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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Late EmpireView Options:  |  |  | 

Coins of the Late Roman Empire

Maximus of Barcelona, Usurper in Hispania, 410 - 411 A.D.

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At the same time Honorius was clashing with the Visigothic King Alaric (who would sack Rome in 410), Picts invaded Britain, and Vandals, Alans and Suebi devastated Gaul. Honorius, in Ravenna, no longer even ruled the city of Rome; Visigoths had forced the Senate to appoint Priscus Attalus emperor. Out of desperation, the remnants of legions in the Britain elevated Constantine III and his son Constans II to the purple. Although Iberia was initially spared, in 409 Vandals and other barbarians laid waste to that land too. Constans II, who had been in Hispania, fled back to join his father in Gaul. Their general, Gerontius, remained in Spain, allied with the Vandals, and appointed Maximus as his own puppet emperor. Maximus was probably a senior staff officer, and may have also been a relative, possibly his son. Maximus was one of six men claiming to be Emperor in 410: Honorius (in Ravenna, the legitimate emperor of the West), Theodosius II (in Constantinople, the legitimate emperor of the East), Priscus Attalus (in Rome), Constantine III (in Arelatum), Constans II (in Vienne), and Maximus (in Barcino). Gerontius besieged, defeated and executed Constans II at Vienne. The general then besieged Constantine III at Arles, but the forces of Honorius joined the fight and defeated him. Gerontius was trapped and committed suicide. Maximus fled to his barbarian allies in Hispania who protected him until he was pardoned by Honorius. In 420, Maximus Tryannus rebelled in Hispania (it's uncertain that this was the same Maximus), but was quickly captured, taken to Ravenna, and executed by Honorius 422.
SL87405. Silver siliqua, RIC X 1601, RSC V 1b, Balaguer 1-37, King Fifth p. 291, Villaronga-Benages 4437, SRCV V 21081, NGC VG, strike 3/5, surface 2/5, clipped (4372590-001), weight 0.82 g, maximum diameter 13.5 mm, die axis 180o, Barcino (Barcelona, Spain) mint, 410 - 411 A.D.; obverse D N MAXIMVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTOR-IA AVGGG, Roma seated left on cuirass, Victory offering wreath, holding palm and standing on globe in Roma's right hand, inverted spear in her left hand, SMBA in exergue; ex Ira & Larry Goldberg auction 103 (20 Feb 2018), lot 2225; ex Edgar L. Owen; ex Gerhard Hirsch auction 284/285 (26 - 29 Sep 2012), lot 3076; very rare - only about 50 coins known of this emperor!; $1600.00 (1360.00)


Zeno, 18 January - 17 November 474 and August 476 - 11 April 491 A.D.

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Zeno, an Isaurian chieftain, married Emperor Leo I's daughter, Ariadne. Their son, Leo II, succeeded Leo I as emperor and shortly after declared his father Augustus. Unpopular, Zeno spent his 17-year reign fighting not only barbarians but also against many rebellions. He died after an epileptic fit.
SH87354. Gold solidus, RIC X 930 (pearl diadem, no jewel) var., DOCLR 632 var., Depeyrot 108/1 var., Tolstoi 16 var., SRCV V 21514 var., (none with this rev. legend error), near Mint State, lustrous, radiating flow lines, a few light marks, weight 4.496 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 180o, 4th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 2nd reign, Aug 476 - 11 Apr 491, 5th issue; obverse D N ZENO PERP AVG, helmeted bust facing, pearl diademed without jewel on crested helmet, cuirassed, spear in right hand over right shoulder, shield on left arm decorated with horseman riding down and spearing enemy; reverse VICTORI-A AVGGG ∆ (the final G appears to have been engraved as a T), Victory standing left, long jeweled cross in right, star right, CONOB in exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 67, lot 660; $1180.00 (1003.00)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and general under Julian II. After Jovian's death, the new emperors, Valentinian I and Valens, sent soldiers to arrest Procopius. He surrendered, but asked to meet his family; he had his captors dine and drink, and then seized the opportunity to flee with his family, first to the Black Sea and later to the Tauric Chersonese, where they hid. However, Procopius feared a betrayal, and decide to go on the offensive. On 28 Sep 365, he bribed two legions passing by Constantinople and proclaimed himself emperor. In April 366, Valens defeated Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira, ending his revolt. Procopius fled, but was later captured and executed.
RL87462. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Heraclea 7, LRBC II 1930, Cohen VIII 9, SRCV V 19881, Hunter V 1 var. (3rd officina), EF, dark patina, well centered and struck, bumps and marks, earthen encrustations, weight 2.758 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, chi-rho Christogram above right, pellet lower right, SMHB exergue; rare; $125.00 (106.25)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and a general under Julian II. Some contemporary historians of Procopius claim that Julian II had meant for the general to succeed him instead of Jovian. Whether true or not, Jovian gained the throne and Procopius retired. After Jovian died, the next emperors, Valentinian and Valens, had Procopius arrested. Procopius escaped and, on 28 September 365, bribed two legions passing by Constantinople, proclaimed himself emperor, and took control of Thrace and Bithynia. In April 366, Valens defeated the troops of Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira in Phrygia, ending his revolt. Procopius fled the battlefield but was captured at Nacoleia and executed on 27 May 366.
RL84226. Bronze centenionalis, see CNG e-auction 268, lot 413 (no object left); cf. RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a), LRBC II 2081, SRCV V 19883, Cohen VIII 8 (all bust left), aVF, dark green patina with earthen deposits, tight flan, edge cracks, light scratches, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.544 g, maximum diameter 16.0 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing slightly left, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet on left, CONSE in exergue; apparently unpublished, extremely rare with bust right; $110.00 (93.50)


Procopius, 28 September 365 - 27 May 366 A.D.

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Procopius was a member of the Constantinian dynasty and general under Julian II. On 28 Sep 365, during the rule of Valentinian and Valens, he bribed two legions passing by Constantinople and proclaimed himself emperor. In April 366, Valens defeated Procopius in the Battle of Thyatira, ending his revolt. Procopius fled, but was later captured and executed.
RL74567. Bronze centenionalis, LRBC II 2082, RIC IX Constantinopolis 17(a)6 (R2), Cohen VIII 8, SRCV V 19883, aVF, green patina, typical tight flan, light marks, scratches and corrosion, weight 3.116 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 345o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 28 Sep 365 - Apr 366 A.D.; obverse D N PROCO-PIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed draped and cuirassed bust left; reverse REPARATIO FEL TEMP (happy times restored), Procopius standing facing, head right, labarum in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, uncertain object at feet, Chi-Rho in upper right field, CONSA in exergue; rare; $90.00 (76.50)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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In 380, Rome's enemies the Germans, Sarmatians and Huns were taken into Imperial service; barbarian leaders began to play an increasingly active role in the Roman Empire.
RL74501. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX Thessalonica 62(a)1 (S), LRBC II 1864, SRCV V 20340, Cohen VIII 12 corr., VF, interesting turrets, tight and slightly irregular flan, weight 0.925 g, maximum diameter 14.2 mm, die axis 345o, 1st officina, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, c. 384 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA REIPVBLICE (glory of the Republic), campgate with two turrets, A left, TES in exergue; $80.00 (68.00)


Leo I, 7 February 457 - 18 January 474 A.D.

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Leo came to the throne at a time when the Eastern Roman army was made up almost entirely by Germans, but through his efforts the influence of the powerful German military factions was ended.
RL87301. Bronze half centenionalis, cf. DOCLR 562 ff., SRCV V 21441 ff. (various obverse legends and mintmarks), F, green patina, tight flan cutting off obverse legend and mintmark, earthen deposits, cleaning scratches, weight 1.020 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, c. 462 - 472 A.D.; obverse D N LEONS P F AVG (or similar), pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Leo's Latin monogram (LEONS) within wreath, mintmark in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)


Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - Early October 404 A.D., Wife of Arcadius

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Eudoxia was the strong-willed wife of emperor Arcadius. They were married on 27 April 395 A.D. She exercised considerable influence over government policy, much to the disgust of many high ranking Romans, notably in the Church. Eudoxia died in childbirth in early October 404 A.D. Eudoxia and Arcadius had five children, including Theodosius II and Pulcheria, who were made emperor and empress after Arcadius died in 408 A.D.
RL87453. Bronze centenionalis, RIC X Arcadius 101 (S), LRBC II 2231, DOCLR 274, SRCV V 20892, VF, green patina with red earthen highlighting, well centered obverse, crowded reverse slightly off center, scratches, small edge cracks, weight 2.133 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated on cuirass inscribing Christogram on shield, CONSA in exergue; scarce; $75.00 (63.75)


Arcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

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The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL86910. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC IX 86(c), LRBC II 2185, DOCLR 92 ff., SRCV V 20847, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, VF, tight flan, reverse legend not fully struck, weight 0.681 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople mint, 28 Aug 388 - 15 May 392 A.D.; obverse D N ARCADIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory walking left holding trophy over right shoulder, dragging captive with left, staurogram left, CONS[...] in exergue; $24.00 (20.40)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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Valentinian II was declared Augustus shortly after his father's death. His influence steadily waned and after Gratian's death, he controlled only Italy. Although he and Theodosius II quickly repulsed the invasion of Magnus Maximus, his power waned again. He was strangled, probably at the orders of general Arbogastes.
RL86236. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Nicomedia 44(a)3-4 (S), LRBC II 2400, SRCV 20284, Cohen VIII 57, aVF, tight flan cutting off mintmark, weight 3.780 g, maximum diameter 23.2 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, 25 Aug 383 - 28 Aug 388 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINI-ANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS EXERCITI (courage of the army), emperor standing right, left foot on kneeling captive, vexillum in right hand, globe in left hand, palm frond in left field, SMNA or SMNB in exergue (off flan); scarce; $22.00 (18.70)











Catalog current as of Friday, August 17, 2018.
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The Late Roman Empire