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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Constantinian EraView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman coins of the Constantinian Era

Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

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The labarum, was a type of Roman cavalry standard, a vexillum with a military ensign marked with the Christogram (Greek monogram of Christ). It was an object of religious veneration amongst the soldiers, who paid it divine honors.
RL87195. Bronze double maiorina, RIC VIII Thessalonica 236 (R), SRCV V 19213, Cohen VIII 23, LRBC II 1700 var. (rosette diademed), Hunter V -, Choice VF, green patina, well centered, edge crack, weight 9.163 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 150o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, 27 Jun 363 - 17 Feb 364 A.D.; obverse D N IOVIANVS P F P P AVG (Our lord Jovianus, dutiful, fortunate, father of the coutntry, emperor), pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA ROMANORVM (to Roman victory), Jovian standing facing, head right, labarum (Chi-Rho Christogram Standard) in right hand, Victory on globe in left hand offering him and Chi-Rho standard, TESA in exergue; rare with pearl diadem; $220.00 (187.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL90728. Billon maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 284 (S), LRBC II 1171, Voetter 48, SRCV V 18903, Cohen VII 3, gVF, oval flan, encrustation, flan split, weight 5.040 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star in front; reverse CONCORDIA MILITVM (harmony with the soldiers), Constantius standing half-left, in military dress, labarum (Chi-Rho standard) in each hand, A left, star above, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; $180.00 (153.00)


Lot of 5 Choice gVF+ Bronze Coins - Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and his Sons, 307 - 337 A.D.

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Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity after the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. Before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. After placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. He also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.
LT87360. Bronze Lot, 5 coins of Constantine and his sons, 17.4 - 18.7 mm, all Choice gVF+ , with attractive highlighting "desert" patinas, struck under Constantine, 307 - 337 A.D.; no specific identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $180.00 (153.00)


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL82770. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 3 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 543, LRBC I 66, SRCV IV 16445, Cohen VII 21, EF, sharp detail, slightly off center on a tight flan, clashed reverse die, weight 2.398 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRS in exergue; $160.00 (136.00)


Lot of 10 VF Bronze Coins - Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and his Sons, 307 - 337 A.D.

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Flavius Valerius Constantinus, Constantine the Great, was the son of Helena and the First Tetrarchic ruler Constantius I. Constantine is most famous for his conversion to Christianity after the battle of the Milvian Bridge where he defeated emperor Maxentius. Before the battle, he saw the words "In Hoc Signo Victor Eris" (By this sign you shall conquer) emblazoned on the sun around the Chi Rho, the symbol of Christianity. After placing this Christogram on the shields of his army, he defeated his opponent and thus ruled the empire through divine providence. He also shifted the capital of the empire to Constantinople, establishing the foundation for an Empire that would last another 1000 years. He died in 337 and his sons divided the Roman territories.
LT87364. Bronze Lot, 10 coins of Constantine and his sons, 16.9 - 19.3 mm, VF, nice coins with attractive earthen highlighting desert patinas, struck under Constantine, 307 - 337 A.D.; no specific identification, no tags or flips, the lot is the actual coins in the photograph; $150.00 (127.50)


Magnentius, 18 January 350 - 10 August 353 A.D.

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Strabo wrote, "The Romans possess Lugdunum, founded below a ridge at the confluence of the Arar and the Rhone. It is the most populous of all the other cities except Narbo; for it is a center of commerce, and the Roman emperors strike their silver and gold coinage there." (4.3.2). Dates of operation: 15 B.C. - c. 90 A.D., 195 - 196, and c. 254 - 423. Mintmarks: LG, LVG
RT85637. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Lyons 126, LRBC II 221, Bastien Lyon 174, SRCV V 18820, Hunter V 43 var. (pellet above SV), EF, dark toned silvered surfaces, well centered on a tight flan, die wear, tiny edge chip, slightest porosity, weight 5.201 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 18 Jan 350 - 351 A.D.; obverse D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind; reverse VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE (victories of our lords, Emperor and Caesar), two Victories holding wreath containing VOT V MVLT X, SV below, RPLG in exergue; $140.00 (119.00)


Crispus, Caesar, 1 March 317 - 326 A.D.

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On 7 March 321, Constantine issued an edict proclaiming Dies Solis Invicti (Sunday) as the day of rest; trade was forbidden but agriculture was allowed.
RL77188. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 133, Hunter V 25, SRCV IV 16734, Bastien XIII 102, Cohen VII 6, Choice EF, dark toning on silvering, weight 3.120 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX in three lines, surmounted by globe, three stars above, C left, R right, PLG crescent in exergue; $125.00 (106.25)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
SH63721. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17155, Cohen VII 23, gVF, well centered on a tight flan, nice green patina, weight 2.868 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 322 - 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D., Issued by Vetranio

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In 312 A.D., Constantine dreamed he saw a Christogram in the sky and heard the words IN HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, meaning in Latin "In this sign, you will be the victor." He ordered the sign of Christ on his legions standards and shields. He won a great victory and later became the first Christian Roman Emperor.
RL73908. Billon heavy maiorina, RIC VIII Siscia 286 (S), LRBC II 1173, Voetter 51, SRCV V 18203, VF, well centered and struck, nice green patina, spots of corrosion on the obverse, small edge cracks, weight 4.277 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, issued by Vetranio, 1 Mar - 25 Dec 350 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, A behind, star before; reverse HOC SIGNO VICTOR ERIS, Constantius standing facing head left, holding labarum (Chi Rho Christogram standard) and spear, Victory right crowning him, A left, ΓSIS in exergue; scarce; $120.00 (102.00)


Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

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Constantine II was about eight years old when this coin was minted. Here he is draped and cuirassed as a powerful child Caesar with the world in his hands!
RL12133. Billon centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 382 (R3) corr. (no cuirass), SRCV V 17157 var. (bust), Cohen VII 23, aEF, superb bust type, broad flan, slightly uneven strike, reverse legend weak, weight 3.018 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 315o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 323 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, mappa in left, head of Medusa on cuirass; reverse BEATA TRANQVILLITAS (blessed tranquility), altar inscribed VO/TIS / XX, surmounted by globe, three stars above, STR crescent in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)




  







Catalog current as of Sunday, October 21, 2018.
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Constantinian Era