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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Featured Collections| ▸ |BCD Collection||View Options:  |  |  |   

BCD Collection

BCD is the initials of a collector who wishes to remain anonymous. One of the largest collections ever formed, including great rarities and coins of superb quality, portions of the BCD collection have been sold in multiple auctions held by several different numismatic firms. As a result of BCD's superb scholarly research, the auction catalogs for his collection have become primary references.


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 480 - 460 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
SH34912. Silver stater, BCD Boiotia 348; Winterthur 1899, gVF, weight 12.170 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, Thebes mint, 480 - 460 B.C.; obverse Boeotian shield with rim divided into 12 segments; reverse incuse square of mill-sail pattern with Theta (cross in circle) at the center; ex BCD collection; ex Sotheby auction 21 Nov 1985, lot 100; SOLD


Mopsion, Thessaly, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

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Mopsion issued only bronze coins, and only c. 350 - 300 B.C. In Nomos 4, BCD notes, "The bronzes of Mopsion are practically impossible to find in nice condition and without flaws or corrosion. They are also very rare and desirable because of the their spectacularly eloquent reverse. The nicest one to come up for auction realized $18,000..."

Mopsion, in the Peneus valley half way between Larissa and Tempe, took its name from the Lapith Mopsos, a son of Ampyx. Mopsos learned augury from Apollo, understood the language of birds, and became an Argonaut seer. As depicted on this coin, he was one of the Lapiths who defeated the Centaurs. This battle was a favorite subject of Greek art. While fleeing across the Libyan desert from angry sisters of the slain Gorgon Medusa, Mopsos died from the bite of a viper that had grown from a drop of Medusa's blood. Medea was unable to save him, even by magical means. The Argonauts buried him with a monument by the sea, and a temple was later erected on the site.
GB87120. Bronze trichalkon, BCD Thessaly II 484, BCD Thessaly I 1210, Rogers 412, McClean 4648, HGC 4 537 (R2), SNG Cop -, Pozzi -, BMC Thessaly -, gF, dark garnet and black patina, well centered, a little rough, weight 8.082 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 225o, Mopsion (Bakraina(?), Greece) mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus facing slightly right, vertical thunderbolt to right; reverse MOΨ-EI-ΩN, Lapith Mopsos standing facing, nude, his head turned right, raising club in right hand and extending his left hand, fighting centaur that is rearing left and raising a bolder over its head with both hands preparing to throw it; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "HK ex Thess., April 02, $275.-"; very rare; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, 400 - 300 B.C.

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The chimera was a mythological monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia composed of the parts of a lion, a snake and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimaera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GS37427. Silver hemidrachm, SNG Cop 59 - 60; BMC Peloponnesus, p. 46, 118; BCD Peloponnesos 301.1, gVF, nicely centered, weight 2.809 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Sikyon mint, obverse Chimera standing left, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left, No above tail; ex BCD collection; SOLD


Achaean League, Olympia, Elis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 50 - 30 B.C.

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SH20831. Silver hemidrachm, Benner p. 86, 4; BCD Peloponnesos (LHS 96) p. 176, 688 (this coin); Clerk 272, EF, weight 2.181 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 180o, Olympia mint, obverse ΘPAKYΛEΩN (behind), laureate head of Zeus right; reverse large Achaian League (AX) monogram, NAT monogram above, FA ligate left, XE ligate right, thunderbolt below, all within laurel wreath; attractive depiction of Zeus, mint luster, ex BCD Collection, ex Harlan Berk; rare; SOLD


Larissa, Thessaly, Greece, c. 450 - 420 B.C.

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During religious games, the young men of Thessaly participated in bull jumping and bull wrestling. In bull wrestling, participants would jump from a horse, naked save a chlamys (cloak) and petasos (hat), to bring a bull down to the ground. The obverse shows a wrestler bringing down a bull and the reverse shows the horse running free after the leap was made. The game may have originated in Asia Minor and then traveled to Crete, where it is known the people of Thessaly learned the sport.
GS84620. Silver drachm, Lorber Thessalian 50, SNG Cop 110, BCD Thessaly I 1128, BCD Thessaly II 173 -174, HGC 4 420 (S), gVF, attractive classical style, toned, deposits, light marks, obverse slightly off center, weight 6.175 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 225o, Larissa mint, c. 450/440 - 420 B.C.; obverse hero Thessalos restraining bull, both left, holding band around its head, nude but for billowing chlamys tied around his neck, petasos tied around neck flying behind; reverse bridled horse rearing right, trailing rein, ΛAPI/ΣAIA in two lines above and below, all within shallow incuse square; ex CNG e-auction 386 (9 Nov 2016), lot 112; ex BCD Collection with his tag noting, "Ex Sotheby's New York, 9 Dec. 93, part of lot 323, the lot of 6 pieces for $1500 +10%, This piece cost $350.-"; scarce; SOLD


Livia, Wife of Augustus and Mother of Tiberius, Corinth, Corinthia

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In 33 A.D. Rome was hit by a financial crisis, due to poor fiscal policies. Land values plummeted, leading to a lack of cash, a crisis of confidence, and much land speculation. The primary victims were senators, knights and the wealthy. Many aristocratic families were ruined.
RX55011. Bronze AE 22, BCD Korinth 383, RPC I 1155, SNG Cop 214 var. (bust left), VF, weight 6.634 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 225o, Corinth mint, 32 - 34 A.D.; obverse L ARRIO PEREGRIN IIVIR, draped bust of Livia right; reverse L FVRIO LABEONE IIVIR, COR in ex, Hexastyle temple; ex BCD Collection with his round tag; rare; SOLD


Olympia, Elis, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 330 - 324 B.C.

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SH57844. Silver hemidrachm, BCD Olympia 336.11 (this coin); Seltman Olympia p. 104; BMC Peloponnesus L #35 p. 71, 114, VF, toned, weight 2.871 g, maximum diameter 16.3 mm, die axis 270o, Hera mint, c. 330 - 324 B.C.; obverse head of nymph Olympia right; reverse eagle standing left, head right, wings spread, F left, Γ below; ex CNG, ex BCD Collection (Leu Numismatics, auction 90, 10 May 2004); very rare; SOLD


Phalanna, Thessaly, Greece, 360 - 340 B.C.

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Coins of Phalanna (a few miles northwest of Larissa on the left bank of the Peneius) are scarce. There was also a Phalanna on Crete, colonized by Thessalians from Phalanna in Thessaly.
GS84798. Silver drachm, BCD Thessaly I 1250 (same dies); BCD Thessaly II 569; SNG Cop 199; BMC Thessaly p. 41, 1; Papaevangelou-Genakos 1; HGC 4 165 (R1), VF/F, fine classical style, toned, porous, reverse a little rough, weight 5.314 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 180o, Phalanna mint, 360 - 340 B.C.; obverse youthful male head with short, curly hair right; reverse FAΛ-ANN-A-IΩN, bridled horse prancing right without a rider; ex BCD with his round tag noting, "T/ne ex Thess., Oct. 86, £250.-"; SOLD


Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 330 - 280 B.C.

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The chimera was a mythological monstrous fire-breathing creature of Lycia composed of the parts of a lion, a snake and a goat. Usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that ended in a snake's head, the Chimera was one of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna and a sibling of such monsters as Cerberus and the Lernaean Hydra. The term chimaera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals, or to describe anything perceived as wildly imaginative or implausible.
GS90784. Silver triobol, BCD Peloponnesos 288.1; SNG Cop 58; BMC Peloponnesus p. 46, 117, VF, toned, centered, weight 2.763 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 180o, Sikyon mint, c. 330 - 280 B.C.; obverse Chimera standing left, raising forepaw, ΣI below; reverse dove flying left; I below head; ex CNG auction 231, lot 71; ex BCD Collection; SOLD


Thebes, Boiotia, Greece, 405 - 395 B.C.

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The largest city in Boeotia, leader of the Boeotian confederacy, and rival of Athens, Thebes sided with Persia during Xerxes' invasion in 480 B.C. Thebes ended Sparta's power at the Battle of Leuctra in 371. The Sacred Band of Thebes famously fell to Philip II at Chaeronea in 338. After a revolt in 335, Alexander the Great destroyed the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.
GS74435. Silver tetartemorion, BCD Boiotia 466; BMC Central p. 77, 87; SNG Cop 294; Bťrend Fractions 35; Head Boeotia 37, Choice VF, toned, weight 0.163 g, maximum diameter 6.4 mm, Thebes mint, 405 - 395 B.C.; obverse Boiotian ox-hide shield; reverse bunch of grapes on stem, Θ−E flanking above; ex BCD Collection; SOLD




  




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BCD Collection