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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Late EmpireView Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the Late Roman Empire

Anastasius I, 11 April 491 - 1 July 518 A.D.

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BZ87655. Bronze nummus, DOC I 15, Wroth BMC 59, Morrison BnF 1/Cp/AE/01, Hahn MIB 40, SBCV 13, LRBC II 2288, Sommer 1.9, Tolstoi -, Ratto -, VF, undersize flan typical of the type, porosity, weight 0.689 g, maximum diameter 9.0 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 491 - 498 A.D.; obverse diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse monogram of Anastasius ; $190.00 (Ä161.50)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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Due to a falling out at the Seleucid court, Ptolemy's eldest sister Berenice Phernophorus was murdered along with her infant son. In response Ptolemy III invaded the Seleucid Empire, today known as Iraq, Syria, among other nations at the time. During this war, the Third Syrian War, he occupied Antioch and even reached Babylon. In exchange for a peace in 241 B.C., Ptolemy was awarded new territories on the northern coast of Syria, including Seleucia Pieria, the port of Antioch. From this capture he received fifteen hundred talents of silver, roughly a tenth of his annual income. During his involvement in the Third Syrian War, he managed to regain many Egyptian works of art that had been stolen when the Persians conquered Egypt. While he was away fighting, he left his wife Berenice II in charge of the country, but swiftly returned when trouble erupted there. New insights of Ptolemy III's sudden return include papyri describing how the Nile river didn't flood for several years, resulting in famine, and a 20-year revolt against Greek rule in Thebes. One theory suggests the changes of the monsoon pattern were linked to a volcanic eruption which took place in 247 B.C.
GP88286. Bronze obol, Lorber CPE B368, Svoronos 975; SNG Cop 230; Weiser 93; BMC Alexandria p. 47, 15 - 16 (Ptolemy III); Noeske 165, VF, excellent style, well centered, light marks, some striking weakness, beveled obverse edge, central cavities, weight 14.928 g, maximum diameter 27.1 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, filleted cornucopia left, E between legs; ex Ora Eads Collection; ex CNG Sale 41 (19 Mar 1997), lot 1035 (part of); $160.00 (Ä136.00)


Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C.

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Ptolemy's first wife, ArsinoŽ I, a daughter of Lysimachus, was the mother of his legitimate children. After her repudiation he married his full sister ArsinoŽ II, the widow of Lysimachus, which brought him her Aegean possessions.
GP88283. Bronze hemiobol, Lorber CPE B441, Svoronos 842 (1 spec.), Malter 105, SNG Cop -, SNG Milan -, BMC Ptolemies -, Weiser -, Noeske -, Hosking -, F, dark patina, marks, scratches, beveled obverse edge, central cavities, weight 7.811 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 0o, Cyprus, Paphos mint, c. 246 - 222 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right with horn of Ammon, wearing taenia; reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King Ptolemy), eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head left, lotus flower before; ex Ora Eads Collection; ex CNG Sale 41 (19 Mar 1997), lot 1035 (part of); rare; $140.00 (Ä119.00)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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Marcian indirectly saved Rome from Attila the Hun. In 452, Attila captured and ransacked Aquileia, Milan, and other cities in Northern Italy. It seemed Attila would soon attack Rome itself, whose walls were weaker than some cities Attila had already captured. Meanwhile, however, Marcian's Eastern Roman forces had taken the offensive across the Danube, attacking the breadbasket of the Hunnic Empire. The loss of food supply from Attila's own land, and a famine and plague in Italy, depleted Attila's forces, allowing the Western Roman Empire to bribe him into returning to his homeland. Back home, Attila threatened to invade the Eastern Empire and enslave the entirety of it. Marcian and Aspar ignored his threats. The Eastern Empire had already paid Attila about six tons of gold, yet he still threatened them. They reasoned that gold would be better spent building up armies. Attila's attack never came, as he died unexpectedly in 453, either from hemorrhaging or alcoholic suffocation, after celebrating a marriage to one of his many wives. Attila's tribal confederation empire fell apart within a year after his death. Marcian settled numerous tribes, formerly under Attila, within Eastern Roman lands as foederati (subject tribes which gave military service in exchange for various benefits). Map 450 A.D.
RL87995. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X Marcian 555 (S), LRBC II 2469, DOCLR 497, SRCV V 21395, Hunter V 12 var. (monogram), Choice gF, very nice for the type!, well centered bold strike, light marks, encrustations, weight 1.128 g, maximum diameter 11.6 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian monogram (RIC monogram 2) in wreath, cross above, NICO in exergue, wreath broken by cross and mintmark; ex Beast Coins; scarce; $135.00 (Ä114.75)


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

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The cross was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because it symbolized a purposely painful and gruesome method of public execution that most early Christians would have personally witnessed. In 315, Constantine abolished crucifixion as punishment in the Roman Empire. The Ichthys, or fish symbol, was used by early Christians. Constantine adopted the Chi-Rho Christ monogram (Christogram) as his banner (labarum). The use of a cross as the most prevalent symbol of Christianity probably gained momentum after Saint Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, traveled to the Holy Land, c. 326 - 328, and recovered the True Cross.
RL88883. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Constantinopolis 82.2 (S), LRBC II 2174, SRCV V 20618, Cohen VIII 6, Hunter V 7 var. (staurogram vice cross), VF, dark green patina, weight 5.872 g, maximum diameter 23.1 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), empress standing facing, head right, cross right, arms folded on breast, CONSE in exergue; scarce; $100.00 (Ä85.00)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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Marcian indirectly saved Rome from Attila the Hun. In 452, Attila captured and ransacked Aquileia, Milan, and other cities in Northern Italy. It seemed Attila would soon attack Rome itself, whose walls were weaker than some cities Attila had already captured. Meanwhile, however, Marcian's Eastern Roman forces had taken the offensive across the Danube, attacking the breadbasket of the Hunnic Empire. The loss of food supply from Attila's own land, and a famine and plague in Italy, depleted Attila's forces, allowing the Western Roman Empire to bribe him into returning to his homeland. Back home, Attila threatened to invade the Eastern Empire and enslave the entirety of it. Marcian and Aspar ignored his threats. The Eastern Empire had already paid Attila about six tons of gold, yet he still threatened them. They reasoned that gold would be better spent building up armies. Attila's attack never came, as he died unexpectedly in 453, either from hemorrhaging or alcoholic suffocation, after celebrating a marriage to one of his many wives. Attila's tribal confederation empire fell apart within a year after his death. Marcian settled numerous tribes, formerly under Attila, within Eastern Roman lands as foederati (subject tribes which gave military service in exchange for various benefits). Map 450 A.D.
RL89178. Bronze nummus, RIC X Marcian 548 (S), LRBC II 2463, SRCV V 21396, DOCLR 507, aVF, dark green patina, typical tight flan, weight 1.363 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian monogram (RIC monogram 5) in wreath, NIC in exergue (off flan); scarce; $100.00 (Ä85.00)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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The Column of Marcian was dedicated to Marcian, built by the praefectus urbi Tatianus, sometime between 450 and 452. It still stands in modern Istanbul, though the statue of Marcian which originally topped it has been lost. Marcian also had a statue in the Forum of Arcadius, which contained the statues of several of Arcadius' successors.Column of Marcian
RL87908. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X Marcian 553 (R), LRBC II 2464, SRCV V 21396, Hunter V 12 var. (monogram variation), VF, well centered on a tight flan, green patina, earthen encrustation, small edge crack, weight 0.978 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c 450 - 457 A.D.; obverse D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian monogram (RIC monogram 4) in undivided wreath, no cross above, NIC in exergue; ex Beast Coins; rare; $95.00 (Ä80.75)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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At the beginning of Marcian's reign, the Eastern Roman treasury was almost bankrupt, due to the huge tributes paid to Attila by Theodosius. Marcian reversed this near bankruptcy not by levying new taxes, but rather by cutting expenditures. Upon his accession, he declared a remission of all debts owed to the state. Marcian attempted to improve the efficiency of the state in multiple ways, such as mandating that the praetorship must be given to senators residing in Constantinople, attempted to curb the practice of selling administrative offices, and decreed that consuls would be responsible for the maintenance of Constantinople's aqueducts. He repealed the Follis, a tax on senators' property which amounted to seven pounds of gold per year. Marcian removed the financial responsibilities of the consuls and praetors, who had since the time of the Roman Republic been responsible for funding the public sports games or giving wealth to the citizens of Constantinople, respectively; additionally, he made it such that only the Vir illustris could hold either office. By the time of his death, Marcian's shrewd cutting of expenditures and avoidance of large-scale wars left the Eastern Roman treasury with a surplus of 100,000 pounds (45,000 kg) of gold.
RL87909. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X Marcian 561 (R), LRBC II 2609, SRCV V 21398, Hahn MIB 33, DOCLR -, Hunter V -, VF, tight flan, obverse off center, edge crack, small pit on obverse, weight 1.354 g, maximum diameter 10.8 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 453 - 457 A.D.; obverse D N MARCINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian's monogram (RIC monogram 1) , in wreath, CVZ in exergue; ex Beast Coins; rare; $95.00 (Ä80.75)


Leo I, 7 February 457 - 18 January 474 A.D.

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Leo I (Latin: Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus; 401 Ė 18 January 474) was Eastern Roman Emperor from 457 to 474. A native of Dacia Aureliana near historic Thrace, he was known as Leo the Thracian. Ruling the for nearly 20 years, Leo proved to be a capable ruler. He oversaw many ambitious political and military plans, aimed mostly at aiding the faltering Western Roman Empire and recovering its former territories. He is notable for being the first Eastern Emperor to legislate in Greek rather than Latin. He is commemorated as a Saint in the Orthodox Church, with his feast day on January 20.
RL87910. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 693 (R), LRBC II 2264, DOCLR 565, cf. SRCV 21441 ff., Hunter V -, VF, tight flan, crude, weight 0.580 g, maximum diameter 8.5 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 462 - 472 A.D.; obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar, all off flan or unstruck), pearl-diademed, draped [and cuirassed?] bust right; reverse Leo's Latin monogram within wreath, mintmark in exergue (off flan); ex Beast Coins; rare; $95.00 (Ä80.75)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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Marcian laid out many legal reforms in his five novels, or codes of law, many of which were targeted at reducing the corruption and abuses of office that existed during the reign of Theodosius. Marcian decreed that anyone who performed pagan rites would lose their property and be condemned to death, and that no pagan temples, which had previously been closed, could be re-opened. He repealed a marriage law enacted by Constantine I, which decreed that a man of senatorial status could not marry a slave, freedwoman, actress, or woman of no social status (humilis), in an attempt to preserve the purity of the senatorial class. Marcian adjusted this law by declaring that the law should not exclude a woman of good character, regardless of her social status or wealth. He banned the export of weapons, and tools used to manufacture them, to barbarian tribes. In order to ensure his laws were implemented, he set a penalty of 50 pounds (23 kg) of gold for any judge, governor, or official who did not enforce the law.
RL87911. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X Marcian 561 (R), LRBC II 2609, SRCV V 21398, Hahn MIB 33, DOCLR -, Hunter V -, VF, typical tight flan, earthen deposits, light marks, weight 1.192 g, maximum diameter 11.0 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 453 - 457 A.D.; obverse D N MARCINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian's monogram (RIC monogram 1) , in wreath, CVZ in exergue; better in hand than the photos suggest, ex Beast Coins; rare; $95.00 (Ä80.75)




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, April 24, 2019.
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The Late Roman Empire