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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Phokis||View Options:  |  |  |   

Phokis, Greece

Phocis was mainly pastoral. The coinage of Phocis began at a very early period. Like the archaic money of Arcadia it is distinctly federal in character. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodical synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The Phocians were unpopular with other Greeks. In 480 B.C., a Phokian force of 1,000 volunteer shepherd boys was assigned to the heights at Thermopylae. They took one look at the advancing Persians and fled leaving open the back trail, which allowed the Persians to destroy Leonidas and the Spartans. The following year the Phokians actually joined the Persian side, the losing side, in the Battle of Plataea.Central Greece


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, Magistrate Phayllos, 352 - 351 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
SH68678. Silver triobol, Williams Phokians 401 (O.266/R.233); SNG Cop 122 (same dies); BMC Central Greece 21, 78 ff.; BCD Phokis 311, VF, attractive style, toned, weight 2.614 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 0o, Phokis mint, struck under Phayllos, 352 - 351 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind, Φ − Ω below, all within a round convex field; SOLD


Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - Early 141, Wife of Antoninus Pius, Delphi, Phocis

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SH54320. Bronze AE 24, Svoronos Delphi 89 - 92, SNG Cop 160, RPC Online 4602, F, weight 7.811 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Phokis, Delphi mint, obverse ΘEA ΦAVCTEINA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and banded, drawn up at the back and piled in a round coil at top; reverse ΠYΘIA, agonistic table with laurel wreath, apples, vase, and crow, small items in lower railing; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 445 - 420 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. Delphi, with its oracle, sanctuary dedicated to Apollo, Pythian Games, and treasuries was the main urban center.

The Phocians were unpopular with other Greeks. In 480 B.C., a Phokian force of 1,000 volunteer shepherd boys was assigned to the heights at Thermopylae. They took one look at the advancing Persians and fled leaving open the back trail, which allowed the Persians to destroy Leonidas and the Spartans. The following year the Phokians actually joined the Persian side, the losing side, in the Battle of Plataea.
SH65226. Silver triobol, Williams Phokians 234 (O163/R135), BCD Lokris 249 (same dies), VF, toned, weight 2.558 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 90o, Phokikon mint, c. 445 - 420 B.C.; obverse bull head facing, hair in ringlets; reverse head of Artemis right within incuse square, Φ−O−K−I in the four corners of the square clockwise from the top left; ex Münzhandlung Ritter; scarce; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 457 - 446 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. This coin type likely commemorates the sacrifice of a bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
GS89078. Silver triobol, Williams Phokians 194 (O141/R115), BCD Lokris 253.1, SNG Cop 99, HGC 4 1039 (R2), VF, high relief, attractive style, tight flan, porous, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.974 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 90o, Delphi mint, c. 457 - 446 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse head of Artemis right, ΦOKI in the corners starting upper right, the K reversed, the I sideways, all within incuse square; ex CNG e-auction 232 (28 Apr 2010), lot 63; rare; ON LAYAWAY


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, Magistrate Philomelos, c. 357 - 354 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head is perhaps symbolic of a special sacrifice held on behalf of the whole people, when a prize bull may have may have been the victim.
SH52308. Silver triobol, BCD Lokris 280.3, SNG Cop 120, F, weight 2.406 g, maximum diameter 15.0 mm, die axis 0o, Phokis mint, c. 357 - 354 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse laureate head of Apollo right, branch behind, Φ − Ω below; nice style; scarce; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, Magistrate Philomelos, c. 357 - 354 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
SH68665. Silver triobol, BCD Lokris 280.3, SNG Cop 120, VF, fine classical style, toned, lightly etched surfaces, weight 2.632 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 135o, Phokis mint, c. 357 - 354 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse laureate head of Apollo right, branch behind, Φ − Ω below; scarce; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 440 - 420 B.C.

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Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
SH27165. Silver triobol, cf. BCD Locris 257 ff., SNG Cop 99 ff., HGC 4 1043 (R2), aVF, weight 3.032 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 270o, Phokis mint, obverse bull head facing; reverse ΦOKI, head of Artemis right, all within incuse square; scarce; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 478 - 460 B.C.

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The Phocians were unpopular with other Greeks. In 480 B.C., a Phokian force of 1,000 volunteer shepherd boys was assigned to the heights at Thermopylae. They took one look at the advancing Persians and fled leaving open the back trail, which allowed the Persians to destroy Leonidas and the Spartans. The following year the Phokians actually joined the Persian side, the losing side, in the Battle of Plataea.
GA68399. Silver obol, BCD Lokris 205 (same dies, dies not in Williams Phokians), gVF, toned, obverse off-center, weight 0.925 g, maximum diameter 10.8 mm, die axis 90o, Phokis mint, c. 478 - 460 B.C.; obverse Φ−O, facing bull head; reverse Φ−O, forepart of boar right, showing both legs, right foreleg bent; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 457 - 446 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
GS77475. Silver triobol, Williams Phokians 194 ff., BCD Lokris 235.1, SNG Cop 99 - 100, VF, obverse die crack, light marks, weight 2.890 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, die axis 90o, Delphi mint, c. 418 B.C.; obverse bull head facing; reverse head of Artemis right, ΦOKI in the corners starting upper right, the K reversed, the I sideways, all within incuse square; scarce; SOLD


Phokis, Greece, Federal Coinage, c. 449 - 447 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Phocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.
GA68398. Silver obol, cf. BCD Lokris 246, Williams Phokians 227, SNG Cop 104 ff., SNG Lockett 1713, VF, nice style, high relief bull head, weight 0.839 g, maximum diameter 9.4 mm, die axis 315mo, Phokikon mint, c. 449 - 447 B.C.; obverse Φ−O, facing bull head, parallel lines for hair; reverse forepart of boar right, stippled hide, both legs showing, right foreleg bent; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry, et al. Roman Provincial Coinage. (1992 - ).
Grose, S. W. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Vol. I - III. (Cambridge, 1923-29).
Head, B. A Catalog of the Greek Coins in the British Museum, Central Greece (Locris, Phocis, Boeotia, and Euboea). (London, 1884).
Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG. The BCD Collection, Lokris - Phokis. Auction 55. (8 October 2010). Zürich.
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Volume 1: Europe. (London, 1978).
Strauss, P. Collection Maurice Laffaille - monnaies grecques en bronze. (Bàle, 1990).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part 3: Akarnanien-Bithynien. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece 6, The Alpha Bank Numismatic Collection, From Thessaly to Euboea. (Athens, 2011).
Williams, R.T. Silver Coinage of the Phokians. (London, 1972).

Catalog current as of Saturday, September 21, 2019.
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Phokis