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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Mints ▸ SirmiumView Options:  |  |  | 

Sirmium, Pannonia (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia)

Sirmium (modern Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) was founded in the 3rd century B.C. by Illyrians or Celts, and conquered by the Romans in the 1st century B.C. It was the economic capital of Roman Pannonia and the birth-place of the emperors Probus, Maximianus, Gratian and Aurelian. During the tetrarchy it was the capital of the emperor Galerius, one of the four capital cities of the Empire (the other three being Trier, Mediolanum, and Nicomedia). Sirmium was the capital of the prefecture of Illyricum from 318, when praetorian prefectures were established, until 379, when the western part of Illyricum became part of Praetorian prefecture of Italia. Dates of operation: 320 - 326, 351 - 364, 379 and 393 - 395. Mintmarks: SIR, SIRM, SIROB, SM.


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

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The celebration for a reign anniversary typically began a year before the actual anniversary and lasted the entire year. The actual celebratory events were likely at the beginning and end of this year-long period. This means that coins celebrating an anniversary were often struck from up to a year before that anniversary. Julian was named Caesar by Constantius II in 355 and used this as the date of the beginning of his reign, not 360 when he was named Emperor by his troops in Gaul, nor 361 when Constantius died and he was acknowledged Emperor throughout the Empire. Thus the celebration of Julian's decannalia, or tenth anniversary of reign, was to begin in 364. In late 362, when Julian needed extra coinage to prepare for his Persian War, what better type to strike than a vota coinage? He really should not have used X for the Soluta, or vows completed, for two more years but it served as great propaganda. He was informing the populace that he will still be around in two years when the war is over.
RL85650. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Sirmium 108, LRBC II 1619, SRCV V 19172, Cohen VIII 151, Choice EF, well centered and struck, dark patina, weight 3.393 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right, shield in left; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, BSIRM in exergue; $160.00 (Ä136.00)


Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.

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At the end of the 4th century, Sirmium was brought under the sway of the Goths, and later, was again annexed to the Eastern Roman Empire. In 441, Sirmium was conquered by the Huns, and after this conquest, it remained for more than a century in the hands of various other tribes, including the Eastern Goths and Gepids. For a short time, Sirmium was the center of the Gepid State and King Cunimund minted gold coins there. After 567, Roman rule was restored again at Sirmium. The city was finally conquered and destroyed by the Avars in 582.
RL77940. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Sirmium 118, LRBC II 1623, SRCV V 19229, Cohen VIII 35, VF, green patina, light marks, weight 3.442 g, maximum diameter 20.3 mm, die axis 30o, 2nd officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, obverse D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VOT / V / MVLT / X in four lines within wreath, BSIRM in exergue; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren, ex Pegasi Numismatics; $32.00 (Ä27.20)


Julian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.

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Sirmium (modern Sremska, Serbia) was originally inhabited by Illyrians and Celts. Conquered by the Romans in the 1st century B.C., it became the capital of the Roman province of Lower Pannonia. Under Diocletian's Tetrarchy, Sirmium was made one of the four capitals of the Empire. From 318 to 379, which includes the time when this coin was struck, Sirmium was the capital of the Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum.
SH24800. Bronze centenionalis, RIC VIII Sirmium 108, LRBC II 1619, SRCV V 19172, Cohen VIII 151, EF, weight 3.547 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Sirmium (Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia) mint, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 A.D.; obverse D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, spear in right, shield in left; reverse VOT / X / MVLT / XX in four lines within wreath, ASIRM in exergue; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 21, 2017.
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Sirmium