Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ 99-50 B.C.View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic, 99 - 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, C. Cassius Longinus, Proconsul and Imperator, Committed Suicide in 42 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Gaius Cassius Longinus (before 85 B.C. - October 42 B.C.) was a Roman senator, the prime mover in the conspiracy against Julius Caesar, and the brother in-law of Brutus.
RR86478. Silver denarius, BMCRE East 77 78, RSC I 4 4a, Crawford 500/3, Russo RBW 1762, Sydenham 221, Sear Imperators 221, SRCV I 1447/2, nice VF, attractive style, bumps and scratches, slightly off center, weight 3.906 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 180o, struck near Smyrna, Ionia(?), mobile military mint, spring 42 B.C.; obverse head of Libertas right, wearing stephane, earring, and necklace, CCASSI IMP upward behind, LEIBERTAS upward before; reverse capis (jug) and lituus (emblems of the Augurate), LENTVLVS / SPINT (moneyer legate P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther) in two lines below; ex Numismatik Lanz Mnchen auction 164 (23 May 2017), lot 116; rare; $900.00 (765.00)


Roman Republic, L. Cassius Longinus, 63 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
This coin honors the moneyer's ancestor, L. Cassius Longinus Ravill. The obverse alludes to his appointment as quaesitor in 113 B.C. for the retrial of three Vestal Virgins accused of unchastity. The reverse commemorates his successful proposal of the Lex Cassia Tabellaria in 137 B.C., changing the Republic's voting system to the secret ballot. To vote on a law, Roman ballots were marked V for uti rogas, meaning "as you ask," or the negative A for antiquo, meaning "maintain things as they are." For judicial votes, not guilty ballots were marked either A for absolvo or L for libero. Guilty ballots were marked either C for condemno or D for damno.

The obverse control letters come only from the moneyer's praenomen and nomen, L CASSI. A reversed S was used to indicate the second S in his name.
RR86173. Silver denarius, BMCRR I Rome 3929 (same A control letter), Crawford 413/1, Sydenham 935, RSC I Cassia 10, SRCV I 364, gVF, toned, bumps, banker's marks, reverse off center, weight 3.811 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 63 B.C.; obverse veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, A (control symbol) before; reverse voter standing left, dropping tablet (ballot) inscribed V into a cista, LONGIN IIIV downward behind; from the Lucas Harsh Collection; $300.00 (255.00)


Roman Republic, c. 169 - 91 B.C., Unofficial Issue

Click for a larger photo
Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M and N (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M above; ex FORVM (2006), ex Goodman collection; $140.00 (119.00)


Roman Republic, C. Coelius Caldus, 51 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The obverse depicts the moneyer's grandfather, also Caius Coelius Caldus, consul in 94 B.C., and the first in his family to obtain high office. Prior to his term as consul, in 107 B.C., he was a tribune of the plebs and passed a lex tabellaria, requiring a secret ballot to determine the verdict in cases of high treason. He was a praetor in 100 or 99 B.C., and proconsul of Hispania Citerior the following year. Later, during Sulla's second civil war, he tried to help Gaius Marius the Younger by preventing Pompey from joining his forces to Sulla, but failed.

The reverse honors the moneyer's father and uncle. His father was a Epulo Jovis, one of the septemviri Epulones, the college of seven priests responsible for banquets and sacrifices given in honor of Jove and the other gods. His uncle was an imperator, augur and decemvir, Imperator, Augur, Decemvir (sacris faciundis), commander for military forces, a priest-soothsayer, and one of a body of ten Roman magistrates responsible for management of the Games of Apollo, and the Secular Games. The moneyer's name and title are in the exergue.
RS72975. Silver denarius, Crawford 437/2a, Sydenham 894, RSC I Coelia 7, BMCRR II 3837, SRCV I 404, Choice aF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 3.623 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 51 B.C.; obverse C COEL CALDVS downwards on right, COS below, head of Coelius Caldus right, standard inscribed HIS (Hispania) behind, standard in the form of a boar (emblem of of Clunia, Hispania) before; reverse C CALDVS downward on left, IMP A X (Imperator, Augur, Decemvir) in four lines on right, CALDVS III VIR (ALD ligate, triumvir) below, statue of god seated left between two trophies of arms, all on a high lectisternium with front inscribed L CALDVS VI VIR EPVL (VIR and VL ligate, Lucius Caldus Septemvir Epulo); from the Jyrki Muona Collection; scarce; $110.00 (93.50)


Roman Republic, A. Plautius, c. 55 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 67 B.C., Aristobulus II rebelled against his older brother Hyrcanus II, the king of Judaea. Both brothers appealed to Pompey's deputy Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, who, bribed by a gift of 400 talents, decided in favor of Aristobulus. When Pompey arrived in Syria in 63 B.C., both brothers sent delegates to Damascus, but Pompey did not make an immediate decision. Aristobulus' followers refused to open the gates of Jerusalem and Romans forces besieged and captured the city. Pompey deemed Hyrcanus II, the elder, weaker brother a more reliable ally. Hyrcanus was restored as high priest, but not as king. Aristobulus was taken to Rome as a prisoner. In 57 B.C. Aristobulus escaped to Judaea and instigated another rebellion. A young cavalry commander, Marc Antony, led several men to scale Aristobulus' fortifications leading to his recapture. At the time this coin was struck in 55 B.C., Aristobulus was a prisoner in Rome. Julius Caesar released him in 49 B.C., hoping to turn Judaea against Pompey, but on his was to Judaea he was poisoned by a Pompey supporter. With help from the Parthians, Aristobulus' son Antigonus rebelled against Rome and became king in 40 B.C. He was defeated by Rome and killed in 37 B.C.

This special issue was struck by an Aedile Curule. Aediles supervised public works and staged games. Since this issue bears turreted Cybele, we may speculate it was to finance a building project.
RR86165. Silver denarius, RSC I Plautia 13, Sydenham 932, Crawford 431/1, BMCRR Rome 3916, Russo RBW 1540, SRCV I 395, aF, porous, bankers mark, weight 3.308 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 182o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse AED CVR S C downwards on left, A PLAVTIVS downwards on right, turreted head of Cybele right, wearing cruciform earring, hair rolled and in knot at the back, locks falling down neck; reverse Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, with left hand holding reins of camel standing right on his far side, raising olive branch in right hand, IVDAEVS upward on right, BACCHIVS in exergue; from the Lucas Harsh Collection, ex Vaughn Rare Coin Gallery, ex Ettinger Collection; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, D. Junius L.f. Silanus, 91 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 91 BC., the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus proposed extending Roman citizenship to allied Italian cities. He was assassinated, leading to the Social War.
RR86172. Silver denarius, BMCRR 1798 ff. (same obverse control - I), SRCV I 225, Sydenham 646, Crawford 337/3, RSC I Junia 15, VF, well centered, toned, weight 3.658 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 91 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, I (control mark) behind; reverse Victory in a biga right, reins in both hands, VII (control numeral) above, DSILANVS LF / ROMA in exergue; from the Lucas Harsh Collection; $100.00 (85.00)


Roman Republic, L. Marcius Censorinus, 82 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The moneyer selected the design to play on his name, Marsyas sounds like Marcius.

Marsyas found Athena's flute. Inspired by the breath of a goddess, it played beautifully. Foolishly he challenged Apollo to a musical contest. Apollo won by singing to the music of his lyre. As a just punishment for his presumption, Apollo flayed Marsyas alive. His blood was the source of the river Marsyas, and his skin was hung like a wine bag in the cave out of which that river flows.
RR86171. Silver denarius, Crawford 363/1d, Sydenham 737, RSC I Marcia 24, SRCV I 281, F, toned, bumps, scratches, banker's marks, weight 3.739 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 82 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, no control mark; reverse the satyr Marsyas standing left, bald, right arm raised, wine skin over shoulder shoulder in left hand, LCENSOR downward before, a column topped with Victory behind, no control mark; from the Lucas Harsh Collection, ex Warren Esty; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 170 - 160 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR76436. Bronze as, cf. McCabe Anonymous K2, Crawford 198/1a, Sydenham 143, BMCRR 217, SRCV I 712, F, pitting, weight 28.660 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 270o, Rome(?) mint, c. 170 - 160 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; scarce; $65.00 (55.25)


Roman Republic, C. Vibius C.F. Pansa, 90 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 90 B.C., Rome barely managed to stave off total defeat in the Social War. The Italians were denied citizenship and, despite making up over half the Roman army, were denied a fair share of the booty and lands. They rebelled and raised an army of 100,000 battle-hardened soldiers. After Roman victories and citizenship concessions, the war was nearly over by 88 B.C.
RR59575. Copper as, Crawford 342/7d; Sydenham 690b; SRCV I 744, F, weight 7.587 g, maximum diameter 26.3 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Janus, I above; reverse ROMA, three galley prows right, C VIBI AV (AV ligate) in exergue, I right; $60.00 (51.00)


Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 61, Oct 2011, The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins, Part 1

Click for a larger photo
The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins, Part 1.
BC15659. Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 61, Oct 2011, The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins, Part 1, softcover, 260 pages, 1220 lots, illustrated throughout, good condition, only one copy available, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $30.00 (25.50)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES


REFERENCES

Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Hoover, O.D. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Sunday, May 27, 2018.
Page created in 0.985 seconds.
Roman Republic Coins of 99-50 B.C.