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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Medieval & Modern CoinsView Options:  |  |  |   

Medieval and Modern Coins

France, Provincial, Duchy of Normandie, William the Conqueror, 1035 - 1087, In the Name of William Rufus(?)

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There are two varieties of this denier, one with RICAR above the pediment (Legros 336) and the other with two W's (Legros 337, Dumas and Legros list only one specimen, in the Brussels Coin Cabinet). These two types were struck in the reign of William the Conqueror, after 1070. The RICAR issue may have been struck in the name of his son Richard (1057- c. 1081), Duke of Bernay; and the W's may refer to his son William Rufus (1056 - 1100), King of the English.
ME79660. Silver denier, Dumas pl. XX, 12 (Brussels Coin Cabinet); Legros 337 (same, unique); Poey d'Avant –; Duplessy Féodales –; Roberts –; De Wit Collection –, VF, toned, weight 0.801 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rouen mint, c. 1070 - 1081; obverse + NORMANNA, cross pattée, pellets in each quarter, within linear inner border; reverse stylized cathedral facade, cross within arched doorway, two pellets above arch, two towers flanking (each a line topped with an annulet), pellet in triangular pediment, two W's (for William Rufus?) above the pediment; extremely rare; $480.00 (€427.20)


Normans, Kingdom of Sicily, William II, 1166 - 1189 A.D.

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Secluded and pleasure-loving, William II, the Good, seldom emerged from his palace life at Palermo. Yet his reign was marked by an ambitious foreign policy and vigorous diplomacy. Champion of the papacy and in secret league with the Lombard cities he was able to defy the common enemy, Frederick I Barbarossa.
SH71138. Billon quarter tercenario, MEC Italy III 423, Biaggi 1777 (R), MIR Sicily 442 (R2), Spahr 115, VF, frosty surfaces, weight 0.412 g, maximum diameter 12.0 mm, die axis 0o, Palermo mint, second silver coinage; obverse Kufic Arabic legend: duriba bi-madinat Siquilliyyah hama-ha Allah (struck at Palermo, may God protect her), small cross pommée within a linear circle; reverse qVART/A TERCE/NARII• in three lines within linear circle border; very rare; $450.00 (€400.50)


Crusaders, Armenian Cilicia, Roupen I, 1080 - 1095 A.D.

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In 1080, Roupen I declared Cilicia independent from the Byzantine Empire, founding the Roupenian dynasty, which ruled Cilician Armenia until 1219. He led bold and successful military campaigns against the Byzantines, including capturing the fortress of Pardzerpert (Andirin, Turkey today), which became a stronghold of the new kingdom.
SH66597. Bronze Pogh, Bedoukian 1 var. (no crescent), Nercessian 245 var. (same), aVF, weight 1.853 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 315o, obverse Armenian legend: Raiben (Roupen), cross pattée within circle, pellet in each quarter; reverse Armenian legend: Tsara ay (Servant of God), cross pattée within circle, crescent in one quarter; very rare; $360.00 (€320.40)


France, Provincial, Duchy of Normandie, William the Conqueror, 1035 - 1087

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William I (c. 1028 - 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. The descendant of Viking raiders, he had been Duke of Normandy since 1035. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.
ME77512. Silver denier, Roberts 4815; Dumas pl. XIX, 18; Legros 333; Poey-dAvant 132, VF, usual crude dies, tight flan, and uneven strike, weight 0.921 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, Rouen mint, 1035 - 1087; obverse + ROTOMAGVS, cross pattée, pellets in each quarter, within linear inner border; reverse cross with pellet within annulet at the end of each arm, a small cross in a circle in the center; in each quarter: a triangular temple pediment with pellet in center; very rare; $280.00 (€249.20)


Normans, Southern Italy, Anonymous, Dukes of Apulia or Counts of Sicily & Calabria, c. 1060 - 1080 A.D.

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This coin is certainly imitative, as it weighs less then 1/3 the weight of the even the lightest official Class B Byzantine anonymous follis Forum has handled. Attribution to the Normans in Italy is based on the reputed find location and some similarity to other Byzantine imitatives issued by the Normans in Southern Italy and Sicily.
ME73353. Bronze follaro, apparently unpublished, imitative of Class B Byzantine anonymous follis (SBCV 1823, Constantinople, 1028 - 1041); MEC Italy III -, MIR -, et al. -, F, weight 2.163 g, maximum diameter 23.3 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Italian mint, c. 1060 - 1080 A.D.; obverse facing bust of Christ, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, holding book of Gospels; reverse IS - XS / bAS-ILE / bAS-ILE (Jesus Christ King of Kings, mostly off flan), Cross on three steps, dividing legend; from a California collector; $240.00 (€213.60)


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Dium, Coele Syria

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Rosenberger describes the altar as a "figure (?) with plumes headdress, on pedestal." The Rosenberger coin is worn and the "figure" is a bit taller and thinner than our altar, but the coin does seem to be this same type.

The site of ancient Dium (Dion, Decapolis) has not been conclusively identified. The four leading candidates for Dium are Tell al-Husn and Edun, both near Irbid, in north Jordan, Kufr Abil, near Pella, and Tell al-Ash'ari, near the Syrian border town of Der'a.
RY77849. Bronze AE 22, Rosenberger 9 corr., Spijkerman 10 var. (legends), Sofaer 10 var. (legends), Meshorer -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Galatia -, aF, earthen deposit highlighting, tight flan, corrosion, weight 7.701 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 180o, Dium mint, 219 - 220 A.D.; obverse AV KAI MAV ANTWNINO, laureate and draped or cuirassed youthful bust right, from the front; reverse hexastyle temple, flaming altar within under central arch, ΓΠ-C (year 283) divided above roof, ∆IHNWN in exergue; very rare; $225.00 (€200.25)


Crusaders, County of Tripoli, Raymond II, 1137-1152 A.D.

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Raymond II considered the Syrian Christians of Tripoli responsible for treachery which led to his father's defeat and death in a battle with Damascus. After the battle, he took many of them prisoner, and as William of Tyre wrote, "he visited upon them diverse tortures in the presence of the people, and, in just proportion to the enormity of the crime which they had committed, he caused them to suffer death in its most cruel forms." This act was praised by the Latin Christians as "the first proofs of valor which were given by the young count, whereby he won the affection of all his people and universal approval." In 1142 Raymond donated Krak des Chevaliers, an enormous fortress on the road from Homs to the Mediterranean, as well as other smaller castles, to the Knights Hospitallers. The Hospitallers were virtually independent in the county, for which they protected Tripoli's borders from frequent raids by the forces of Damascus and Zanki, the Turkish atabeg of Mosul and Aleppo.
ME76426. Bronze fraction, Sabine type 1, 194 - 199; Malloy Crusaders 5; Metcalf Crusaders 513; Schlumberger VI 5, VF, octagonal flan, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 1.017 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, Tripoli mint, c. 1145 - 1149; obverse + RAIMVNDVS (cross at the bottom, legend starts at 7:00, ), eight pointed star, pellet between each ray, shallow crescent with horns up below, all within inner border; reverse cross pattée with three annulets at the end of each arm, crossed by smaller cross with crescent horns inward pellet and annulet at the end of each arm; very rare; $200.00 (€178.00)


Crusaders, County of Tripoli, Bohemond V, 1233 - 1252

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Bohemond V was Prince of Antioch and Count of Tripoli from 1233 to his death in January 1252. Bohemond V was the son of Bohemund IV of Antioch and Plaisance of Gibelet. Like his father before him, Bohemond had a notorious dislike for the Knights Hospitaller and the neighboring Kingdom of Armenia, preferring an alliance with the Knights Templar. Peace with Armenia was assured only shortly before his death, with the mediation of Louis IX of France.
ME76428. Billon denier, Sabine type 5, 75 - 127; Malloy Crusaders 19; Metcalf 547 - 550; Schlumberger IV 17, VF, tight flan, weight 0.609 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 315o, Tripoli mint, 1233 - 1251; obverse + BAMVND' COMS, cross pattée, three pellets in upper right quarter, beaded borders; reverse + CIVITAS TRIPOL, eight pointed star, annulets between the rays, beaded borders; scarce; $200.00 (€178.00)


Normans, Kingdom of Sicily, Roger II, 1105 - 1154 A.D.

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Roger II was King of Sicily, son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon. He began his rule as Count of Sicily in 1105, became Duke of Apulia and Calabria in 1127, and then King of Sicily in 1130. Roger II is remembered for having united all of the Norman conquests in Italy under one strong central government. He was also the grandfather of Frederick II.
ME70465. Bronze follaro, MIR 10 135 (R2), MEC Italy III 227, F, both sides off-center, weight 1.120 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Messina mint, 1150 - 1151 A.D.; obverse MP − ΘY (Greek abbreviation: Mother of God), half-length bust of the Virgin Orans facing; reverse Arabic inscription arranged as a cross: umila five hundred forty five (struck in 545 AH), four dots arranged in a square in each quarter; very rare; $180.00 (€160.20)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285 A.D.

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Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME73117. Billon denaro, MIR 10 354 (R4), Biaggi 1297 (NC), MEC Italy III -, F, green patina, legends weak and partially off flan, weight 0.500 g, maximum diameter 15.8 mm, die axis 0o, Brindisi mint, 1266 - 1278 A.D.; obverse + AROL•DEI•GRACIA, K with cross pattée to right; reverse + REX SICILIE, cross pattée, pellet in each quarter; very rare; $180.00 (€160.20)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, February 23, 2017.
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Medieval and Modern