BC until the nineteenth century A.D. Ancient literary sources refer to the occupation of the site from the archaic to the Hellenistic period. It was mentioned in the accounts in Thucydides of the siege by Brasidas in 424/3 and its recovery by the Athenians in 422." -- Nicholas Hardwick in "The Coinage of Terone from the Fifth to the Fourth Centuries BC" in Studies Price.
GA88085. Silver 1/12 stater, cf. Hardwick group II, pl. 29, 7; HGC 3 710 (R2, grape bunch on side of oinochoe); SNG ANS 748 (1/6th stater); BMC Macedonia p. 107, 4 (same), VF, centered, nice toning, corrosion, weight 1.196 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, Terone (Toroni, Greece) mint, c. 490 - 480 B.C.; obverse oinochoe, handle on right; reverse quadripartite incuse square; ; very rare; $100.00 (85.00)


Phokaia, Ionia, c. 521 - 478 B.C.

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Phokaia was the most northerly of the Ionian communities in Anatolia and was the mother city of many colonies in the western Mediterranean area, including Massalia (modern Marseille, France). This type (with approximately the same weight) is identified in references variously as a diobol, a trihemiobol, a hemihekte, or a 1/12 stater.
GA88087. Silver hemihekte, Cahn Ionische 2, SNG Kayhan 522, SNGvA 1813, Rosen 597 (trihemiobol), Klein 452 (diobol), VF, centered on a crowded flan, etched surfaces, weight 1.247 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, Phokaia (Foca, Turkey) mint, late 6th century B.C.; obverse head of nymph left, curly hair in three rows of dots, sakkos ornamented with a cross band of pearls, round earring with six pearls; reverse irregular quadripartite incuse square; $100.00 (85.00)




  



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Catalog current as of Wednesday, December 12, 2018.
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Silver Under $100