Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Under $50||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Constantine Era Bronze Coin in Plastic Holder, 307 - 364 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The coin in the photo is randomly selected example, not the actual coin you will receive.
SL35619. Bronze coin, Constantine and his family, in plastic holder, Fine or better, no grades on holders, one coin; $2.90 (2.55)


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 (17.60)


Salonina, Augusta 254 - c. September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
This type was struck during Salonina's lifetime, so the unusual reverse legend was not struck in memorial. There has been some fanciful speculation that "IN PACE," meaning "in peace," was a Christian phrase indicating the empress had converted to Christianity.
RB65809. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1377e, RIC V-1 S58, RSC IV 17, SRCV III 10626 var. (mint mark), Hunter IV S27 var. (obv. legend), aVF, slightly ragged flan, weight 3.539 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Mediolanum (Milan, Italy) mint, 266 - 268 A.D.; obverse SALONINA AVG, draped bust right, wearing stephane, hair in ridges and in plait looped below ear up the back of head, crescent behind shoulders; reverse AVG IN PACE, Salonina seated left, olive-branch downward in right hand, long transverse scepter in left hand, MS in exergue; $48.00 (42.24)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Iberian(?) Barbaric Imitative

Click for a larger photo
 
RB70583. Copper as, cf. RIC I 431, BMCRE 226, Cohen I 515, BnF I 687, SRCV I 1685 (official, Rome mint, 7 B.C.), F, interesting crude style, nice green patina, edge cracks, scratches, pits on reverses, weight 10.390 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 225o, Iberian(?) unofficial mint, obverse bare head right; reverse large S C; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. Emperors frequently made vows to Jupiter for protection. The Roman's believed as the king of the gods, Jupiter favored emperors and kings, those in positions of authority similar to his own.
RB76165. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 298a, Cohen V 111, Hunter III 134, SRCV III 8710, VF, nice green patina, excellent portrait, reverse double struck, flan cracks, incomplete cleaning, weight 20.980 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 241 - 243 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IOVI STATORI (to Jove who upholds), Jupiter standing facing, head right, naked, long scepter vertical in right hand, thunderbolt in left hand at side, S - C divided across field; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck. Fortuna Redux brought one safely home, in this case the emperor. The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Syria and Egypt. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel (the wheel of fortune), entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. It appears, however, she kept her wheel. She just hid it under her seat.
RA89644. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 546g, RSC IV 279 (Mediolanum), RIC V-1 S484 (Mediolanum), SRCV III -, Hunter IV - (p. lxi), Choice aVF, near full silvering, full legends, centers a little weak, flan shape slightly irregular, weight 2.792 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, c. 262 - 263 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder on globe by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RA89646. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1640b, RSC IV 277, RIC V-1 S613, Hunter IV 203, SRCV III 10220, Choice VF, full borders centering, dark patina, traces of silvering, weight 3.619 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, VII C (= COS VII) in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
An interesting revival of the left shoulder draped bust, widely used during the 2nd century, but later abandoned (with the notable exception of Severus Alexander).
RA89648. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 348a, RSC IV 402, RIC V-1 S221, Hunter IV 12, SRCV III 10247, aVF, white metal, broad oval flan, mild porosity, tiny edge cracks, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 260 - 261 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder; reverse IOVI VLTORI, Jupiter standing facing, head right, nude, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, cloak blowing in the wind in left hand, S left; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Gallienus was the first Roman emperor to commission primarily cavalry units, the Comitatenses, that could be dispatched anywhere in the Empire in short order. He also forbade senators from becoming military commanders. These policies undermined senatorial power, as equestrian commanders rose to prominence. These reforms and the decline in senatorial influence not only helped Aurelian to salvage the Empire, but they also make Gallienus one of the emperors most responsible for the creation of the Dominate, along with Septimius Severus, Diocletian, and Constantine I.
RA89649. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 577a, RIC V-1 S160, RSC IV 38b, Hunter IV 54, SRCV III -, gVF, near full silvering, broad oval flan, clashed dies, slightly off center, weight 3.684 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Rome mint, 260 - 268 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse AETERNITAS AVG, Sol standing half-left, raising right commanding the sun to rise, globe in left hand, Γ left; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00


Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D., Ancient Counterfeits

Click for a larger photo
Many ancient plated counterfeits have an obverse and reverse that do not match. The dies were likely created using impressions of genuine coins. Two different coins had to be used because producing each die destroyed the coin used to create an impression. The forgers were apparently unconcerned about mismatched types. The silver from the destroyed coins could then be used to make the silver foil for plating.
RS91042. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RIC II-1 720 for obv. (silver, official, Rome, Sep 90 - Sep 91); RIC II-1 789 for rev. (silver, official, Rome, Sep 95 - Sep 96), F, many platting breaks, weight 2.286 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, unofficial counterfeiter's mint, c. 95 - 99 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P X, laureate head right; reverse IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva standing left, helmeted and draped, thunderbolt in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, grounded shield at feet behind; $60.00 SALE |PRICE| $48.00




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Monday, November 18, 2019.
Page created in 8.391 seconds.
Under $50