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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ HeliosView Options:  |  |  | 

Helios

Helios was imagined as a handsome Sun god crowned with the shining aureole of the sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night. Helios is sometimes identified with Apollo. Greek poets never described Apollo driving the chariot of the sun, but it was common practice for Latin poets. Worship of Helios (and later Sol) was sometimes considered a cult in conflict with traditional worship.


Collossae, Phrygia, c 177 - 192 A.D.

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Colossae was on the Lycus (a tributary of the Maeander River) 10 miles southeast of Laodicea, 13 miles from Hierapolis, and 3 miles from Mount Cadmus. In the 4th century B.C., Xenophon described it as one of six large cities of Phrygia. Antiochus the Great relocated two thousand Jewish families from Babylonia and Mesopotamia to Colossae. The city's commerce included trade in wool and woven fabric. It was known for its religious fusion (syncretism) of Jewish, Gnostic, and pagan influences, described in the first century A.D. as an angel-cult. The Apostle Paul addressed an epistle (letter) to the city's Christian community which addressed the cult and exalted the supremacy of Jesus Christ. The city was overrun by the Saracens in the 7th and 8th centuries A.D. and ultimately destroyed by the Turks in the 12th century. As of 2015, it had never been excavated, but there are plans for an Australian-led expedition.
RP86524. Bronze AE 32, RPC Online temp 1899; vA Phrygiens II 496 - 505; SNGvA 3765; SNG Mn 307; SNG Hunt 1938; McClean III 8789; BMC Phrygia p. 155, 5 (all same dies?), F, broad flan, earthen deposits, porous, weight 19.959 g, maximum diameter 32.3 mm, die axis 180o, Colossae mint, c. 177 - 192 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC - KOΛOCCHNΩ-N, laureate head of young Demos right; reverse Helios standing in galloping quadriga, facing, wearing radiate crown, globe in left hand, torch in right hand, KO-ΛOC/CH-NΩN in two divided lines below horses; ex David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $360.00 (306.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C.

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Philip's reign was principally marked by an unsuccessful struggle against the emerging power of Rome. Philip was attractive and charismatic as a young man. A dashing and courageous warrior, he was inevitably compared to Alexander the Great and was nicknamed the darling of all Greece.
GB83488. Bronze AE 25, Mamroth Bronze 24a; SNG Alpha Bank 1110, SNG Mnchen 1181; SNG Cop 1258 ff. var. (monograms), AMNG III/2 25 var. (same), aVF, nice sea-green patina, edge bump, edge split, marks, light corrosion, weight 13.892 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, Macedonian mint, 183 - 182 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Helios right; reverse winged thunderbolt, ∆I monogram over BAΣIΛEΩΣ above , ΦIΛIΠΠOY below, all within oak wreath; $110.00 (93.50)


Hierapolis-Kastabala, Cilicia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Hierapolis-Kastabala was an ancient city in Cilicia Pedias, three kilometers north ancient Pyramus. Alexander the Great stopped at Kastabala before the Battle of Issus in 333 B.C. Antiochus IV refounded the city with the name Hierapolis. In the first century B.C., Hierapolis was the capital of a small local kingdom under the rule of the former Cilician pirate Tarcondimotus I, an ally of Mark Antony. Cicero referred to the city as Rome's most loyal ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people. The city was known for its temple of Artemis Perasia. Strabo wrote of her priestesses who, in a trance, would walk barefoot over hot coals without damage.
GY73092. Bronze AE 15, cf. CNG e-auction 250, lot 112; otherwise apparently unpublished; SNG BnF -, SNG Levante -, SNGvA -, SNG Cop -, BMC Lycaonia -, F, well centered, highlighting "desert" patina, some corrosion, weight 2.776 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 90o, Cilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala mint, 2nd - 1st centuries B.C.; obverse radiate, draped bust of Helios right, dotted border; reverse eagle standing left on torch, wings open, head left, IEPOΠOΛITΩN above, ΠPOΣ TΩI ΠYPA[NA?] below; extremely rare; $80.00 (68.00)


Side, Pamphylia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Side was founded by Greeks from Cyme, Aeolis, most likely in the 7th century B.C. The settlers started using the local language and over time forgot their native Greek. Excavations have revealed inscriptions written in this language, still undeciphered, dating from as late as the 2nd century B.C. The name Side is from this indigenous Anatolian language and means pomegranate.
GB90296. Bronze AE 18, BMC Lycia p. 151, 70 (with same Helios countermark); SNG Cop 411 (same); SNG BnF 750 ff.; SNG PfPs 501; Lindgren -, VF, unusually broad flan with full legends, nice green patina, reverse flattened by countermarking, weight 2.667 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Side (Antalya Province, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, in crested Corinthian helmet; countermarks: facing head of Helios, helmeted head of Athena right, ΣI∆HTΩN horizontal above; reverse Nike advancing left, holding wreath; wearing long chiton, peplos around waist and left arm, pomegranate in left field, ΣI∆H−TΩN horizontal above divided by Nike's head; ex Frascatius Ancient Coins; $60.00 (51.00)


Malaka, Punic Iberia, 175 - 91 B.C.

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Phoenicians from Tyre founded Malaka (Mlaga, Spain today) about 770 B.C. The name was probably derived from the Phoenician word for "salt" because fish was salted near the harbor. After a period of Carthaginian rule, Malaka became part of the Roman Empire. The Roman city enjoyed remarkable development under a special law, the Lex Flavia Malacitana. A Roman theater was built at this time. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, it was ruled first by the Visigoths and then the Byzantine Empire (550621). It was regained by the Visigoths in 621 and ruled by them until the Umayyad Muslim conquest in 711.
RP84866. Bronze AE 28, Villaronga-Benages 786, Burgos 1727, Villaronga CNH 9, SNG Lorichs 93, SNG BM Spain 357, aVF, double struck, encrustations, corrosion, ragged edge, weight 13.180 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 90o, Malaka (Mlaga, Spain) mint, 175 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Vulcan right, bearded and wearing conical cap, tongs behind, neo-Punic inscription MLK outer left, all within laurel wreath; reverse radiate bust of Helios facing; ex Pegasi Numismatics ($175); $60.00 (51.00)







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 23, 2018.
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Helios