Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Denominations ▸ Eastern DenariiView Options:  |  |  |   

Eastern Denarii

Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XI

Click for a larger photo
This may have been a legion raised by Antony and disbanded by Augustus. The XI Claudia, an old legion of Caesar's, fought for Octavian (and won the title Actiaca at the battle of Actium).
SL79267. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/25, Sydenham 1229, BMCRR II East 203, RSC I 39, NGC F, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, banker's marks (2400602-008), toned, weight 3.48 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 180o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XI, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; NGC certified (slabbed); $450.00 (400.50)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XII

Click for a larger photo
This old Caesarean legion was known at different times as Victrix, Antiquae, Paterna and finally XII Fulminata ('the thunderers'). Its veterans settled (among other places) in Patras in Greece. After fighting without great distinction in the First Jewish Revolt, the legion was transferred to Melitene in Cappadocia, where it remained for several hundred years.
RR76782. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/20, Sydenham 1224, BMCRR II East 198, RSC I 34, VF, toned, contact marks, graffiti, weight 3.561 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XII, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $320.00 (284.80) ON RESERVE


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG XIX

Click for a larger photo
Pliny xxxiii 9 notes, ?Antonius as Triumvir mixed iron (sic) into his denarii.? Actually, it was copper that Antony used to debase his denarii and extend his budget. Some coppery spots are clearly visible on the reverse of this coin. Most of Antony's legionary denarii are well worn. The Roman people knew these legionary denarii were debased. When deciding which coins to hoard and save, and which to spend, they would choose good silver to save and spend Antony's debased denarii before all others. Most legionary denarii were heavily circulated and are heavily worn.
RR83582. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/35, Sydenham 1242, BMCRR II East 214, RSC I 55, VF, toned, coppery areas, light scratches and marks, a little off-center, weight 3.681 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 270o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / IIIVIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - XIX, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; ex Roma Numismatics e-sale 21, lot 658; $200.00 (178.00)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Julia Domna was born in Emesa in 170 A.D. She was the youngest daughter of high-priest Julius Bassianus, a descendant of the Royal House of Emesa. Emesa was famous for its Temple of the Sun, the center of worship for the ancient pagan cult El-Gebal (or Elagabal). El-Gebal, worshiped in the form of a conical black stone, was the Aramaic name for the Syrian Sun God and means God of the Mountain. Emesa was also the birthplace of three other Roman empresses, Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea and Julia Soaemias, and one emperor, Julia Domna's nephew, Elagabalus.
RS84440. Silver denarius, RSC III 65, RIC IV S624 (S), BMCRE p. 103 note citing Cohen 65 (Hamburger Coll.), SRCV II -, VF, nice style, toned, porous, light marks, small deposits, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 45o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse FORTVN REDVC, Fortuna seated left on throne without back, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ; rare; $150.00 (133.50)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG X

Click for a larger photo
Antony's legion X may have been disbanded by Augustus. The famous X Fretensis ('from the Channel') fought for Octavian, and the early history of X Gemina is obscure.
RR77173. Silver denarius, Crawford 544/24, Sydenham 1228, BMCRR II East 202, RSC I 38, F, weight 3.499 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - X, aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $135.00 (120.15)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RS77438. Silver denarius, RIC IV 526; RSC III 102; BMCRE V p. 299, 732; Hunter III 202; SRCV II -, VF, nice eastern style, weight 2.858 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 195o, Laodicea ad Mar (Latakia, Syria) mint, 202 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse COS III P P, Victory advancing left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand; $135.00 (120.15)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Valid Hope," perhaps to be translated as "Optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS76958. Silver denarius, SRCV II 6267, RIC IV 369, RSC III 68, BMCRE V 343, VF, excellent eastern style portrait, some light corrosion, weight 2.130 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left; $125.00 (111.25)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
RR75376. Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR II East 190, RSC I 27 ff., Fair, weight 2.930 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 45o, Patrae(?) mint, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANTAVG / III VIRRPC, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow; reverse LEG - [...], aquila (legionary eagle) between two legionary standards; $100.00 (89.00)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 193, Laodicea was sacked by the governor of Syria, Pescennius Niger, in his revolt against Septimius Severus. In 194, Septimius Severus reorganized Syria into five new provinces. One of these, Coele-Syria, including all of northern Syria, briefly had its capital in Laodicea before reverting to Antioch. Septimius sought to punish Antioch for having supported Pescennius Niger. Septimius Severus endowed Laodicea with four colonnaded streets, baths, a theater, a hippodrome, numerous sanctuaries and other public buildings in the city. The city was a key strategic seaport for Roman Syria.
RS90492. Silver denarius, RIC IV 511(a), RSC III 4 55a; BMCRE V p. 294, 712; SRCV II -, aEF, toned, nice style, good strike, weight 3.375 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Laodicea ad Mare (Latakia, Syria) mint, 200 A.D.; obverse L SEPT SEV AVG IMP XI PART MAX, laureate head right; reverse P MAX TR P VIII COS II P P, Fides standing facing, head left, raising a plate of fruits in right, two stalks of grain downward in left; $95.00 (84.55)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In 231, Severus Alexander led a formidable army into the east. In a great battle Alexander defeated Artaxerxes and drove him back from the frontiers of Rome. He returned to Rome, where he received a triumph for his victory over the Persians.
RS73592. Silver denarius, RSC III 561, RIC IV 302, BMCRE VI 1020, Hunter III 190 var. (no cuirass), cf. SRCV II 7930 (obv legend, star right on rev, etc.), VF, well centered, interesting eastern style, weight 2.643 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 228 - 231 A.D.; obverse IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate and draped bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVG (the victory of the Emperor), Victory advancing right, wreath raised in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder; $95.00 (84.55)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Monday, February 20, 2017.
Page created in 1.233 seconds
Eastern Denarii