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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Late EmpireView Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Late Roman Empire

Magnus Maximus, July 383 - 28 July 388 A.D.

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After the Roman troops in Britain, proclaimed general Magnus Maximus emperor, he invaded Gaul and drove Gratian before him until the latter was overrun and assassinated. After negotiations, Theodosius I recognized Magnus Maximus and his son, Flavius Victor, as emperors in Britannia and Gaul. Gratian's brother Valentinian II retained Italy, Pannonia, Hispania, and Africa. In 386 A.D., driven by reckless greed, Magnus Maximus invaded Italy, driving out Valentinian II, who fled to Theodosius I. Commanding an army of Goths, Huns and Alans, Theodosius marched west and defeated Magnus Maximus at the Battle of the Save. On 28 August 388, Magnus Maximus surrendered at Aquileia and was executed.
RS86382. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Trier 84b(1), RSC V 20a, Hunter V 6, SRCV V 20644, Cohen VIII 20 (10 fr.), EF, well centered, iridescent rose toning, some obverse die wear, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.136 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 384 - 28 Jul 388 A.D.; obverse D N MAG MA-XIMVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS ROMANORVM (courage of the Romans), Roma seated facing on throne, head left, left leg bare, globe in right hand, spear in left hand, TRPS in exergue; $380.00 (323.00)


Antioch, Seleucia Pieria, Syria, 51 - 50 B.C.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RP86398. Bronze tetrachalkon, McAlee 41 (Ex. Rare), RPC I 4214, Hoover Syrian 1371, BMC Galatia -, SNG Cop -, SNG Mnchen -, Choice VF, well centered, green patina, light scratches and marks, weight 7.523 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 51 - 50 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ANTIOXEΩN / THΣ in two downward lines on the right, MHTPOΠOΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus enthroned left, Nike offering wreath in his extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in his left hand, no control symbol, ΣI (year 16 of the Pompeian era) in exergue; extremely rare year; $250.00 (212.50)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and a general under Julian II. Some contemporary historians of Procopius claim that Julian II had meant for the general to succeed him instead of Jovian. Whether true or not, Jovian gained the throne and Procopius retired. After Jovian died, the next emperors, Valentinian and Valens, had Procopius arrested. Procopius escaped and, on 28 September 365, bribed two legions passing by Constantinople, proclaimed himself emperor, and took control of Thrace and Bithynia. In April 366, Valens defeated the troops of Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira in Phrygia, ending his revolt. Procopius fled the battlefield but was captured at Nacoleia and executed on 27 May 366.
RL84226. Bronze centenionalis, see CNG e-auction 268, lot 413 (no object left); cf. RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a), LRBC II 2081, SRCV V 19883, Cohen VIII 8 (all bust left), aVF, dark green patina with earthen deposits, tight flan, edge cracks, light scratches, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.544 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing slightly left, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet on left, CONSE in exergue; apparently unpublished, extremely rare with bust right; $125.00 (106.25)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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According to Zosimus, Julian gave Procopius an imperial robe, informing him of his intent to make him his successor. But Julian did not tell anyone of this intent and Jovian was acclaimed emperor. Procopius gave Jovian the robe. He told Jovian of Julian's intention but asked the new Emperor to allow him to retire to private life. Jovian accepted and Procopius and his family retired to Caesarea Mazaca.
RL79986. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2081, RIC IX 17a, Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, gVF, excellent portrait, nice green patina, edge chip, weight 2.661 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, object on ground to left, Christogram above right, CONSΓ in exergue; rare; $120.00 (102.00)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and general under Julian II. On 28 Sep 365, during the rule of Valentinian and Valens, he bribed two legions passing by Constantinople and proclaimed himself emperor. In April 366, Valens defeated Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira, ending his revolt. Procopius fled, but was later captured and executed.
RL74567. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2082, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a)6 (R2), Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, aVF, green patina, typical tight flan, light marks, scratches and corrosion, weight 3.116 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 345o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, CONSA in exergue; rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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In 380, Rome's enemies the Germans, Sarmatians and Huns were taken into Imperial service; barbarian leaders began to play an increasingly active role in the Roman Empire.
RL74501. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX Thessalonica 62(a)1 (S), LRBC II 1864, SRCV V 20340, Cohen VIII 12 corr., VF, interesting turrets, tight and slightly irregular flan, weight 0.925 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 345o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 384 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REIPVBLICE (glory of the Republic), campgate with two turrets, A left, TES in exergue; $90.00 (76.50)


Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

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In 395, after the death of Theodosius I, the Empire was re-divided into an eastern and a western half. The eastern half, centered in Constantinople, was under Arcadius, and the western half, centered in Rome, was under his brother Honorius. Also, in 395, Arcadius married Aelia Eudoxia, daughter of the Frankish general Flavius Bauto.
RL85612. Bronze centenionalis, Hunter V 51 (also 2nd officina), RIC X Arcadius 70, LRBC II 2791, SRCV V 20832, aEF, well centered on a broad flan, dark patina, edge cracks, edge chip, weight 2.124 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 300o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 395 - 401 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCITI (courage of the army), emperor standing facing, head right, spear in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, Victory holding wreath and palm crowns him, ANTB in exergue; ex David Connors; $70.00 (59.50)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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Valentinian II was declared Augustus shortly after his father's death. His influence steadily waned and after Gratian's death, he controlled only Italy. Although he and Theodosius II quickly repulsed the invasion of Magnus Maximus, his power waned again. He was strangled, probably at the orders of general Arbogastes.
RL86236. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Nicomedia 44(a)3-4 (S), LRBC II 2400, SRCV 20284, Cohen VIII 57, aVF, tight flan cutting off mintmark, weight 3.780 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINI-ANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCITI (courage of the army), emperor standing right, left foot on kneeling captive, vexillum in right hand, globe in left hand, palm frond in left field, SMNA or SMNB in exergue (off flan); scarce; $25.00 (21.25)


Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

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The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL86910. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX 86(c), LRBC II 2185, DOCLR 92 ff., SRCV V 20847, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, VF, tight flan, reverse legend not fully struck, weight 0.681 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople mint, 28 Aug 388 - 15 May 392 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory walking left holding trophy over right shoulder, dragging captive with left, staurogram left, CONS[...] in exergue; $24.00 (20.40)











Catalog current as of Wednesday, June 20, 2018.
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The Late Roman Empire