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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Judean & Biblical Coins| ▸ |Biblical Coins| ▸ |Cities in the Bible||View Options:  |  |  | 

Cities in the Bible

The coins below were minted by cities that are mentioned in the bible. Click here to read about the travels of Paul.


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Struck by Agrippa II(?), Caesarea Maritima(?), Syria Palestina

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Julius Marcus Agrippa was a teenager studying in Rome when his father died. He was too young to rule and his father's kingdom was made a Roman province. About 6 years later, he was given the kingdom of his uncle Herod of Chalcis. Later more was added. It was before Herod Agrippa II that Saint Paul was tried. Agrippa sided with the Romans during the Jewish rebellion. Though he continued to rule until at least 95 A.D., the temple was destroyed and in the end his assigned territories were in Syria, not Judaea. The attribution to a mint at Caesarea Maritima under Agrippa II is traditional, and supported by recorded finds 90% of which are around Caesarea Maritima. Still, it may have been struck at Caesarea Paneas, which better fits the style, or it may have been struck by a Roman procurator.
SL89827. Bronze AE 24, RPC I 4848 (6 spec.); Hendin 1263; Meshorer TJC 356; SNG ANS 744; BMC Palestine p. 12, 3; Rosenberger 1; Kadman -, NGC F, strike 4/5, surface 3/5, Agrippa II, 49 - 95, Caesarea (4283488-004), weight 8.78 g, maximum diameter 24.0 mm, die axis 45o, Caesarea Maritima (or Paneas?) mint, c. 49 - Oct 54 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IM P P, laureate head of Claudius right; reverse inverted anchor with ring on each end, within oak wreath; scarce; $500.00 SALE |PRICE| $450.00


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

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Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was the capital of the Roman province of Judaea, the seat of the procurators, and the headquarters of the Roman troops. It was founded by Herod the Great and named after Caesar Augustus.
JD93012. Bronze AE 32, Hendin 836, SNG ANS 766, Rosenberger 24, Kadman Caesarea 27, F, green patina, grainy, earthen deposits, weight 18.384 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 0o, Caesarea Maritima mint, obverse IMP TRA HADRIANO CAES AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL I FL AVG, Hadrian, as priest-founder, plowing right with oxen, Nike flying left above holding wreath, CAESAREN in exergue; from The Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection (surface find, Caesarea, Israel, 1972); $300.00 SALE |PRICE| $270.00


Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

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We might expect the K on the reverse right to indicate regnal year 20. BMC Ptolemies notes, however, the title ΣΩTHPOΣ (savior) did not appear on the coinage until Ptolemy II's regnal year 25. On some very similar specimens, it is not just a K but instead a KE ligature (), which has been interpreted to mean year 25. Svoronos describes this type (Sv 723) with a KE ligature but the plate coin actually looks like a plain K. It seems likely that a KE ligature was intended but for some specimens it was not correctly engraved or not fully struck.
SH82655. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Milan 142 (same rev. die); cf. Svoronos 723 (ligate KE); BMC Ptolemies p. 29, 55 (same); SNG Cop 509 (same), Weiser -, Noeske -, aVF, test marks, obverse a little off center, bumps and scratches, graffito on reverse before eagles neck, weight 13.808 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, 261 - 260 BC; obverse diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ (Ptolemy Savior), eagle standing on thunderbolt left, ΣI over ∆I inner left, K inner right; ex Bertolami Fine Arts e-auction 57 (Mar 2018), lot 46; ex Pavlos Pavlou Collection; rare; $270.00 SALE |PRICE| $243.00


Julia Maesa, Augusta 8 June 218 - 224 or 225 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria

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Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel. It is the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. The city was refounded as Flavia Neopolis after the suppression of the Jewish Revolt. Nablus is home to about half the remaining worldwide Samaritan population of 600.
JD72682. Bronze AE 20, Sofaer pl. 53,122; Rosenberger 59; BMC Samaria p. 62, 111; Lindgren III 1510, gVF, nice green patina with earthen highlighting, typical tight flan, weight 7.492 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Neapolis mint, obverse IOYΛIA MAICA CEB, draped bust right wearing stephane; reverse ΦΛ NEAC-ΠOΛE CVP, Tyche standing facing, head left, holding rudder by tiller in right, cornucopia in left; rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Ascalon, Syria Palaestina

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Phanebal was a deity specific to Ascalon. Mr. Tameanko, in his book, Monumental Coins, theorizes that the Temple of Phanebal was designed to imitate the sacred First Temple in Jerusalem, built by Solomon. Meshorer notes, "The Egyptianizing cornice, the columns widening in the middle and the uraei on the upper beams chow the influence of the Egyptian architecture. Perhaps this unusual shrine is the 'serifa in Ashqelon' mentioned in the Talmud (Aboda Zara 11b) as one of the five permanent idolatrous temples in the Land of Israel."
JD92801. Bronze AE 28, RPC Online IV 6373 (5 spec.); Meshorer City Coins p. 27, 50; SNG ANS 722; Sofaer pl. 143, 143; BMC Palestine p. 129, 191; Rosenberger I p. 57, 169, Fair, weight 17.232 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, Ascalon mint, Year 254 = 150 - 151 AD; obverse ANTWNINOC CEBACTOC, laureate head right; reverse ACK-AΛW, complex facade of the Temple of Phanebal depicting four doorways, one inside the other, ∆NC (year 254) in exergue; zero sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; extremely rare; $100.00 SALE |PRICE| $90.00 ON RESERVE


Apameia, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria, 10 - 9 B.C.

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Apamea is believed to be the Biblical city Shepham (Num. xxxiv. 11). Rome received Apamea with the Pergamene Kingdom in 133 B.C., but sold it to Mithridates V of Pontus, who held it till 120 BC. After the Mithridatic Wars it became a great center for trade, largely carried on by resident Italians and Jews. Pompey razed the fortress and annexed the city to Rome in 64 B.C. Apamea is mentioned in the Talmud (Ber. 62a, Niddah, 30b and Yeb. 115b). By order of Flaccus, nearly 45 kilograms of gold, intended by Jews for the Temple in Jerusalem was confiscated in Apamea in 62 B.C. In the revolt of Syria under Q. Caecilius Bassus, it held out against Julius Caesar for three years until the arrival of Cassius in 46 B.C.Great Colonnade at Apamea

RY88994. Bronze AE 21, BMC Galatia p. 234, 11; SNG Cop 300; AMC I 1470; RPC I 4354 (4 spec.); HGC 9 -; SNG Mn -; Lindgren -; Hunter -, F, dark green patina, light porosity, light earthen deposits, light scratches, edge split, weight 6.362 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, Syria, Apameia (Qalaat al-Madiq, Syria) mint, 10 - 9 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wreathed in ivy; reverse cornucopia overflowing with fruits and grains, ΓT (year 303) inner left, AΠAMEΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ − KAI AΣYΛOY in three downward lines (first two on left, last on right), M-A flanking tip of cornucopia; ex Guy Clark's Ancient Coins And Antiquities; rare; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Ascalon, Philistia

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Askalon lies on the shore of the Mediterranean, ten miles north of Gaza and about 40 miles south of Joppa. Herod the Great ruled all of Palestine, except Askalon, which remained a free city. Today, a national park at Ashqelon, Israel includes ruins of Canaanite, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader walls and buildings.
RP91417. Bronze AE 22, RPC II 2209, BMC Palestine 117, Sofaer 78, SNG Cop 34, SNG Righetti 2458, Lindgren 2455, Rosenberger I 110, Fine/Fair, interesting portrait, porous, encrustations, weight 13.787 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 0o, Askalon (Ashqelon, Israel) mint, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ, laureate head right; reverse AΣKAΛΩ, Tyche standing left on prow, holding standard and aphlaston, altar left, dove standing left over ∆ΠP (year 184) in right field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $80.00 SALE |PRICE| $72.00


Antoninus Pius, August 138 - 7 March 161 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis

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Philadelphia, Decapolis is today Amman, the capital and largest city of Jordan. One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, in the Hebrew Bible, it is called Rabbat Ammon. Ptolemy II Philadelphus of Egypt, renamed it Philadelphia. The city became part of the Nabataean Kingdom until 106 A.D. when it came under Roman rule and joined the Decapolis.
RP89400. Bronze AE 27, RPC IV online T6636 (9 spec.); Spijkerman 17; SNG ANS 1387; BMC Arabia, p. 39, 9 & pl. VI, 7; Rosenberger 18; Sofaer pl. 160, 20, gF, attractive style, holed, bumps, scratches, obverse off center, weight 6.863 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, die axis 180o, Philadelphia (Amman, Jordan) mint, c. 139 - 150 A.D.; obverse AYT KAICAP ANTWNEINOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind, before him a small bust of Athena left wearing a crested Corinthian helmet; reverse ΦIΛA∆EΛΦEWN KOIΛ CYPIAC (of the Philadelphians in Coele-Syria), bare-headed beardless bust of Herakles right (with the features of Marcus Aurelius), lion skin over left shoulder; scarce; $55.00 SALE |PRICE| $49.50


Judean Kingdom, Herod Agrippa I, 37 - 44 A.D.

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Agrippa was son of Aristobulus and Bernice, a grandson of Herod the Great. He spent his boyhood at the imperial court in Rome. His friend Caligula bestowed former territories of Philip and Herod Antipas. Claudius bestowed Judaea. He had James, the brother of John, executed (Acts 12:1-2) and imprisoned Peter (Acts 12:3-5).
JD93859. Bronze prutah, Hendin 1244, Meshorer TJC 120, RPC I 4981, SNG ANS 252, Sofaer 153, aF, off center and uneven strike, corrosion, weight 2.050 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, 41 - 42 A.D.; obverse AΓPIΠA BACIΛEWC (King Agrippa), umbrella-like canopy with fringes; reverse three heads of barley between two leaves, flanked by L - ς (year 6); $16.00 SALE |PRICE| $14.40







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 28, 2020.
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Biblical City Coins