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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Secessionist EmpiresView Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Coins of the Secessionist Empires

Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
RA73231. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 319 (C); Webb Carausius 375; SRCV IV 13644; Cohen VII 215; Hunter IV - (p. ccvii), gVF, much silvering, light marks, tiny encrustation, a little weak in centers, edge split/crack, weight 4.819 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse PAX AVG (the peace of the Emperor), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive-branch in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S - P across fields at center, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection, ex-Wayne C. Phillips; $340.00 (302.60)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RA84441. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 104 (R3), Cunetio 2427, RIC V 331, RSC IV 428a, SRCV III 10999, Hunter IV - (p. xci), Elmer -, gVF, nice portrait, tight flan, light earthen deposits, weight 3.994 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 45o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, c. 266 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVG (the valor of the Emperor), Emperor (or Virtus) standing right, bare-headed, wearing military garb, transverse spear in right hand, shield on left arm, small bound captive seated right at feet on right; very rare; $250.00 (222.50)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.

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A skilled general and administrator, Postumus rebelled against Gallienus, uniting Gaul, Spain, and Britain into a Gallic-Roman empire. Successful against the Germans, he kept his empire secure and prosperous. He was assassinated by his own troops after he refused to allow them to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz).
SH66364. Bronze double sestertius, Bastien Postume 87, RIC V 143 (Lugdunum), Cohen VI 177, VF, weight 13.981 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, die axis 0o, Colonia Agrippinensis or Treveri mint, 261 A.D.; obverse IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse LAETITIA AVG (the joy of the Emperor, AVG in exergue), galley left, four rowers and steersman; $240.00 (213.60)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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RA73269. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, - (cf. 155 for reverse type), weight 3.501 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 225o, Londinium (London, England) mint, obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SALVS AVG (the health of the Emperor), Salus seated left feeding serpent and holding long staff, no field marks, exeurge unreadable; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $230.00 (204.70)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The obverse and reverse legends and types are known from the London mint with MLXXI in the exergue and B - E across the reverse field (RIC V 31, Web Carausius 34). This variety, without marks and perhaps unofficial, is unpublished in the many references examined by Forum. We also could not find an example online. This is the only example known to Forum.
RA73246. Billon antoninianus, Apparently unpublished, RIC V -, Webb Carausius -, Casey -, Hunter -, SRCV IV -, King Unmarked -, Burton Latimer -, et al., aVF, green patina, broad flan, crude, light marks, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain mint, obverse IMP CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse FELICITAS AVG (the good fortune of the Emperor), Felicitas standing facing, head left, long caduceus vertical in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; possibly unique!; $225.00 (200.25)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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Balkerne Gate in Colchester is the largest Roman arch in Britain. Colchester (Camulodunum) and its wall were rebuilt by the Romans after Queen Boudica led a rebellion in A.D. 60 and destroyed the town. Balkerne Gate Colchester
RA73495. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 391; RIC V, part 2, 335 (S); Cohen VII 240; SRCV IV 13666; Hunter IV 143 var. (...P F IN AVG), VF, green patina, well centered, areas of corrosion, weight 3.604 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive-branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, S - P flanking across field, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very scarce; $225.00 (200.25)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73504. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 171; RIC V, part 2, 143 (R); Cohen VII 239; SRCV IV 13665; Hunter IV 50, VF, excellent centering, green patina, traces of silvering, scratches, marks, light corrosion, earthen deposits, weight 3.599 g, maximum diameter 23.6 mm, die axis 0o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, olive branch in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S - P flanking across field, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $225.00 (200.25)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73500. Billon antoninianus, Webb Carausius 167; RIC V, part 2, 141 (R); SRCV IV 13665; Cohen VII 241; Hunter IV 50 var. (scepter transverse), VF, attractive green patina with earthen highlighting, light marks, weight 2.846 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 45o, Londinium (London, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive branch in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left, S - P flanking across field, MLXXI in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; rare; $220.00 (195.80)


Gallic Empire, Postumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D., Struck by Aureolus

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This coin was struck in the name of Postumus by Aureolus (one of the so-called Thirty Tyrants) while Gallienus held him under siege in Milan. Ancient sources which refer to Aureolus are limited and contradictory. He may have made his own bid for the Purple after Gallienus was murdered and Postumus failed to take advantage of the turmoil in Italy. The new emperor Claudius soon brought his rebellion to an end. This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RA84412. Billon antoninianus, Schulzki AGK 18c, Cunetio 2479, Mairat 209, Elmer 612, Hunter IV 143, SRCV III 10938, RIC V 376 var., RSC IV 60 var., VF, attractive portrait, nice surfaces, tight flan cutting off parts of legends, weight 4.354 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Mediolanum (Milan) mint, 268 A.D.; obverse IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse FIDES EQVIT (to the loyalty of the cavalry), Fides seated left, patera in right hand, signum vertical behind in left hand, P in exergue; $220.00 (195.80)


Romano-British Empire, Carausius, Mid 286 - Spring or Early Summer 293 A.D.

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The quantity of PAX coinage issued by Carausius probably exceeded the entire output of all his other types combined. The type was an appeal by the usurper Carausius for peace with the "official" emperors. Diocletian and Maximian did not recognize Carausius as emperor, nor did they reciprocate his desire for peace.
RA73497. Billon antoninianus, RIC V, part 2, 334 (S); Webb Carausius 392, Cohen VII 241, SRCV IV 13666, Hunter IV - (p. ccvii), aVF, well centered, corrosion, bumps and scratches, weight 4.015 g, maximum diameter 22.3 mm, die axis 180o, Camulodunum (Colchester, England) mint, c. 292 - early 293 A.D.; obverse IMP C CARAVSIVS P F AVG, radiate and draped [and cuirassed?] bust right, from the front; reverse PAX AVGGG (the peace of the three emperors), Pax standing half left, head left, raising olive-branch in right hand, long scepter transverse in left hand, S - P flanking across field, C in exergue; from the Charles Peters Carausius Collection; very scarce; $200.00 (178.00)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, March 30, 2017.
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Secessionist Empires