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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Themes & Provenance ▸ Collections ▸ Maxwell Hunt CollectionView Options:  |  |  |   

The Maxwell Hunt Collection

Maxwell Edward Hunt of Loudon, Tennessee, passed away 27 Aug 2008, at the age of 85. Max was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran of WW II and active in the Covenant Baptist Church. A former resident of Detroit, Michigan, he retired from RCA Service Company in 1984 and moved to Tennessee in 1988. Max was an avid genealogist and a member of the Society of Mayflower Descendants, a sponsor of the Plimoth Plantation and a member of the Clan MacRae Society of North America. Reflecting his faith, the Maxwell Hunt Collection includes many Biblical related coins.


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 454 - 404 B.C., Old Style Tetradrachm

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The old-style tetradrachm of Athens is famous for its almond shaped eye, archaic smile, and charming owl reverse. Around 480 B.C. a wreath of olive leaves and a decorative scroll were added to Athena's helmet. On the reverse, a crescent moon was added.

During the period 449 - 413 B.C. huge quantities of tetradrachms were minted to finance grandiose building projects such as the Parthenon and to cover the costs of the Peloponnesian War.
GS91495. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Cop 31, SNG Mnchen 49, Kroll 8, Dewing 1611, Gulbenkian 519, HGC 4 1597, SGCV I 2526, EF, beautiful old collection toning, well centered on a tight flan, edge test cut, weight 17.032 g, maximum diameter 24.9 mm, die axis 270o, Athens mint, c. 454 - 404 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right, almond shaped eye, crested helmet with olive leaves and floral scroll, wire necklace, round earring, hair in parallel curves; reverse owl standing right, head facing, erect in posture, olive sprig and crescent left, AΘE downward on right, all within incuse square; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $700.00 (616.00)


Agrippina Senior, b. 14 B.C., d. 33 A.D., Wife of Germanicus, Mother of Caligula and Agrippa Jr.

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The carpentum was a type of state carriage, with two wheels, and commonly drawn by a pair of mules. The privilege of riding in a carpentum in public festivals was sometimes granted to females of the imperial family. Agrippina's, carriage on the reverse of this coin, was very richly adorned with painting or carving on the panels, and the cover was supported by caryatides on the corners. When Caligula instituted games and other solemnities in honor of his deceased mother Agrippina, her carpentum went in the procession (Suet. Calig. 13).
RB91444. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I Gaius 55, BMCRE I Caligula 81, Cohen I 1, BnF II Caligula 128, Hunter I Gaius 36, SRCV I 1827, F, well centered, some obv. legend unstruck, rough, weight 24.658 g, maximum diameter 34.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 37 - 41 A.D.; obverse AGRIPPINA M F MAT C CAESARIS AVGVSTI, draped bust right, her hair tied in queue in back and one lock falling down side of neck; reverse S P Q R / MEMORIAE / AGRIPPINAE, carpentum drawn by two mules left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; $500.00 (440.00)


Roman Republic, A. Plautius, c. 55 B.C.

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In 67 B.C., Aristobulus II rebelled against his older brother Hyrcanus II, the king of Judaea. Both brothers appealed to Pompey's deputy Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, who, bribed by a gift of 400 talents, decided in favor of Aristobulus. When Pompey arrived in Syria in 63 B.C., both brothers sent delegates to Damascus, but Pompey did not make an immediate decision. Aristobulus' followers refused to open the gates of Jerusalem and Romans forces besieged and captured the city. Pompey deemed Hyrcanus II, the elder, weaker brother a more reliable ally. Hyrcanus was restored as high priest, but not as king. Aristobulus was taken to Rome as a prisoner. In 57 B.C. Aristobulus escaped to Judaea and instigated another rebellion. A young cavalry commander, Marc Antony, led several men to scale Aristobulus' fortifications leading to his recapture. At the time this coin was struck in 55 B.C., Aristobulus was a prisoner in Rome. Julius Caesar released him in 49 B.C., hoping to turn Judaea against Pompey, but on his was to Judaea he was poisoned by a Pompey supporter. With help from the Parthians, Aristobulus' son Antigonus rebelled against Rome and became king in 40 B.C. He was defeated by Rome and killed in 37 B.C.

This special issue was struck by an Aedile Curule. Aediles supervised public works and staged games. Since this issue bears turreted Cybele, we may speculate it was to finance a building project.
RR91410. Silver denarius, RSC I Plautia 13, Sydenham 932, Crawford 431/1, BMCRR Rome 3916, Russo RBW 1540, SRCV I 395, VF, old collection toning, reverse a little off center, weight 3.803 g, maximum diameter 17.3 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse AED CVR S C downwards on left, A PLAVTIVS downwards on right, turreted head of Cybele right, wearing cruciform earring, hair rolled and in knot at the back, locks falling down neck; reverse Bacchius Judaeus (Aristobulus II High Priest and King of Judaea) kneeling right, with left hand holding reins of camel standing right on his far side, raising olive branch in right hand, IVDAEVS upward on right, BACCHIVS in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $250.00 (220.00)


Antonia, Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula

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Antonia was daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, wife of Nero Claudius Drusus, sister-in-law of Tiberius, mother of Claudius, and grandmother of Caligula. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia spent her long life revered by the Roman people and enjoyed many honors conferred upon her by her relatives. All her coinage was issued early in the reign of Claudius. She died around 37 A.D., possibly as a result of forced suicide ordered by Caligula.
RP91440. Orichalcum dupondius, RIC I Claudius 92, BMCRE I Claudius 166, Cohen I 6, BnF II Claudius 143, SRCV I 1902, aVF, green patina, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, weight 14.008 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 41 - 50 A.D.; obverse ANTONIA AVGVSTA, bare-headed bust right, hair in long plait; reverse TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius standing left, veiled and togate, simpulum in right, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $230.00 (202.40)


Miletos, Ionia, c. Late 6th Century B.C.

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One of the earliest coins struck in silver.
GA91393. Silver 1/12 stater, SNG Kayhan 462; SNG Cop 952; BMC Ionia p. 186, 34; SGCV II 3533, aEF, toned, well centered on a tight flan, weight 0.577 g, maximum diameter 9.9 mm, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. late 6th century B.C.; obverse forepart of lion left, head turned back right; reverse ornamental pattern in incuse square; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $200.00 (176.00)


Pergamon, Mysia, c. 85 - 76 B.C.

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The cista mystica was a basket used for housing sacred snakes in connection with the initiation ceremony into the cult of Bacchus (Dionysus). In the Dionysian mysteries a snake, representing the god and possibly symbolic of his phallus, was carried in a cista mystica on a bed of vine leaves. The cista in the mysteries of Isis may also have held a serpent, perhaps associated with the missing phallus of Osiris.

The thyrsus is the staff carried by Bacchus and his associates; topped by a pine cone or a bunch of ivy leaves and wreathed with tendrils of vine or ivy.
GS91390. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Kleiner Pergamum 32, Pinder 107, SNG BnF 1734, SNG Cop 430, VF, toned, a little flatly struck, some die wear, weight 12.287 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 30o, Pergamon (Bergama, Turkey) mint, c. 85 - 76 B.C.; obverse Cista mystica with half-open lid, from which a snake emerges, all within wreath of ivy with berries; reverse bow-case holding strung bow, ornamented with apluster, flanked on each side by snake with head erect, ∆I (control) over Prytaneis monogram between heads of snakes, case straps draped over snakes below, (Pergamon monogram) to left, snake entwined thyrsos to right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $160.00 (140.80)


Fulvia, Second Wife of Marc Antony, Autumn - December 43 B.C.

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In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. Cassius Dio wrote that she "..managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure." When Octavian returned in 41 BC, he accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. With Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions to fight against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Octavian's soldiers at Perusia used sling bullets inscribed with insults directed at Fulvia personally. Octavian besieged and starved Lucius into surrender in February 40 BC, after which Fulvia fled to Greece. Anthony reconciled with Octavian, blaming Fulvia for their quarrel. Fulvia, in exile at Sicyon, died soon after of an unknown illness. Anthony married Octavian's sister Octavia, and she reared all of Fulvia's children.
SH91438. Silver quinarius, Crawford 489/5, Sear CRI 122, Sydenham 1160, RSC I 4, RPC I 512, BMCRR Gaul 40, SRCV I 1518, aVF, old collection toning, struck with dirty dies, bumps and scratches, reverse off center, weight 1.476 g, maximum diameter 12.8 mm, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, autumn - Dec 43 B.C.; obverse winged bust of Victory right, with the likeness of Fulvia; reverse LVGV/DVNI (counterclockwise, in exergue and above), lion walking right, flanked by A - XL (year 40, Anthony's age); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Pegasi Coins; scarce; $160.00 (140.80)


Persian Empire, Lydia, Anatolia, Xerxes I - Darius II, c. 485 - 420 B.C.

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After the destruction of the Kingdom of Judah, the Jews were taken into the seventy-year Babylonian captivity. When ancient Persia took control of Babylon, Haman, the royal vizier, convinced King Ahasuerus to destroy all the Jews. Esther, Ahasuerus' queen and, unknown to him, a Jew, interceded on behalf of her people. By law the King could not rescind the order to slaughter the Jews, so he issued a second decree that permitted the Jews to defend themselves with armed force. The King replaced Haman with Mordecai, a palace official, cousin and foster parent of Esther. The Jews defeated Haman, killing his ten sons that were leading the attacks, and then hanged Haman. The day after the battle was designated as a day of feasting and rejoicing. Scholars identify King Ahasuerus as the historical king Xerxes I, 485 - 465 B.C. Xerxes is the Greek version of his name but the Babylonians knew him as Khshayarsha. The Hebrew name Ahasuerus, appears to be derived from Khshayarsha, with the letter A added at the beginning.
GA91493. Silver siglos, Carradice type IIIb (early), pl. XII, 16 ff.; Rosen 673; SGCV II 4682; Carradice NC 1998 pl. 7, 155 ff.; Carradice Price p. 67 and pl. 17, 1 ff., VF, no banker's marks, old collection toning, light earthen deposits in punch, weight 5.343 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 485 - 420 B.C.; obverse Kneeling-running figure of the Great King right, transverse spear downward in right hand, bow in extended left hand, bearded, crowned; reverse irregular oblong punch; $160.00 (140.80)


Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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Ptolemy Soter wanted to integrate the Hellenistic and Egyptian religions by finding a deity that could win the reverence of both groups. The Greeks would not accept an animal-headed figure, so a Greek-style anthromorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.
RX91486. Billon tetradrachm, Kampmann 14.84; Geissen 170; Dattari 253; Milne 226; BMC Alexandria p. 19, 157; RPC I 5281; Kampmann 14.84; Emmett 133 (R1), gVF, old collection toning, well centered, highest points flat, few spots of corrosion, weight 12.522 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 64 - 28 Aug 65 A.D.; obverse NEPΩ KΛAV KAIΣ ΣEB GEP, radiate head right; reverse AYTOKPA, draped bust of Serapis right, wearing polos, LIA (year 11) right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $150.00 (132.00)


Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.

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On 11 March 222, Elagabalus was assassinated, along with his mother, Julia Soaemias, by the Praetorian Guard. Their mutilated bodies were dragged through the streets of Rome before being thrown into the Tiber. Severus Alexander succeeded Elagabalus. He was only 13 years old, his mother, Julia Avita Mamaea, governed the Roman Empire with the help of Domitius Ulpianus and a council of 16 senators.
RS91439. Silver denarius, RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, Hunter III 1, SRCV II 8212, VF, well centered, nice portrait, light toning, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.527 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 A.D.; obverse IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right; reverse IVNO CONSERVATRIX (Juno the protectress), Juno standing half left, veiled, patera in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, peacock right at feet on left; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $144.00 (126.72)




  



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