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Coins and Antiquities Under $50

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Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI

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The eleventh volume, is dedicated to finds of Roman hoards from the early imperial period (with terminal dates up to AD 235) discovered between 1997 and 2001. The highlight of the volume is the Shapwick Villa (Somerset) hoard of over 9,000 denarii, the largest hoard of its kind from Britain to be fully published. It is complemented by an important essay on hoards of the Severan period from Britain by Richard Abdy and Roger Bland.
BK10551. Coin Hoards From Roman Britain Volume XI edited by Richard Abdy, Ian Leins, and Jonathan Williams, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication No. 36, 2002, 223 pages, 10 plates, new, shelf-worn; $35.00 (29.75)


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end could later be carved to a matching shape. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $24.00 (20.40)


Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins

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Published by the American Numismatic Society, this volume publishes the collection of Wheaton College in a format similar to SNG.
BK09881. Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins by J. David Bishop and R. Ross Holloway, hardback, 32 pages plus 32 plates; $9.00 (7.65)


Ptolemaic Kyrenaica, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), 246 - 116 B.C.

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Alexander the Great received tribute from the cities of Kyrenaica after he took Egypt. Kyrenaica was annexed by Ptolemy I Soter. It briefly gained independence under Magas of Cyrene, stepson of Ptolemy I, but was reabsorbed into the Ptolemaic empire after his death. It was separated from the main kingdom by Ptolemy VIII and given to his son Ptolemy Apion, who, dying without heirs in 96 B.C., bequeathed it to the Roman Republic.
GP65950. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 874 (Ptolemy II, 1 specimen), cf. SNG Cop 445 (Ptolemy III), Weiser 105 (Ptolemy V), Noeske 130 (Ptolemy III), SNG Milan 484 (uncertain date), VF, weight 0.881 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Kyrene mint, 246 - 116 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse head of Libya right, wearing tainia, cornucopia below chin; $70.00 (59.50)


Byzantine Empire, Manuel I Comnenus, 8 April 1143 - 24 September 1180 A.D.

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St. George is the Patron Saint of England. Traditionally, the sword with which St. George slew the dragon was called Ascalon, a name recalling the city of Ashkelon, Israel. During World War II, Winston Churchill named his personal aircraft Ascalon, after St. George's sword.
BZ45637. Bronze half tetarteron, DOC IV, part 1, 23; Hendy pl. 18, 3; Morrisson BnF 61/X/AE/05; Wroth BMC 78; Ratto 2158; SBCV 1980; Sommer 61.25, VF, nice green patina, flan cracks, weight 1.565 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Greek mint, 1152 - c. 1160 A.D.; obverse Θ / Γ/ε−ωP/ΓI/OC (or similar), bust of St. George facing, beardless, wearing nimbus, tunic, cuirass, and sagion, spear in right, shield in left; reverse MANYH ∆εCΠOT, Manuel, bust facing, wearing crown and loros, labarum in right, globus cruciger in left; $45.00 (38.25)


Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D.

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In 291, Diocletian signed peace treaties with the kingdoms of Aksum and Nubia.
RA51543. Billon antoninianus, Bastien pl. XXIII, 323a (same obverse die, 39 spec.); RIC V, part 2, 28; Cohen VI 153; Hunter IV 33 var. (bust), VF, weight 2.785 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 290 - 291 A.D.; obverse IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate and mantled bust left, holding eagle-tipped scepter; reverse IOVI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, victory in right, leaning on long scepter in left hand, eagle at feet left, A in exergue; ex Harlan J. Berk; $45.00 (38.25)


Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

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RIC lists this type as scarce, however, we believe it is rare.
RL56550. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VIII Rome 13 (S), LRBC I 588, Voetter 11, SRCV V 18566, Cohen VII 102, Hunter V -, aVF, green patina, some legend weak, weight 1.577 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Rome mint, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse D N FL CONSTANS AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIP (security of the Republic), Securitas standing facing, head right, long scepter in right, leaning with left elbow on column, R leaf T in exergue; rare; $45.00 (38.25)


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 37 B.C.

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The patron god of the Tarsos was Sandan and a large monument to Sandan existed at Tarsos until at least the 3rd century A.D. Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when, as depicted on this coin, an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre. It is now thought likely that the Lion of Saint Mark on the pillar in the Piazza San Marco in Venice was in origin a winged lion-griffin from a monument at Tarsus.
GB57039. Bronze AE 21, SNG Levante 950; SNG BnF 1307 ff. var. (controls); BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 108 ff. var. (same), gF, weight 6.897 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 37 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse TAPΣEΩN, Sandan standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, controls on left: AM, over two monograms, over Θ; $45.00 (38.25)


Kolophon, Ionia, c. 360 - 294 B.C.

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After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered.
GB59682. Bronze dichalkon, Milne Kolophon 112, Imhoof-Blumer KM p. 70, 5, BMC Ionia p. 38, 23 ff. var. (various magistrates), SNG Cop 149 ff. var. (same), aVF, weight 2.045 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 360 - 294 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of horse right, ΘPAΣYKΛHΣ (magistrate) left, KO below; $45.00 (38.25)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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The Romans, whose fondness for new gods increased with the influence of their foreign conquests, introduced the worship of Serapis within the walls of their city; not, however, without some opposition and resistance from the Senate. Through the influence of P. Victor an altar was erected to Serapis in the Circus Flaminii, and it quickly assumed the form of a superb temple which, after its Alexandrine prototype, was called the Serapeon. The principal Italian cities, never far behind Rome, soon imitated her example, and it was not long before the worship of Serapis was extended from Italy by the different colonies sent from that country into Asia Minor.
RP59690. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov II 3842 - 3843 var. (obv. legend), BMC Thrace p. 120, 27 var. (same), SNG Cop -, aVF, weight 9.782 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, obverse AVT K M ANT ΓOP∆IANOC AVΓ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Serapis standing half left, raising right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand; rare variety; $45.00 (38.25)




  



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Under $50