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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Collections| ▸ |David Cannon Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

The David Cannon Collection

Selinous, Sicily, c. 540 - 415 B.C.

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The leaf/incuse didrachms of Selinus vary in the shape and features of the leaf, and the number of divisions and arrangement of the incuse. We have been unable to find an exact match to this coin.
SH86511. Silver didrachm, Arnold-Biucchi Selinus 6; HGC 2 1211 (R1); SNG ANS 679; SNG Cop 592; SNG Ash 1886; SNG Delepierre 602; Selinous Hoard pl. 2, 25; BMC Sicily p. 138, 7, VF, toned, die wear, etched surfaces, flan crack, weight 8.276 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 0o, Selinus mint, c. 540 - 415 B.C.; obverse selinon (wild parsley) leaf, two tiny pellets at base of stem; reverse incuse square divided into twelve triangular alternating deeper and shallower sections; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; SOLD


Tyre, Phoenicia, 80 - 79 B.C., The Temple Tax Coin

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Half Shekel - the currency of the Jerusalem Temple.

At the Great Temple in Jerusalem the annual tax levied on Jews was 1/2 shekel per male. The 1/2 shekel and shekel were not always used in everyday commerce, but were the only coins accepted by the temple. Many taxpayers required a currency exchange, so money changers set up in the Temple court. Jesus found this business and their shouting (advertising rates) offensive, so he threw over their tables.
SH86530. Silver half shekel, HGC 10 358; Cohen DCA 921 (S); BMC Phoenicia p. 251, 226 var. (different monogram right); cf. Rouvier 2131 (this year and monogram, shekel), aVF, centered, toned, scrapes, edge chips and lamination defects, corrosion, rough, weight 5.430 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 80 - 79 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Melqart right, lion's skin knotted around neck; reverse TYPOY IEPAΣ KAI AΣYΛOY (of Tyre the holy and inviolable), eagle standing left, right foot on ship's ram, palm frond behind, ZM (year 47) over club left, ΦIΛ monogram right, Aramaic letter bet between legs; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Adramytion, Mysia

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Manius Aquillius, governor of the province of Asia from 129 to 126 B.C., rebuilt the road that connected Adramyttium and Smyrna. During the First Mithridatic War, the strategos Diodorus had the the city council killed and gave control to Mithridates VI, King of Pontus. In 88 B.C., Mithridates ordered the execution of all Roman settlers. At Adramyttium, the Romans were driven into the sea and slaughtered. At the end of the war, Xenocles of Adramyttium, was sent to Rome to defend the actions of the city.Adramyttium, was deprived of its autonomy, and was henceforth obligated to pay regular taxes to Rome. According to the Acts of the Apostles, whilst en route to Rome, St. Paul departed Caesarea Maritima on a ship from the city of Adramyttium which took him to Myra in Lycia.
SH86520. Bronze AE 20, RPC I Supp. S2332A, Stauber 163, SNG BnF -, BMC Mysia -, VF, green patina, weight 6.886 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 15o, Adramytion (Edremit, Turkey) mint, obverse SEBASTOS (upward behind), laureate and draped bust of Augustus left; reverse laureate head of Zeus left; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins, ex Moneta Numismatic Services; extremely rare, this coin on AsiaMinorCoins.com described as the finest of only two known specimens; SOLD


The First Jewish Revolt, 66 - 70 A.D.

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
JD86547. Bronze 1/8 shekel, Kadman III 37, Hendin 1369, Meshorer TJC 214, VF, well centered, highlighting earthen deposits, weight 5.778 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Jerusalem mint, year 4, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse Omer cup with pearled rim; reverse bundle of lulav flanked by two ethrogs; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; SOLD


Kos, Carian Islands, c. 345 - 340 B.C.

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Herakles was traveling by sea when Hera, who hated him, sent a storm, sinking his boats. Hercules and only a few friends survived, swimming to Kos. Once ashore they asked a shepherd for food and shelter. The shepherd refused and insulted Hercules and they fought. People from nearby Antimachia joined the fight against Hercules. Hercules and his friends slipped into a house, disguised as women, and escaped. Another town welcomed Hercules and declared war on Antimachia. Hercules killed the king of Antimachia and married the newly elected king's sister, Halkiopi. Their son, Thessalos, would later be the king of Kos and Nisyros.
GS86516. Silver didrachm, Pixodarus p. 234, 13 (A2/P7); SNG Cop 619; Weber 6629; HGC 6 1305 (R1); BMC Caria p. 195, 18 ff. var. (magistrate); SNG Keckman 287 var. (same), gVF, attractive style, bold strike, toned, tight flan cutting off ethnic, corrosion, edge cracks, weight 6.369 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 0o, Kos mint, Ma[...], magistrate, c. 345 - 340 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse veiled female (Halkiopi?) head left, MA (magistrate) behind, KΩION below; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; SOLD


Persian Empire, Mazaios, Satrap of Cilicia, 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaios was the Persian satrap of Cilicia beginning about 361 B.C. and in about 345 B.C. he was also made satrap of Transeuphratesia (which included Syria and Judaea). In 331 B.C., Mazaios was defeated by Alexander the Great at the Battle of Gaugamela, after which he fled to Babylon. Later that year Mazaios surrendered Babylon, the capital of the Persian Empire, to Alexander. For surrendering without a fight, Alexander appointed Mazaios governor of Babylon. He died in 328 B.C.
GS86510. Silver stater, SNG Levante supp. 20, Casabonne 2D, SNG BnF 335 var. (TN vice NT), SNG Cop 311 var. (same and monogram on rev.), SNG Delepierre 2880 var. (same), VF, obverse slightly off center, die wear, some porosity, weight 10.261 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361/360 - 334 B.C.; obverse BLTRZ (Baaltars) in Aramaic (read upward) behind, Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs; bunch of grapes, grain ear, and eagle in right hand; lotus headed scepter vertical behind in left hand; Aramaic NT lower left, Aramaic M below throne; reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazaios) in Aramaic (read right to left) above; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; SOLD


Knidos, Caria, c. 210 - 185 B.C.

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The ancient Carian city of Knidos, near modern Tekir, Turkey, was described by Strabo as "built for the most beautiful of goddesses, Aphrodite, on the most beautiful of peninsulas." The legendary Aphrodite of Praxiteles, one of the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, once graced her temple at Knidos. It has perished, but late copies exist, of which the most faithful is in the Vatican Museums. A fine seated statue of Demeter and a colossal figure of a lion found there are in the British Museum.
GS86557. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 318, Imhoof-Blumer Karische 32, Waddington 2312, SNG Keckman -, SNGvA -, SNG Kayhan -, SNG Mn -, SNG Tb -, SNG Mugla -, BMC Caria -, aEF, toned, tight flan typical for the type, encrustations, light corrosion, edge cracks, weight 5.531 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Knidos (near Tekir, Turkey) mint, magistrate Agephon..., c. 210 - 185 B.C.; obverse head of Helios facing slightly right; reverse forepart of roaring lion right, club to left, KNI∆ION above, AΓEΦΩN (magistrate) below; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Tarsos, Cilicia

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With a history going back over 6,000 years, Tarsus has long been an important stop for traders and a focal point of many civilisations. It was the scene of the first meeting between Mark Antony and Cleopatra, and the birthplace of Paul the Apostle. Under Rome, Tarsos was an important intellectual center, boasting its own academy. One of its leading disciples, the philosopher Athenodorus Cananites, was the Augustus' tutor, which secured continuous imperial patronage for the city. It was made the capital of the Roman province of Cilicia.
SH86513. Silver tetradrachm, RPC I 4004; Prieur 748 (12 spec.); SNG Levante 988; SNG BnF 1388; AMC I 1424; Walker Metrology I 566; BMC Lycaonia -, VF, toned, well struck, centered on a tight flan cutting off tops of part of legend, rough and porous surfaces, weight 13.090 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 1 B.C. - 10 A.D.; obverse KAIΣAPOΣ ΣEBAΣTOY, laureate head of Augustus right; reverse MHTPOΠOΛEΩΣ, Tyche (city goddess) seated right, turreted and veiled, palm frond in right hand, river-god Kydnos swimming right below, TAP (Tarsos) monogram in right field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; SOLD


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Miletos, Ionia

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The New Testament mentions Miletus as the site where the Apostle Paul in 57 A.D. met with the elders of the church of Ephesus near the close of his Third Missionary Journey, as recorded in Acts of the Apostles (Acts 20:15?38). It is believed that Paul stopped by the Great Harbor Monument and sat on its steps. He may have met the Ephesian elders there and then bid them farewell on the nearby beach. Miletus is also the city where Paul left Trophimus, one of his travel ling companions, to recover from an illness (2 Timothy 4:20). Because this cannot be the same visit as Acts 20 (in which Trophimus accompanied Paul all the way to Jerusalem, according to Acts 21:29), Paul must have made at least one additional visit to Miletus, perhaps as late as 65 or 66. Paul's previous successful three-year ministry in nearby Ephesus resulted in the evangelization of the entire province of Asia (see Acts 19:10, 20; 1 Corinthians 16:9). It is safe to assume that at least by the time of the apostle's second visit to Miletus, a fledgling Christian community was established in Miletus.
RP86540. Billon AE 22, RPC I 2710 (6 specimens); SNG Cop 1008; SNG Tbingen 3083; BMC Ionia p. 198, 147; SNGvA -; SNG Mnchen -, VF, attractive style, near black dark patina, scratches, reverse slightly off center, weight 5.875 g, maximum diameter 21.5 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, 25 Jan 41 - 13 Oct 54 A.D.; obverse ΣEBAΣTOΣ (counterclockwise behind), laureate head right, star of eight rays before; reverse male lion walking right on exergue line, head turned back left looking at star of eight rays above, MIΛH-ΣIΩN (starting in exergue, then counterclockwise on right); not even a single of auction recorded for this type on Coin Archives; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; extremely rare; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Judaea Capta

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This type celebrates the success of Vespasian and Titus in quelling the First Jewish Revolt. Coins commemorating this event are referred to as "Judaea Capta" issues.
JD86563. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 2; Hendin 1479; BMCRE II 35; RSC II 226; Hunter I 18; SRCV I 2296, VF, well centered on a tight flan, toned, bumps and scratches, weight 3.249 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 69 - 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVDAEA, Jewess seated right, mourning, veiled, supporting chin with left hand, trophy of captured arms behind her; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; SOLD




  




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Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 19, 2019.
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D. Cannon Collection