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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ CologneView Options:  |  |  | 

Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany)

Colonia Agrippinensis established a mint under Postumous and struck for the subsequent Romano-Gallic usurpers.


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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The Rhine and the Danube formed most of the northern inland frontier of the Roman Empire.
RA72656. Billon antoninianus, Cunetio 2371, RSC IV 355b, Schulzki AGK 88c, RIC V-2 87, SRCV III 10991, Elmer 123, Hunter IV - (p. lxxxviii), gVF, reverse scratches, weight 3.812 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 1st emission, 2nd phase, 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS PROVINCIARVM (health of the provinces), river-god Rhenus (Rhine) reclining left, horned, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, resting right forearm on prow of a boat, reed cradled in left hand and arm, left elbow resting on urn behind; $105.00 (92.40)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Deusoniensis probably refers to modern Deutz, on the Rhine across from Cologne. Apparently, Hercules was worshiped there and it has been suggested that Postumus was born in the town. From these relatively obscure provincial origins, Postumus would have risen through the ranks of the army until he held command of the Roman forces "among the Celts." What his precise title was is not definitely known, though he may have been promoted by Valerian to imperial legate of Lower Germany. Postumus was evidently in favor at Valerian's court, and may even have been granted an honorary consulship.
RS64647. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 91a, RIC V-2 64, Mairat 13, Schulzki AGK 25, Elmer 124, Hunter IV 14, SRCV III 10944, aVF, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.271 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse HERC DEVSONIENSI (to Hercules of Deuson), Hercules standing slightly right, head right, nude, resting right hand on grounded club behind, bow in left hand, Nemean lion skin draped over his left arm; $70.00 (61.60)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

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Oriens is Latin for "east." Literally, it means "rising" from orior, "rise." The use of the word for "rising" to refer to the east (where the sun rises) has analogs from many languages: compare the terms "Levant" (French levant "rising"), "Anatolia" (Greek anatole), "mizrahi" in Hebrew (from "zriha" meaning sunrise), "sharq" in Arabic, and others. The Chinese pictograph for east is based on the sun rising behind a tree and "The Land of the Rising Sun" to refers to Japan. Also, many ancient temples, including the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, were built with their main entrances facing the East. To situate them in such a manner was to "orient" them in the proper direction. When something is facing the correct direction, it is said to have the proper "orientation."
RS87829. Silver antoninianus, Gbl MIR 868h, RIC V-1 12, RSC IV 143a, Hunter IV 53, SRCV III 9952, VF, well centered, attractive toning, soft strike, die wear, light bumps and marks, weight 2.996 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 257 - 259 A.D.; obverse VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front; reverse ORIENS AVGG (the rising sun of the two emperors), Sol advancing left, radiate, nude but for chlamys over shoulders, left arm and flying behind, raising right hand commanding the sun to rise, whip in left hand; $48.00 (42.24)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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The reverse may commemorate Gallienus' victory over the Alemanni at Milan in 259 A.D.
RA64633. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 872d, RIC V-1 J18 (Lugdunum), RSC IV 308 (Lugdunum), SRCV III 10225, VF, weight 3.239 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 258 - 259 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GERMANICVS MAX V, two captives seated back-to-back flanking the foot of a trophy of captured arms, their arms tied behind their backs; scarce; $40.00 (35.20)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS64659. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 39a, Schulzki AGK 14, RIC V-2 58, Hunter IV 49, Elmer 335, SRCV III 10936, gVF, well centered, flan a little ragged, weight 3.446 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 265 - 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing half left, long grounded caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; $36.00 (31.68) ON RESERVE


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Upon his acclimation, Postumus was recognized as emperor in Gaul (except perhaps for Narbonensis), the two Germanias, and Raetia. By 261, Britannia, Gallia Narbonensis and Hispania had also acknowledged him as emperor, possibly after an expedition to Britain in the winter of 260/261. He established his capital in northern Gaul, probably at Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium or Augusta Treverorum, and then proceeded to set up many of the traditional Roman legislative and executive structures. Apart from the position of emperor, he immediately assumed the office of consul alongside a colleague, Honoratianus. Like his imperial predecessors, he became the pontifex maximus of the state and assumed tribunician power each year. He is thought to have established a senate, perhaps on the basis of the Council of the Three Gauls or provincial councils, and a praetorian guard, one of whose officers was to become the future Gallic emperor Victorinus. Reflecting his power base, the chief members of Postumus administration appeared to have been of northern Gallic origin, and indeed, the entire administration soon became rapidly Gallicized. Both Victorinus and Tetricus, important members of the government, hailed from this region.
RB64656. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 261a (London); Hunter IV 3; RIC V-2 55 (London); Cunetio 2387 (73 spec.); Elmer 288; Schulzki AGK 61; SRCV III 10972, F, toned, die wear, edge cracks, porosity, weight 2.880 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 180o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, 262 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M TR P COS III P P, Postumus standing slightly left, wearing helmet and military attire, globe in right hand, spear vertical in left hand; $28.00 (24.64)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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In 267 A.D., Aureolus, who was charged with defending Italy, defeated Victorinus, the emperor in Gaul, and was proclaimed emperor by his troops. Aureolus then marched into Italy. In 268 A.D., Gallienus besieged Aureolus at Mediolanum (Milan). It ended in disaster for both men. Gallienus was killed by his own officers and Aureolus was murdered in turn by the Praetorian guard.
RB64674. Billon antoninianus, RSC IV 331a, RIC V-2 325, Hunter IV 79, Elmer 593, Mairat 143, Schulzki AGK 77, Cunetio 2444, SRCV III 10983, VF, uneven toning, irregular flan with edge splits, weight 3.318 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 225o, Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne, Germany) mint, c. 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right from the front; reverse SAECVLI FELICITAS (era of good fortune), Postumus standing right, bare-headed, wearing military attire, transverse spear in right hand, globe in extended left hand; $27.00 (23.76)







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Catalog current as of Monday, June 17, 2019.
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Colonia Agrippinensis