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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Late Empire ▸ ValensView Options:  |  |  | 

Valens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.

Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I, and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians. In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens was defeated by the Goths at the catastrophic battle of Hadrianople, where he lost his life and two-thirds of the Roman army was killed.


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Valens was the younger brother of Valentinian I, and he was declared Augustus in 364 A.D. He was given command of the Eastern provinces, where he spent much of his time campaigning against the Goths and Persians. In 376 A.D., Valens allowed Gothic tribes, who were being driven forward by the Huns to settle in the Danube provinces. The Goths were so badly treated by the Romans that they rebelled. Valens was defeated by the Goths at the catastrophic battle of Hadrianople, where he lost his life and two-thirds of the Roman army was killed.
RS84407. Silver siliqua, RIC IX Trier 27(e)1, RSC V 109a, Hunter V 7, SRCV V 19675, VF, well centered, toned, flan cracks, bumps and marks, light corrosion, weight 1.963 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 28 Mar 364 - 24 Aug 367 A.D.; obverse D N VALEN-S P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on throne, Victory on globe in Roma's right hand, scepter or spear without point vertical in her left hand, Victory extends wreath in right hand and holds palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, TRPS in exergue; scarce; $160.00 (136.00)


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In England, where many siliquae are found clipped, silver Roman coins apparently continued to circulate long after the Empire abandoned the island. Clipping may not have been primarily intended to deviously obtain a little silver. Clipping may have actually been performed primarily to make the weight and value equivalent to contemporary coins in the medieval period.
RS84417. Silver siliqua, SRCV V 19675, cf. RIC IX Trier 27b, 27e, and 45a-b, RSC V 109a-c, Hunter V 7, VF, toned, scratches, clipped, weight 1.251 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, die axis 180o, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 368 - 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on throne, Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left, TRPS[?] in exergue; scarce; $80.00 (68.00)


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On 21 July 365, an earthquake and tsunami devastated Crete and Alexandria and affected Italy, Greece, and Palestine.

RIC Alexandria 3(b) and 5(b) are identical except for time period, which is impossible to distinguish.
RL67623. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Alexandria 3(b) or 5(b), LRBC II 2861 or 28163, SRCV V 19856, Cohen VIII 47, VF, nice green patina, weight 2.635 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 135o, 3rd officina, Alexandria mint, 28 Mar 364 - 17 Nov 375; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, ALEΓ in exergue; $32.00 (27.20)


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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RL77790. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Rome 24(b), LRBC II 725, SRCV V 19829, Cohen VIII 47, VF, well centered and struck on a tight flan, nice green patina, traces of flan casting sprues, weight 2.749 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, SM leaf RB in exergue; $32.00 (27.20)


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They look similar, but there is a significant physical difference between angels and Victory. Angels are all male. Victory (Nike) is female. On Byzantine coinage, the male angel replaced the female Victory after the reunion with Rome was concluded on 28 March 519 A.D.
RL77791. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Siscia 14(b)xvi, LRBC II 1330, SRCV V 19835, Cohen VIII 47, VF, well centered, green patina, bumps and marks, edge split, weight 2.895 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 24 Aug 367 - 17 Nov 375 A.D.; obverse D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from the front; reverse SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (security of the Republic), Victory walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, * / F left, M right, ASISC in exergue; $25.00 (21.25)







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OBVERSE LEGENDS

DNVALENSPERAVG
DNVALENSPERFAVG
DNVALENSPFAVG
IMPCEVALENSPFAVG
VALENSAVGVS


REFERENCES

Carson, R., P. Hill & J. Kent. Late Roman Bronze Coinage. (London, 1960).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 8: Nepotian to Romulus Augustus, plus tesserae & cotorniates. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Constantin II Zenon (337-491). Moneta 5. (Wetteren, 1996).
Hahn, Wolfgang. Moneta Imperii Romani-Byzantinii. (Vienna, 1989).
King, C.E. & D.R. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Pearce, J.W.E. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Volume IX, Valentinian I - Theodosius I. (London 1933).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. V: The Christian Empire...Constantine II to Zeno, AD 337 - 491. (London, 2014).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, November 21, 2017.
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Roman Coins of Valens