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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Greek Coins ▸ Geographic - All Periods ▸ Macedonia ▸ PhilippiView Options:  |  |  | 

Philippi, Macedonia

Philippi was established by Philip II of Macedonia on the site of the Thasian colony of Krinides. It was founded to take control of the neighboring gold mines and control the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications to control the passage, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Philippi preserved its autonomy until it was fully integrated into the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip V. Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi in the plain to the west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veteran soldiers, probably from legion XXVIII, to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian reorganized the colony, and established more settlers there, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard and other Italians. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.


Philippi, Macedonia, 41 - 68 A.D.

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This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus.
RP83476. Bronze AE 23, RPC I 1651, Varbanov III 3229, SGICV 32, SNG Cop 305, AMNG III 14, BMC Macedonia 23, VF, centered on a tight flan, grainy green patina, small edge cracks, weight 4.619 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, 41 - 68 A.D.; obverse VIC - AVG, Victory standing left on base, raising wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; reverse COHOR PRAE PHIL, three standards; $120.00 (102.00)


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia, Countermark of Parium

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Philippi was founded by Philip II of Macedonia to control the neighboring gold mines and the route between Amphipolis and Neapolis. Philip constructed fortifications, sent colonists, and established a mint in the city. Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veterans to colonize the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 B.C., Octavian reorganized the colony with more Italian settlers, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 B.C., when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.
RP85361. Bronze semis, RPC I 1660 (21 spec.); BMC Macedonia p., 93 (with c/m); SNG Cop 285 (same); McClean 7662; c/m: Howgego 303 (Parium), F, c/m: F; toned coppery surfaces, porous, somewhat irregular flan with edge cracks, weight 3.772 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Philippi (near Filippoi, Greece) mint, 25 Jan 41 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse TI CLAV, bare head of Claudius left; countermark: Capricorn left in a rectangular punch; reverse Priest and yoke of two oxen plowing right; $90.00 (76.50)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Philippi, Macedonia

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Mark Antony and Octavian defeated the assassins of Caesar, Marcus Junius Brutus and Cassius, at the Battle of Philippi in the plain to the west of the city in October 42 B.C. They released some of their veteran soldiers, probably from legion XXVIII, to colonized the city, which was refounded as Colonia Victrix Philippensium. In 30 BC, Octavian became Roman emperor, reorganized the colony, and established more settlers there, veterans possibly from the Praetorian Guard and other Italians. The city was renamed Colonia Iulia Philippensis, and then Colonia Augusta Iulia Philippensis after January, 27 BC, when Octavian received the title Augustus from the Roman Senate.
RP77240. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1656; Varbanov III 3770 (R4); BMC Mysia p. 103, 86 (Parium); SNG Cop IV 282 (same), gF, green patina, weight 4.887 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 0o, Philippi mint, obverse AVG, bare head right; reverse two priests with yoke of two oxen right, plowing the pomerium (sacred boundary), founding the new colony; $75.00 (63.75)







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REFERENCES

Bellinger, A. "Philippi in Macedonia" in ANSMN 11 (1964).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripolls. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (London, 1992 and suppl.).
Gaebler, H. Die antiken Mnzen von Makedonia und Paionia, Die antiken Mnzen Nord-Griechenlands Vol. III. (Berlin, 1906).
Head, B. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins: European Mints. (San Mateo, 1989).
Lindgren, H. Ancient Greek Bronze Coins. (Quarryville, 1993).
Moushmov, N. Ancient Coins of the Balkan Peninsula. (1912).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values. (London, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, USA, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 7: Macedonia 1 (Cities, Thraco-Macedonian Tribes, Paeonian kings). (New York, 1997).
Varbanov, I. Greek Imperial Coins And Their Values, Vol. III: Thrace (from Perinthus to Trajanopolis), Chersonesos Thraciae, Insula Thraciae, Macedonia. (Bourgas, 2007).

Catalog current as of Sunday, November 19, 2017.
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Philippi, Macedonia