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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |after 50 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic after 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, Dictatorship of Julius Caesar, L. Plautius Plancus, 47 B.C.

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Both the obverse and reverse designs of this type were also popular designs for intaglio engraved gems during the late republic. -- Roman Republican Coinage by Michael H. Crawford

Click here to read the article, "Medusa Coins - They'll Transform You."
RR37542. Silver denarius, Crawford 453/1c, Sydenham 959b, RSC I Plautia 14, Sear Imperators 29a, Russo RBW 1585, SRCV I 429, VF, weight 3.439 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 47 B.C; obverse head of Medusa facing, wearing hoop earrings, L·PLAVTIVS below; reverse Victory leading four horses right, palm frond in left, PLANCVS below; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., P Sepullius Macer

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"The coin that killed Caesar." The obverse legend declares Caesar is "Dictator for Life" and he wears the veil, symbolic of his life-term position as Pontifex Maximus. Caesar would be both the dictator and high priest of Rome for the remainder of his life, but his life would end only a few weeks after this coin was struck. For Caesar to put his image on coins and in effect declare himself king was too much for Brutus and his republican allies. On the Ides of March (15 March) 44 B.C. Caesar was stabbed to death by as many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. On his way to the Theater of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, "The ides of March have come," meaning to say that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied, "Aye, Caesar, but not gone." This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to "beware the Ides of March."

Minted for Caesar's planned Parthian war, this type was often carelessly struck indicating the mint was working under great pressure.
SH28916. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/13, Sydenham 1074, Sear CRI 107d, RSC I Julius Caesar 39, BMCRR I Rome 4173, SRCV I 1414, Vagi 56, gVF, weight 3.865 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, moneyer P Sepullius Macer, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled and wreathed head of Caesar right; reverse P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter in left hand, shield at feet right; superb portrait, toned, excellent centering and strike for the type; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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Struck by the Praetor Aulus Hirtius.
SH37593. Gold aureus, Crawford 466/1, Sydenham 1017, BMCRR 4050, Cohen 2, Julia 2, SRCV I 1395; Sear CRI 56; Calicó 37, gVF, weight 8.106 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, early 46 B.C.; obverse C•CAESAR COS TER, veiled head of Vesta right; reverse A•HIRTIVS•PR, emblems of the pontificate and augurship - jug between lituus to left, and axe to right; small scuff on obv, ex jewelry, ex CNG auction 166, lot 148; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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SH28052. Gold aureus, Crawford 466/1, Sydenham 1017, BMCRR 4050, Cohen 2, Julia 2, SRCV I 1395, gVF, broad, slightly irregular flan, weight 8.080 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Aulus Hirtius, Praetor, early 46 B.C.; obverse C • CAESAR COS TER, veiled head of Vesta right; reverse A • HIRTIVS • PR, emblems of the pontificate and augurship - jug between lituus to left, and axe to right; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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"The coin that killed Caesar." The obverse legend declares Caesar is "Dictator for Life" and he wears the veil, symbolic of his life-term position as Pontifex Maximus. Caesar would be both the dictator and high priest of Rome for the remainder of his life, but his life would end only a few weeks after this coin was struck. For Caesar to put his image on coins and in effect declare himself king was too much for Brutus and his republican allies. On the Ides of March (15 March) 44 B.C. Caesar was stabbed to death by as many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. On his way to the Theater of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, "The ides of March have come," meaning to say that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied, "Aye, Caesar, but not gone." This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to "beware the Ides of March."

Minted for Caesar's planned Parthian war, this type was often carelessly struck indicating the mint was working under great pressure.
SH87507. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/13, Sydenham 1074, Sear CRI 107d, RSC I Julius Caesar 39, BMCRR I Rome 4173, SRCV I 1414, Vagi 56, aEF, superb portrait, nice old cabinet toning, bumps, light scratches, off center, weight 3.743 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, moneyer P Sepullius Macer, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled and wreathed head of Caesar right; reverse P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter in left hand, shield at feet right; ex Forum (2008), ex Tom Cederlind; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., C. Cossutius Maridianus

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This coin was struck about a month after Julius Caesar was assassinated on March 15 (the Ides of March) by a group of senators, among them Gaius Cassius Longinus, Marcus Junius Brutus, and Caesar's Massilian naval commander, Decimus Brutus. In April, about the time this coin was struck, Octavian returned from Apollonia in Dalmatia to Rome to take up Caesar's inheritance, against advice from Atia (his mother and Caesar's niece) and consular stepfather Antony.
SH26589. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/19, Sydenham 1069, RSC I Julius Caesar 8, Sear CRI 112, SRCV I 1422, nice VF, superb portrait, some mint luster in recesses, light toning, small punch and light graffiti on reverse, weight 3.624 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, C. Cossutius Maridianus, moneyer, Rome mint, posthumous, Apr 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR PARENS PATRIAE (Caesar father of the country), wreathed and veiled head of Caesar right, lituus below chin, apex behind; reverse C COSSVTIVS / MARID-IANVS (moneyer's name) arranged in form of cross, A - A - A - F • F (Auro, Argento, Aere, Flando, Feriundo) in the angles; a superb example of this type sold in June 2014 for $67,500 plus auction fees!; scarce; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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"The coin that killed Caesar." The obverse legend declares Caesar is "Dictator for Life" and he wears the veil, symbolic of his life-term position as Pontifex Maximus. Caesar would be both the dictator and high priest of Rome for the remainder of his life, but his life would end only a few weeks after this coin was struck. For Caesar to put his image on coins and in effect declare himself king was too much for Brutus and his republican allies. On the Ides of March (15 March) 44 B.C. Caesar was stabbed to death by as many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. On his way to the Theater of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, "The ides of March have come," meaning to say that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied, "Aye, Caesar, but not gone." This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to "beware the Ides of March."

Minted for Caesar's planned Parthian war, this type was often carelessly struck indicating the mint was working under great pressure.
SH84607. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/13, Sydenham 1074, Sear CRI 107d, RSC I Julius Caesar 39, BMCRR I Rome 4173, SRCV I 1414, Vagi 56, gVF, nice portrait, toned, scratches, off center, edge cracks, weight 3.830 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, moneyer P Sepullius Macer, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled and wreathed head of Caesar right; reverse P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter in left hand, shield at feet right; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

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"The coin that killed Caesar." This coin declares Caesar is "Dictator for Life." He did serve as Dictator for the remainder of his life, but his life would end only a few weeks after this issue. For Caesar to put his image on coins and essentially declare himself king was too much for Brutus and his republican allies. This coin (along with other similar types) is sometimes called "the coin that killed Caesar." Minted for Caesar's planned Parthian war, this type was often carelessly struck indicating the mint was working under great pressure.
SH54776. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/10, Sydenham 1073, Sear CRI 107a, RSC I Julius Caesar 38, BMCRR I Rome 4169, gVF, toned, banker's mark, weight 3.971 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, moneyer P Sepullius Macer, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, veiled and wreathed head of Caesar right, banker's mark on cheek; reverse P SEPVLLIVS MACER, Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, shield leaning against scepter; from the Sierra Collection, nice clear legend; SOLD


C. Cassius Longinus, Proconsul and Imperator, Committed Suicide in 42 B.C.

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Gaius Cassius Longinus (before 85 B.C. - October 42 B.C.) was a Roman senator, the prime mover in the conspiracy against Julius Caesar, and the brother in-law of Brutus.
SH68259. Silver denarius, SRCV I 1446, BMCRR East 79, RSC I 7, Crawford 500/1, Sydenham 219, EF, weight 4.033 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, struck near Smyrna, Ionia(?), mobile military mint, early 42 B.C.; obverse C•CASSI• IMP, tripod surmounted by cauldron and two laurel branches, fillet hanging from either side; reverse LENTVLVS / SPINT (moneyer L. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther), capis and lituus (emblems of the Augurate); ex CNG auction 312, lot 174; very rare; SOLD


Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C., L. Aemilus Buca

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"The coin that killed Caesar." The obverse legend declares Caesar is "Dictator for Life" and he wears the veil, symbolic of his life-term position as Pontifex Maximus. Caesar would be both the dictator and high priest of Rome for the remainder of his life, but his life would end only a few weeks after this coin was struck. For Caesar to put his image on coins and in effect declare himself king was too much for Brutus and his republican allies. On the Ides of March (15 March) 44 B.C. Caesar was stabbed to death by as many as 60 conspirators, led by Brutus and Cassius. According to Plutarch, a seer had warned that harm would come to Caesar no later than the Ides of March. On his way to the Theater of Pompey, where he would be assassinated, Caesar passed the seer and joked, "The ides of March have come," meaning to say that the prophecy had not been fulfilled, to which the seer replied, "Aye, Caesar, but not gone." This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar when Caesar is warned by the soothsayer to "beware the Ides of March."

Minted for Caesar's planned Parthian war, this type was often carelessly struck indicating the mint was working under great pressure.
RS85152. Silver denarius, Crawford 480/7b, Sydenham 1062, Sear CRI 104a, RSC I Julius Caesar 24, Russo RBW 1682, BMCRR I Rome 4155, SRCV I 1410, Choice aEF, expressive portrait, well centered, light rose toning, some legend weak, banker's mark, light bumps and scratches, edge cracks, weight 3.867 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 90o, struck by L. Aemilus Buca, Rome mint, lifetime issue, Feb - Mar 44 B.C.; obverse CAESAR DICT PERPETVO, wreathed head of Caesar right; reverse Venus seated left, Victory in extended right, long transverse scepter in left hand, L:BVCA downward behind; ex Art of Money (Portland, OR); very rare; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Albert, R. Die Münzen der römischen Republik. (Regenstauf, 2003).
Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Berger, F. Die Münzen der Römischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
Buttrey, T. "The Denarii of P. Crepusius and Roman Republican Mint Organization" in ANSMN 21 (1976), p. 67-108.
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic Online - http://numismatics.org/chrr/
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006) pp. 321-356.
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
De Ruyter, P. "Denarii of the Roman Republican Moneyer Lucius Julius Bursio, a Die Analysis" in NC 156 (1996), p. 79 - 121, pl. 21 - 22.
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 63 BC - 49 BC. (London, 1995).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 81 BCE - 64 BCE. (Citrus Heights, CA, 2012).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 19, 2019.
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Roman Republic after 50 B.C.