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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Gods, Non-Olympian ▸ KoreView Options:  |  |  |   

Persephone (Kore)

Persephone, also called Kore, is the daughter of Zeus and the harvest goddess Demeter, and queen of the underworld; she was abducted by Hades, the king of the underworld.


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a citys status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77248. Bronze AE 28, Franke-Nolle, type VI, 857 (Vs.C/Rs.18); cf. SNGvA 3668; SNG Tubingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, VF, tight flan, obscure countermark on obverse, weight 9.924 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 180o, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY K - ΠOY ΛIK OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, NEOKOPΩN downward in right field, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $300.00 (267.00)


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, c. 275 - 215 B.C.

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Hieron II was tyrant and then king of Syracuse, c. 270 - 215 B.C. His rule brought 50 years of peace and prosperity. Syracuse became one of the most renowned capitals of antiquity. He enlarged the theater and built an immense altar. The literary figure Theocritus and the philosopher Archimedes lived under his rule. After struggling against the Mamertini, he eventually allied with Rome.
GI90439. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 352, 192 R1 19; BMC Sicily p. 219, 627; SNG ANS 586 (Agathokles); SNG Munchen 1235 (Agathokles); SNG Cop 867 corr.; HGC 2 1469, gVF, well centered and struck, dark green patina, light corrosion, light cleaning scratches, weight 5.881 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 135o, Syracuse mint, c. 275 - 269 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of Kore-Persephone left, wearing earrings and necklace, hair rolled and bound with barley wreath; reverse bull butting left, club over T (magistrate initial) above, IE (magistrate initials) in exergue; $190.00 (169.10)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Sardis

Click for a larger photo
This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Sardis. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a citys status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77255. Bronze AE 30, cf. Franke-Nolle, type VI, 848 ff. var. (Vs.C/Rs.-, unlisted reverse die); SNGvA 3668; SNG Tubingen 4054; Lindgren III 596, aF, obverse rough, weight 10.243 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 180o, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AY K - ΠOY ΛIK OYAΛEPAN/OC, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front, round countermark on face; reverse IEPAΠOΛE/ITΩN - KE - CAP∆IANΩN NEWK/OPΩN, Apollo on left, standing right, plectrum in right hand, kithara in left hand; cult statue of Kore facing, wearing kalathos and veil, OMONOYA in exergue; very rare; $190.00 (169.10)


Kyzikos, Mysia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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In Megalopolis, Arkadia, there was a sanctuary of Kore the Maid. "The image is of stone, about eight feet high; ribbons cover the pedestal all over. Women may enter this sanctuary at all times, but men enter it only once every year." -- Pausanias, Description of Greece 8.31.8
GB85164. Bronze AE 19, cf. SNG BnF 452 ff.; SNG Cop 68 ff.; SNGvA 1235 f.; SNG Tub 2256 ff.; BMC Mysia p. 39, 147; Lindgren I 220 (none with this monogram or countermark), aVF, c/m: VF; well centered on a broad flan, flattened on reverse opposite countermark, weight 5.749 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Kyzikos (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.; obverse bust of Kore Soteira (the savior maiden) right, wreathed with grain; countermark: griffin head right in oval punch; reverse KY/ZI in two lines, divided by ΠAT monogram at center, all inside oak wreath, within a shallow round incuse; apparently unpublished and both the monogram and countermark are extremely rare - we were unable to find specimens with either this monogram or this countermark in our many references or online; $140.00 (124.60)


Kyzikos, Mysia, c. 200 - 27 B.C.

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Cyzicus was one of the great cities of the ancient world. During the Peloponnesian War (431-404 B.C.) Cyzicus was subject to the Athenians and Lacedaemonians alternately. In the naval Battle of Cyzicus in 410, an Athenian fleet completely destroyed a Spartan fleet. At the peace of Antalcidas in 387, like the other Greek cities in Asia, it was made over to Persia. Alexander the Great captured it from the Persians in 334 B.C.
GB72168. Bronze AE 28, SNGvA 7355 (with same countermark); SNG BnF 505 (also with same c/m); SNG Cop 84; BMC Mysia p. 40, 167, VF, nice style, well centered, nice green patina, bevelled obv edge, weight 12.530 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 90o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 200 - 27 B.C.; obverse head of Kore Soteira right, wearing grain wreath; countermark: eagle standing right, wings open in a 7.5mm round punch; reverse tripod with three loop handles, KYZI/KHNWN from upper right, in two flanking downward lines, branch right above, torch left below, monogram outer right, monogram outer left; $120.00 (106.80)


Thurium (Thurioi), Lucania, Italy, 280 - 213 B.C.

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Beautiful Persephone lived a peaceful life far away from the other deities, a goddess within Nature herself before the days of planting seeds and nurturing plants. She was innocently picking flowers when Hades, god of the Underworld, burst through a cleft in the earth and abducted her. While Demeter searched desperately for her daughter she neglected the earth and caused nothing to grow. Zeus, pressed by the cries of hungry people, determined to force Hades to return Persephone. However, Hades had tricked Persephone into eating pomegranate seeds, and because anyone who consumed food or drink in the Underworld was doomed to spend eternity there, she is forced return to the underworld for a period each year. Explaining the seasons, when Demeter and her daughter are reunited, the Earth flourishes with vegetation and color, but for the months each year when Persephone returns to the underworld, the earth becomes barren.
GI84868. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 1513, HN Italy 1932, SNG ANS -, SNG Munchen -, BMC Italy -, VF, centered on a tight flan, encrustation, corrosion, weight 3.567 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, Thourioi mint, 280 - 213 B.C.; obverse ΘOYPIA, head of Kore Persephone (or Demeter) left, wreathed in grain; reverse bull butting left, IΣTI above, fish left in exergue; ex Certified Coin Exchange; rare; $90.00 (80.10)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathocles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI83555. Bronze AE 17, Calciati II p. 233, 104; SNG Cop 761; SNG ANS 610; SNG Munchen 1245; HGC 2 1989; SNG Tub -; SNG Morcom -, VF, nice style, dark green patina, pitting, weight 3.57 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 317 - 310 B.C.; obverse SYRAKOSIWN, head of Kore-Persephone left, wearing earring and necklace, hair rolled and wreathed with barley, vertical astragalus (control symbol) behind neck; reverse bull butting left, ax (control symbol) above, ΣΩ (magistrate initials) in exergue; $70.00 (62.30)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathocles, 317 - 289 B.C.

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In 310 B.C., Agathokles, tyrant of Syracuse, defeated and besieged by Carthage, took the desperate resolve of breaking through the blockade and attacking the enemy in Africa. After several victories he was completely defeated in 306 B.C. and fled secretly back to Sicily. After concluding peace, Agathocles styled himself king of Sicily, and established rule over the Greek cities of the island.
SH69733. Bronze AE 16, Calciati II p. 239, 110; SNG Cop 762; SNG Munchen 1245 (lion head), gF, superb style, weight 3.104 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, c. 317 - 310 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Persephone left wearing earring and necklace, wreathed in barley, uncertain control symbol behind neck; reverse bull butting left, E/Λ monogram (magistrate) above, ΣYPAKOΣIΩN in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; $65.00 (57.85)


Syracuse, Sicily, Agathokles, 317 - 310 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
With an army of mercenaries, through deceit, and after banishing or murdering some 10,000 citizens, Agathocles made himself master of Syracuse and later most of Sicily. Machiavelli wrote of him, "It cannot be called prowess to kill fellow-citizens, to betray friends, to be treacherous, pitiless, and irreligious" and cited him as an example of "those who by their crimes come to be princes." According to the historian Justin, very early in life Agathocles parlayed his remarkable beauty into a career as a prostitute, first for men, and later, after puberty, for women, and then made a living by robbery before becoming a soldier and marrying a rich widow.
GI75173. Bronze hemilitron, Calciati II p. 217, 96 Ds50 R15/5 (same dies); SNG Cop 755; BMC Sicily p. 194, 361; SNG Munchen 1211; SNG ANS 564 corr. (AI); HGC 2 1444 (S), VF, well centered and struck, nice style, corrosion, weight 9.778 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, Syracuse mint, 317 - 310 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣIΩN, head of Kore left, wreathed with grain, long flaming torch behind; reverse bull butting left, dolphin left above and below, AΓ (magistrate initials) above upper dolphin; $60.00 (53.40)


Syracuse, Sicily, Hieron II, c. 275 - 215 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Hieron II was tyrant and then king of Syracuse, c. 270 to 215 B.C. His rule brought 50 years of peace and prosperity, and Syracuse became one of the most renowned capitals of antiquity. He enlarged the theater and built an immense altar. The literary figure Theocritus and the philosopher Archimedes lived under his rule. After struggling against the Mamertini, he eventually allied with Rome.
GB67659. Bronze 1/8 chalkon, Calciati II p. 404, 199 R1 6; SNG Cop 868; SNG ANS 600; HGC 2, 1497 (R1, c. 275 - 269/265 B.C.), aVF, nice patina, weight 4.163 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 90o, Syracuse mint, 275 - 265 B.C.(?); obverse head of Kore left, hair rolled and bound with barley wreath, wearing earrings and necklace, no inscription(?), no control symbol; reverse bull butting left, club over AP monogram above, IE in exergue; $55.00 (48.95)




  



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Persephone (Kore)