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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Roman Republic ▸ 99-50 B.C.View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic, 99 - 50 B.C.

Roman Republic, L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, 62 B.C.

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At the end of the Third Macedonian War (171 - 168 B.C.), King Perseus of Macedonia was decisively defeated by Rome at the Battle of Pydna. He surrendered to general Lucius Aemilius Paullus and was imprisoned in Rome with his half-brother Philippus and his son Alexander. The Antigonid kingdom was replaced with four republics, which were later dissolved and became the Roman province of Macedonia.
RR88398. Silver denarius, RSC I Aemilia 10, Crawford 415/1, Sydenham 926, RBW Collection 1497, BMCRR I Rome 3373, SRCV I 366, Choice VF, toned, nice style, banker's mark, a few scratches, tiny edge cut, weight 3.857 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 62 B.C.; obverse PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia right; reverse Paullus on right, standing left, togate, with right hand touching trophy of captured arms in center; on the left, three standing bound captives: King Perseus of Macedonia, his half-brother, and his son, TER above PAVLLVS in exergue; $190.00 (€161.50)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 86 B.C.

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This type is from a late, massive, and intriguing anonymous issue undoubtedly struck by the moneyer triumvirate of Gargonius, Ogulnius and Vergilius. Their signed coins (SRCV I 263 - 265) have identical types and are scarce or rare.
RR88446. Silver denarius, Crawford 350a/2, Sydenham 723, RSC I 226, BMCRR I Rome 2622, RBW Collection 1333, SRCV I 266, gVF, well centered, reverse die wear, weight 4.046 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 86 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, thunderbolt below; reverse Jupiter in quadriga right, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, reins in left hand; ex Artemide Aste (San Marino); $180.00 (€153.00)
 


Roman Republic, A. Postumius A.f. Sp.n. Albinus, c. 81 B.C.

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Refers to the praetorship of L. Postumius Albinus over Spain and his successful expeditions against the Vaccaei and Lusitani, and the levying of troops for this campaign.

A fasces is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe with its blade emerging. It was a Roman symbol of a magistrate's power and jurisdiction. The image has survived in the modern world as a symbol of law and governance. It was the origin of the name of the Mussolini's National Fascist Party in Italy (from which the term fascism is derived). It is on the reverse of the U.S. Mercury dime and behind the podium in the U.S. House of Representatives.
RR88394. Silver denarius serratus, Crawford 372/2, Sydenham 746, RSC I Postumia 8, BMCRR I Rome 2839, RBW Collection 1393, SRCV I 297, gVF, dark toning, part of reverse not fully struck, tight flan cutting of exergue, weight 3.902 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, c. 81 B.C.; obverse HISPAN downward behind, veiled head of Hispania right with disheveled hair; reverse togate figure standing left, extending hand toward legionary eagle before him, fasces and axe behind, A• / ALBIN / N•S• vertical downward in fields from left to right, POST A•F• in exergue; $165.00 (€140.25)
 


Roman Republic, Quintus Cassius Longinus, 55 B.C.

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The obverse portrait has been variously interpreted as Bonus Eventus (the God of good Success) or Genius Populi Romani (the guardian spirit of the Roman people). Quintus Cassius Longinus was a governor in Hispania for Caesar. Cassius was one of the tresviri monetales of the Roman mint in 55 B.C. He served as a quaestor for Pompey in Hispania Ulterior in 54 B.C.
RR87659. Silver denarius, Crawford 428/3, Sydenham 916, RSC I Cassia 7, BMCRR I Rome 3868, RBW Collection 1535, SRCV I 391, aVF, light toning, highest points flatly struck, banker's marks, bumps and scratches, scrape on reverse, closed edge crack, weight 3.651 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse young male head (Genius Populi Romani or Bonus Eventus) right, scepter behind; reverse eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, lituus (augur's staff) on left, jug on right, Q•CASSIVS below; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Roman Republic, Manius Fonteius C.f., c. 85 B.C.

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Vejovis is a little-known Italian deity. He was worshiped in a temple on the Capitol in Rome. The reverse most likely depicts a statue that was beside the statue of Vejovis in the temple. This statue may refer to the infancy of Jupiter who was suckled by the goat Amaltheia on Mount Ida.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
RR88392. Silver denarius, Crawford 353/1a, Sydenham 724, RSC I Fonteia 9, BMCRR I Rome 2476, RBW Collection 1350, SRCV I 271, VF, elegant style, light toning, scratches, some porosity, slight crease from scrape on reverse, weight 3.662 g, maximum diameter 21.1 mm, die axis 150o, Rome mint, c. 85 B.C.; obverse MN FONTEI C F (MN and NT in monogram) downward behind, laureate head of Vejovis right, thunderbolt below neck truncation, Roma monogram below chin; reverse Cupid seated on goat right, caps of the Dioscuri above, thyrsus of Bacchus in exergue, all within laurel wreath; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Roman Republic, L. Furius Cn.f. Brocchus, 63 B.C.

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The curule chair was for senior Roman magistrates and was sometimes given as an honor to foreign kings by the Roman people or senate. Designed for use in the field, it could be folded for easy transport. It had no back, low arms, curved legs forming an X, and was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory. A fasces is a bound bundle of wooden rods, sometimes including an axe. It was a Roman symbol of a magistrate's power and jurisdiction. The image has survived in the modern world as a symbol of law and governance. It was the origin of the name of the Mussolini's National Fascist Party in Italy (from which the term fascism is derived). It is on the reverse of the U.S. Mercury dime and behind the podium in the U.S. House of Representatives.
RR88397. Silver denarius, Crawford 414/1, Sydenham 902a, RSC I Furia 23a, RBW Collection 1495, BMCRR I Rome 3896, SRCV I 365, VF, light marks, encrustations, scattered porosity, weight 3.707 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 63 B.C.; obverse III - VIR / BROCCI, head of Ceres right, wearing wreath of grain, lock of hair falls down neck, between wheat-ear and barley kernel; reverse L•FVRI / CN• F, curule chair between two fasces with axes; $160.00 (€136.00)
 


Roman Republic, D. Junius L.f. Silanus, 91 B.C.

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In 91 B.C. tribune Marcus Livius Drusus proposed Roman citizenship to allied Italian cities, leading to his assassination and the Social War. D. Junius L.f. Silanus was a moneyer, a magistrate, responsible for the production of the Roman coinage. Magistrates were not simple mint workers (monetarii), they were officials who controlled the process, including the design on the coins themselves. During the Roman Republic, moneyers were called tresviri aere argento auro flando feriundo, literally "three men for casting (and) striking bronze, silver (and) gold (coins)"
RR88385. Silver denarius, Crawford 337/3, Sydenham 646, RSC I Junia 15, SRCV I 225, cf. BMCRR I Rome 1790 (G / VII), RBW Collection 1233 (C / VI), VF, some luster, light tone, light scratches, faint graffito (M) under horses, reverse a little off center, weight 3.882 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 30o, Rome mint, 91 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, reversed G (control letter) behind; reverse Victory in a biga right holding reins in both hands, V[I?] (control numeral) above, D•SILANVS•L•F / ROMA in exergue; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Roman Republic, Quintus Titius, 90 B.C.

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Priapus, also called Mutinus Titinus, had a temple in Rome and was especially worshiped by young married women. His use by Quintus Titius is one of the usual found on Republican coinage.
RR88386. Silver denarius, Crawford 341/1, Sydenham 691, RSC I Titia 1, BMCRR I Rome 2220, RBW Collection 1274, SRCV I 238, VF, attractive dark toning, small thick flan cutting off Pegasus' head, obverse die wear, weight 3.780 g, maximum diameter 16.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse head of Priapus (Mutinus Titinus) right, wearing winged diadem, pointed beard, curly lock of hair down neck; reverse Pegasus springing right from a base or tablet inscribed Q•TITI; $140.00 (€119.00)
 


Roman Republic, Unofficial, c. 169 - 91 B.C.

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Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M • and N• (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M• above; ex FORVM (2006), ex Goodman collection; $125.00 (€106.25)
 


Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso L.f. Frugi, 90 B.C.

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In 90 B.C., Rome barely managed to stave off total defeat in the Social War. The Italians were denied citizenship and, despite making up over half the Roman army, were denied a fair share of the booty and lands. They rebelled and raised an army of 100,000 battle-hardened soldiers. After Roman victories and citizenship concessions, the war was nearly over by 88 B.C.
RR88359. Silver denarius, BMCRR I Rome 2023 var. (also hammer and flute, but R on obverse, V on reverse); Sydenham 669a; Crawford 340/1; RSC I Calpurnia 11; SRCV I 235, gF, toned, light marks, small edge splits, weight 3.751 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 90 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair falling in long ringlets, hammer (control symbol) behind, S (control letter) below chin, dot border; reverse naked horseman galloping right, holding palm frond, head bare, flute (control symbol) above, L PISO FRVGI over P (control letter) below; $125.00 (€106.25)
 




  



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REFERENCES

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Catalog current as of Tuesday, March 19, 2019.
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Roman Republic Coins of 99-50 B.C.