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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Collections ▸ David Cannon CollectionView Options:  |  |  | 

The David Cannon Collection

Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 27 B.C.

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The Tyche / Sandan type was the only autonomous silver issue of Tarsos. Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
GS86512. Silver drachm, cf. SNG Levante 925; SNG BnF 1295; BMC Lycaonia p. 178, 94; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -, VF, bold strike, iridescent toning, tight flan, light marks, slight porosity, weight 3.918 g, maximum diameter 16.1 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 164 - 27 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Tyche right, bead and reel border; reverse Sandan standing right on the back of a mythical horned and winged goat-like animal walking right, he draped and wears a high headdress, bow case and sword on his left side, right hand extended, ax in left hand; two monograms behind (off flan), TAPΣEΩN (downward on right); from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare; $320.00 (281.60)


Knidos, Karia, 2nd Century A.D.

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"In Roman times Cnidus seems from its scanty coinage to have lost its former importance. Only a few coins exist, Nero to Caracalla..." -- B. V. Head in Historia Numorum
RP86514. Bronze AE 20, RPC Online IV temp 975 (19 spec.); Nordb XXIX 1262; SNG Cop 331; BMC Caria p. 97, 97; Lindgren I 639; SNGvA -; SNG Keckman -; SNG Mn -; SNG Tb -, VF, tight flan cutting off parts of obverse legend, obverse legend weak, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 7.174 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, Caria, Cnidus mint, legate Eupoleitas, 2nd century A.D.; obverse T K T EΠI EYΠOΛEITA, bearded male head right; reverse flaming column altar, KNI-∆IΩN divided across field; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; very rare, none on Coin Archives, RPC lists only three examples sold at auction, the last sold in 2006; $320.00 (281.60)


Seleukeia Pieria, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 99 - 98 B.C.

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Seleucia Pieria, also known in English as Seleucia by the Sea, was the capital of Seleucus I Nicator, in Syria Prima. The city was built, slightly to the north of the estuary of the river Orontes, between small rivers on the western slopes of the Coryphaeus, one of the southern summits of the Amanus Mountains. The Macedonians called the landscape Pieria, after a district in their homeland that was also between the sea and the Olympus mountains.
GS86565. Silver tetradrachm, Weber 7994 (same dies); BMC Galatia p. 271, 18 var. (Γ); SNG Mnchen 963 var. (Θ); Hunterian III p. 213, 18 var. (same); HGC 9 1382, gF, centered on a tight flan, toned, rough, heavy scratches, weight 13.647 g, maximum diameter 30 mm, die axis 0o, Seleukeia Pieria mint, 99 - 98 B.C.; obverse turreted and veiled head of Tyche right, wearing earring, bead and reel border; reverse ΣEΛEYKEIAΣ / THΣ IEPAΣ / KAI / AYTONOMOY, fulmen (thunderbolt), taenia (ribbon) and cushions on the pulvinar (symbolic empty throne) of Zeus, BI (year 12) between the legs, E/∆ monogram (control) lower inner right, all within a laurel wreath; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $120.00 (105.60)


Antiocheia, Pisidia, 138 - 192 A.D.

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A temple of Mn has been excavated at Antioch, Pisidia. Luna, the Greek moon goddess, was female, which seems natural because the female menstrual cycle follows the lunar month. But Mn was a male moon-god, probably originally of the indigenous non-Greek Karian people. By Roman times, Mn was worshiped across Anatolia and in Attica. He was associated with fertility, healing, and punishment. Mn is usually depicted with a crescent moon behind his shoulders, wearing a Phrygian cap, and holding a lance or sword in one hand and a pine-cone or patera in the other. His other attributes include the bucranium and cock.
RP86522. Bronze AE 13, Kryzanowska table 22 (uncertain dies), SNG BnF 1069 var. (legends), SNG Cop 16 var. (legends), SNGvA -, VF, well centered, slightly rough, weight 1.556 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 270o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, 138 - 192 A.D.; obverse ANTIOC, draped bust of Mn right, on crescent, wearing Phrygian cap; reverse COLONIA, rooster standing right; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; scarce; $110.00 (96.80)


Pantikapaion, Tauric Chersonesos, c. 480 - 470 B.C.

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Panticapaeum (Kerch, Ukraine) was an important city and port in Tauric Chersonesos on the western side of the Cimmerian Bosporus. It was founded by Milesians in the late 7th or early 6th century B.C. In the 5th century B.C. it became the capital of the Thracian kings of Bosporus. The last of the kings of Bosporus left it to Mithridates VI Eupator, king of Pontus. After his defeat to Rome, he committed suicide at Panticapaeum in 63 B.C. In that same year, the city was partly destroyed by an earthquake.
GA86537. Silver hemiobol, Frolova, type I, 25 - 26; SNG Stancomb 511; SNG Fitzwilliam 1592; Klein 73; McClean II 4442; HGC 7 40 (R2), gF, toned, tight irregular flan, etched porous surfaces, weight 0.613 g, maximum diameter 9.1 mm, die axis 0o, Pantikapaion (Kerch, Crimea) mint, c. 480 - 470 B.C.; obverse facing lion head; reverse quadripartite incuse square; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; rare; $80.00 (70.40)


Amphipolis, Macedonia, c. 148 - 31 B.C.

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Excavations of Roman Amphipolis have revealed traces of all the impressive architecture one would expect from a thriving Roman city. A bridge, gymnasium, public and private monuments, sanctuaries, and cemeteries all attest to the city's prosperity. From the early Christian period (after 500 CE) there are traces of four basilicas, a large rectangular building which may have been a bishop's residence, and a church. -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
GB86505. Bronze chalkous, SNG Cop 78 (same dies); SNG ANS 140 (same dies); Lindgren II 952 (same dies); BMC Macedonia p. 51, 65; HGC 3.1 -, VF, well centered, light corrosion and encrustations, edge splits, weight 4.368 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, c. 148 - 32/31 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet; reverse AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN, eagle standing slightly left on thunderbolt, wings partly open, head turned back right; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $75.00 (66.00)


Alexandreia Troas, Troas, c. 65 - 48 B.C.

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This type was from Alexandria Troas' last issues before the mint closed for nearly two centuries. The next time coins would be struck was during the reign of Antoninus Pius.
GB86528. Bronze quarter unit, Bellinger Troy A179; SNG Cop 97; SNG Mnchen 48; Mionnet II, p. 640, 71; BMC Troas -, aVF, dark green patina, cleaning scratches, off center on a broad flan, weight 1.788 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria Troas (Eski Stambul, Turkey) mint, c. 65 - 48 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse AΛ/EΞ in two lines within laurel wreath, wreath closed at the bottom with a MYHP monogram; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; extremely rare; $60.00 (52.80)


Assos, Troas, c. 400 - 241 B.C.

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Assos was a harbor city on the Gulf of Adramytteion, just north of the island of Lesbos. Hermias, a student of Plato, ruled Assos for a time during the 4th century B.C. He invited Plato's most famous student, Aristotle, who lived and taught in Assos for more than three years. When the Persians took the city, they executed Hermias and Aristotle fled to Lesbos. After visiting Alexandria Troas, Paul walked to Assos and visited the Christians there (Acts 20:13).
GB86554. Bronze AE 11, cf. SNG Cop 237 - 238; SNGvA 7587 - 7589; SNG Mnchen 158 - 162; SNG Tbingen 2567; BMC Troas p. 37, 10 - 22 (all various control symbols), aVF, dark patina, slightly off center, pitting, weight 1.327 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 180o, Assos mint, c. 400 - 241 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right, Attic helmet crested and ornamented with laurel branch and scroll; reverse griffin reclining left, AΣΣI above, obscure control symbol in exergue; from the David Cannon Collection, ex Beast Coins; $50.00 (44.00)







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Catalog current as of Monday, July 15, 2019.
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D. Cannon Collection