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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern Coins ▸ United KingdomView Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the United Kingdom

England, Edward I Longshanks, 1272 - 1307

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Elias notes, "In my experience for every 30 or 40 deniers with the EDWARD' FILI' legend only one with the EDWARDVS REX occurs."

Known as Edward Longshanks for his height of 6 ft. 2 in., and sometimes as the "Hammer of the Scots." Edward was ruthless in pursuing his aims and crushing those who opposed him. He conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeding in doing the same to Scotland.
UK86321. Silver denier au lion, Elias 15 (RR), SCBC-SII 8016, Duplessy 1039, Poey d'Avant 2790, aVF, toned, scratches, earthen deposits, small edge crack, weight 0.736 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 180o, Aquitaine mint, 1272 - 1307; obverse + EDWARDVS REX (King Edward, S on its side), lion passant left within inner circle; reverse + DVX AqVITANIE (Duke of Aquitaine), cross pattée within inner circle; very rare; $454.00 (€385.90) ON RESERVE


Anglo-Gallic, Edward III, 1372 - 1377

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This type and similar billon Anglo-Gallic coins looked silver when issued, but after some use turned black, hence their nickname, "black money." They were usually hastily and poorly struck, heavily circulated and worn, and seldom hoarded. Surviving examples are now rare and mostly low grade.
WO86745. Billon denier au leopard, Elias 95 (RR), Duplessy Féodales 1095A, SCBC-SII 8090, Poey d'Avant 2793 (Edward I), Boudeau -, aVF, well centered on a tight flan, uneven strike with parts of legend weak, areas of light corrosion, weight 0.683 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, 2nd type; obverse + EDVARDVS : REX (King Edward), leopard passant left above AnGL' between lines, rosette below, all within inner circle, double pellet stops; reverse + DVX : AQITAnIE (Duke of Aquitaine), cross pattée, within inner circle, double pellet stops; very rare; $250.00 (€212.50)
 


Anglo-Gallic, Richard I the Lionhearted, Count of Poitou and King of England 1189 - 1199

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The only coins of Richard struck in his own name are those of his French possessions; English issues attributed to Richard are all in the name and types of his father, Henry II.

Richard I is known as Richard Coeur de Lion or Richard the Lionhearted for his bravery in battle. He was born and spent his childhood in England. By the age of 16, Richard had command of his own army and put down rebellions against his father in Poitou. As king, he was off on Crusade, in captivity, or defending his lands in France, spending as little as 6 months of his 10-year reign in England. He spoke French and Occitan, but never learned English. Rather than regarding his kingdom as a responsibility requiring his presence as ruler, it seems he saw it primarily as a source of revenue to support his armies. As the leader of the Third Crusade after the departure of Philip II of France, he won considerable victories against Saladin, but did not retake Jerusalem. He was seen as a pious hero by his subjects and is one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France. Robin Hood lived in Sherwood Forest during Richard's reign.
UK86379. Silver denier, Elias 8b (S), Duplessy Feodales 926, Poey d'Avant 2536, SCBC-SII 8008 var. (no annulet), VF, toned, clashed dies, weight 0.998 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 270o, Melle (Deux-Sèvres) mint, 1189 - 1199; obverse + RICARDVS REX (King Richard), cross pattée within inner dot border, annulet in third (lower left) quarter; reverse PIC/TAVIE/NSIS ([County of] Poitou) in three lines across field; scarce; $180.00 (€153.00)
 


Anglo-Gallic, Richard I the Lionhearted, Count of Poitou and King of England 1189 - 1199

Click for a larger photo
The only coins of Richard struck in his own name are those of his French possessions; English issues attributed to Richard are all in the name and types of his father, Henry II.

Richard I is known as Richard Coeur de Lion or Richard the Lionhearted for his bravery in battle. He was born and spent his childhood in England. By the age of 16, Richard had command of his own army and put down rebellions against his father in Poitou. As king, he was off on Crusade, in captivity, or defending his lands in France, spending as little as 6 months of his 10-year reign in England. He spoke French and Occitan, but never learned English. Rather than regarding his kingdom as a responsibility requiring his presence as ruler, it seems he saw it primarily as a source of revenue to support his armies. As the leader of the Third Crusade after the departure of Philip II of France, he won considerable victories against Saladin, but did not retake Jerusalem. He was seen as a pious hero by his subjects and is one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France. Robin Hood lived in Sherwood Forest during Richard's reign.
UK86376. Silver denier, Poey d'Avant 2528, Elias 8f (S), Duplessy Feodales 922, SCBC-SII 8008 var. (no pellet), F, strike a little soft, minor flan flaws, weight 1.118 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Melle (Deux-Sèvres) mint, 1189 - 1199; obverse + RICARDVS REX (King Richard), cross pattée within inner dot border; reverse PIC/TAVIE/NSIS ([County of] Poitou) in three lines across field, pellet above; scarce variant; $170.00 (€144.50)
 


Anglo-Gallic, Edward II, 1307 - 1326

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Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most efficient military powers in Europe. His reign saw vital developments in the evolution of the English parliament, the ravages of the Black Death and the beginning of the Hundred Years' War. He remained on the throne for 50 years.

The outer obverse legend abbreviates, "BENEDICTUM SIT NOMEN DOMINI NOSTRI," which means, "Blessed be the name of our Lord."
UK86325. Silver maille blanche Hibernie, Elias 32, Duplessy Féodales 1049, Poey d'Avant 2864, SCBC-SII 8026, aVF, toned, typical crowded flan, uneven strike, weight 1.644 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 270o, Aquitaine(?) mint, 1326; obverse ED' REX AnGLIE (Edward King of England) / + BnDICTV : SIT : nOmE : DnI : nRI (double annulet stops in outer legend, none in inner legend), short cross pattée; reverse + DnS : hIBERnIE (Lord of Ireland, double annulet stop), châtel tournois with two turreted towers, a gateway, and topped with a cross pattée, three pellets in a triangle below; all within tressure of arches containing twelve leaves; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues

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Standard catalogue of British coins by denomination. A second edition to the 2015 catalogue due to the quantity of commemorative issues released in 2015.
BK12931. Coins of England & the United Kingdom - Decimal Issues, Spink, 2016, 173 pages, color illustrated, paperback, new; $6.00 (€5.10)
 







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REFERENCES

Borden D. & I. Brown. "The Milled Coinage of Elizabeth I" in BNJ vol 53. (1983). pp. 108 - 132.
Brown, I., C. Comber, & W. Wilkinson. The Hammered Silver Coins Produced at the Tower Mint During the Reign of Elizabeth I. (Llanfyllin, 2012).
Bull, M. English Silver Coinage Since 1649. (London, 2015).
Davies, P. British Silver Coins Since 1816. (1982).
Elias, E. The Anglo-Gallic Coins. (Paris/London, 1984).
Everson, T. The Galata Guide to the Farthing Tokens of James I and Charles I: A History and Reclassification. (Llanfyllin, 2008).
Freeman, M. Bronze Coinage of Great Britain. (London, 1985).
Krause C. & Mishler, C. Standard Catalog of World Coins. (Iola, WI, 2010 - )
Lawrence, L. "The Coinage of Edward III from 1351" in NC 1926, 1929, 1932, 1933.
Marsh, M. The Gold Half Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2004).
Marsh, M. The Gold Sovereign. (Cambridge, 2002).
Mass, J. Mass Collection, English Short Cross Coins, 1180-1247. SCBI 56. (Oxford, 2001).
Montagu, H. The copper, tin and bronze coinage and patterns for coins of England, from the reign of Elizabeth to that of Her present Majesty. (London, 1893).
Nelson, P. The Coinage of William Wood, 1722-1733. (Brighton, 1903).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 1: Early Anglo-Saxon to Henry 111 c. A.D. 600-1272. (London, 1994).
North, J. English Hammered Coinage Vol 2: Edward 1 to Charles 11 1272-1662. (London, 1991).
North, J. & P. Preston-Morley. Brooker Collection, Coins of Charles I. SCBI 33. (London, 1984).
Peck, C. English Copper, Tin and Bronze Coins in the British Museum, 1558-1958. (London, 1964).
Spink. Coins of England & the United Kingdom, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (London, 2012).
Spink. Coins of Scotland, Ireland and the Islands (Jersey, Guernsey, Man and Lundy) Pre-Decimal Issues, Standard Catalogue of British Coins. (Cambridge, 2003).
Wilson, A. & M. Rasmussen. English Pattern Trial and Proof Coins in Gold 1547-1968. (Cambridge, 2000).
Withers, P. & B. Small Change I - V Farthings and Halfpennies. (Llanfyllin, 2003 - 2005).
Withers, P. & B., & S. Ford. Anglo-Gallic Coins - Monnaies Anglo-Francaises. (Llanfyllin, 2015).
Woodhead, P. & D. Liddell. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume One, English Gold Coins and their Imitations, Henry III to Elizabeth I, 1257-1603. (London, 1996).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Two, English Gold Coins, 1603-20th Century. (London, 2002).
Woodhead, P. The Herbert Schneider Collection, Volume Three, Anglo-Gallic, Flemish and Brabantine Gold Coins, 1330 - 1794. (London, 2011).

Catalog current as of Thursday, May 24, 2018.
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UK Coins